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Which clippings match 'University Of California' keyword pg.1 of 1
02 MARCH 2014

TED: simply toying with risk so as to re-affirm the comfortable?

"We hear that not only is change accelerating but that the pace of change is accelerating as well. While this is true of computational carrying–capacity at a planetary level, at the same time ––and in fact the two are connected–– we are also in a moment of cultural de–acceleration. We invest our energy in futuristic information technologies, including our cars, but drive them home to kitsch architecture copied from the 18th century. The future on offer is one in which everything changes, so long as everything stays the same. We'll have Google Glass, but still also business casual. This timidity is our path to the future? No, this is incredibly conservative, and there is no reason to think that more Gigaflops will inoculate us. Because, if a problem is in fact endemic to a system, then the exponential effects of Moore's Law also serve to amplify what's broken. It is more computation along the wrong curve, and I don't think this is necessarily a triumph of reason. Part of my work explores deep technocultural shifts, from post–humanism to the post–anthropocene, but TED's version has too much faith in technology, and not nearly enough commitment to technology. It is placebo technoradicalism, toying with risk so as to re–affirm the comfortable. So our machines get smarter and we get stupider. But it doesn't have to be like that. Both can be much more intelligent. Another futurism is possible."

(Benjamin Bratton, 20 December 2013)

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TAGS

2013 • American Idol (reality television) • astrophysics • Benjamin Bratton • bright futures • business casual • California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology • call to actioncommunicate to the massescomplex issuescomplexitycultural changecultural transformation • design and geopoltics • egalitarian utopia • epiphany • epiphimony • frightening problems • Google Glass • information technology • infotainment • insight and realisation • intellectual viability • kitsch architecture • Kony2012meaningful ideas • middlebrow megachurch infotainment • moment of wonder • oversimplificationpersonal journeypersonal revelationpersonal story • personal testimony • placebo innovation • placebo medicine • placebo politics • placebo science • placebo technoradicalism • popularisation • re-affirm the comfortable • reductionism • rhetorical device • San Diego • smart people • smart things • swallowed without chewing • technological determinismtechnology and culturetechnology innovationTED Talks • toying with risk • triumphs and tribulations • University of California • vicarious insight • world-changing ideas

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JANUARY 2013

Online Educational Delivery Models: A Descriptive View

"Although there has been a long history of distance education, the creation of online education occurred just over a decade and a half ago – a relatively short time in academic terms. Early course delivery via the web had started by 1994, soon followed by a more structured approach using the new category of course management systems.1 Since that time, online education has slowly but steadily grown in popularity, to the point that in the fall of 2010, almost one–third of U.S. postsecondary students were taking at least one course online. Fast forward to 2012: a new concept called Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) is generating widespread interest in higher education circles. Most significantly, it has opened up strategic discussions in higher education cabinets and boardrooms about online education. Stanford, MIT, Harvard, the University of California–Berkeley, and others have thrown their support – in terms of investment, resources, and presidential backing – behind the transformative power of MOOCs and online education. National media outlets such as the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, and The Atlantic are touting what David Brooks has called "the campus tsunami" of online education.

Unfortunately, a natural side effect of this new interest in education and educational technology is an increase in hype and in shallow descriptions of the potential for new educational models to replace the established system. All too often, the public discussion has become stuck in a false dichotomy of traditional vs. online – a dichotomy that treats all online models as similar and that ignores blended or hybrid approaches. This false dichotomy is even more evident now that discussions are spilling into national media forums. But in fact, as my colleague Molly Langstaff has described, educational technology is interacting with innovative educational courses and programs to create not only new language but also multiple models for delivering education."

(Phil Hill, 1 November 2012, Educause Quarterly)

TAGS

1994Berkeley (University of California)blended learning • course delivery via the web • course management systems • David Brooks • distance educationeducation deliveringeducational technologyEducause QuarterlyHarvard Universityhigher education • hybrid learning • innovative educational courses • MIT • Molly Langstaff • MOOCs • new educational models • online coursesonline delivery • online models • Phil Hill • post-secondaryStanford Universitystructured approach • the campus tsunami • transformative process • University of California

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 MAY 2010

Representational State Transfer (REST)

"The Representational State Transfer (REST) style is an abstraction of the architectural elements within a distributed hypermedia system. REST ignores the details of component implementation and protocol syntax in order to focus on the roles of components, the constraints upon their interaction with other components, and their interpretation of significant data elements. It encompasses the fundamental constraints upon components, connectors, and data that define the basis of the Web architecture, and thus the essence of its behavior as a network–based application."

(Roy Fielding, 2000)

[1] Cody Fauser, James MacAulay, Edward Ocampo–Gooding, and John Guenin 'High level overview of a RESTful Rails web service'.

[2] Fielding, Roy Thomas. Architectural Styles and the Design of Network–based Software Architectures. Doctoral dissertation, University of California, Irvine, 2000.

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TAGS

2000abstractionAPIcommon interfacedata • distributed hypermedia system • integratenetwork • network-based application • programming • Representational State Transfer • RESTREST APIRoy Fieldingsoftware architectureUniversity of Californiaweb architectureweb services

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 NOVEMBER 2008

Manuel Castells: Identity and Change in the Network Society

"On this edition of Conversations with History, UC Berkeley's Harry Kreisler welcomes social theorist Manuel Castells, Professor of Sociology and Professor of City and Regional Planning at UC Berkeley, to discuss identity and change in the network society. Series: "Conversations with History" [6/2003] [Humanities] [Show ID: 7234] "
(University of California Television)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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