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Which clippings match 'Newspaper Tycoon' keyword pg.1 of 1
13 JULY 2014

The Fountainhead: a testament to uncompromising individualism

"The work of Rand, most of it published between the 1940s and 1960s, was very popular in the United States and gained a large and still active following. Rand developed her own school of philosophy called Objectivism, that centers on the principle of selfishness. In her novels and philosophical works, Rand advocates a form of rational and ethical egoism, and a political order based on laissezfaire capitalism. Her two novels, Fountainhead (1943) and Atlas Shrugged (1957) are lengthy portrayals of strong individuals who heroically and steadfastly pursue their lives according to Rand's philosophical principles."

(P.W. Zuidhof, p.84, 2012)

Zuidhof, P. W. (2012). "Ayn Rand: Fountainhead of neoliberalism?" Krisis: Journal for contemporary philosophy(1).

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TAGS

19431949American dreamarchitect • artistic vision • Atlas ShruggedAyn Rand • battle of wills • challenging conventionscollectivismcompromiseconventionalitycreative geniusdesign commissioningdesign conventions • Edward Carrere • egoegoism • ethical egoism • fear of failure • form and function • form follows function • Frank Lloyd Wrightfree willfunctionalism • Gary Cooper • Howard Roark • human actionidealism • independent-mindedness • individualism • integrity • International Styleisolated sort of geniuslaissez faire capitalismLe CorbusierLudwig Mies van der Rohemelodramamodernist architecturemodernist idealsmoral purposeneoliberalismnewspaper tycoonnon-conformistobjectivismoptimistic idealPatricia Neal • personal integrity • personal visionpowerquestioning traditionsradical architecture • rational egoism • rational self-interest • rise to power • romantic notion of the artist • rousing speech • self-interestselfishnessskyscraper • smear campaign • struggle in obscurity • The Fountainhead • uncompromising integrity • uncompromising vision • weak-mindedness • William Kueh

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 JANUARY 2013

Citizen Kane: famous film transition from a photograph to real life

"Another transition takes us to the same three men, this time reflected in the window of the Chronicle, Kane's major rival (Circulation 495,000). 'I know you're tired, Gentlemen... Kane begins, suggesting the men have come straight from the offices of the Inquirer after spending all night getting the paper out. The scene not only illustrates Kane's tireless ambition, but provides a seamless transition from the humble beginnings of the Inquirer to the day, six years later, when Kane has managed to poach the entire reporting staff captured in a photograph prominently positioned in the window of the Chronicle on that first night. The camera slowly dollies in on the reporters as Bernstein tells Kane it took the Chronicle twenty years to gather such a highly respected staff. 'Twenty years?' says Kane, 'Wells' – and suddenly, as the sentence Kane speaks spans six years, the reporters are no longer still images in a photograph but moving, breathing people – 'six years ago I looked at a picture of the world's greatest newspapermen. I felt like a kid in front of a candy store.' Kane himself then enters from the left, looking prosperous and confident..."

(Movie Movie)

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TAGS

1941 • captured in a photograph • Charles Foster Kane • Citizen Kanecoming to life • Everett Sloane • film transition • group photograph • humble beginnings • Joseph Cotten • living photonewspaper • newspaper circulation • newspaper tycoon • newspapermen • Orson Wellesphotograph • poach • reflected in the window • reporters • reporting staff • respected staff • scene transition • screen-mediated virtual space • seamless transition • sequence transitionshop windowtableau • The Chronicle • The Inquirer • transition

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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