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Which clippings match 'Cross-disciplinary' keyword pg.1 of 4
18 JANUARY 2013

empyre: critical perspectives on contemporary cross-disciplinary issues, practices and events in networked media

"–empyre– facilitates critical perspectives on contemporary cross–disciplinary issues, practices and events in networked media by inviting guests –key new media artists, curators, theorists, producers and others to participate in thematic discussions.

–empyre– is an Australian based global community which preserves its autonomy as a non–hierarchical collaborative entity by engaging with new content on a monthly basis. The list was instigated by Melinda Rackham (AU) in 2002. The community grew exponentially and within the first year Adrian Miles (AU) and Rebecca Cannon (AU) joined briefly as facilitators. Long–term facilitators Christina McPhee (USA) and Michael Arnold Mages (USA) were invited to the –empyre– curatorium soon after, and during the next years they were joined by Jim Andrews (CA)and Felix Sattler (AU/GER). In 2005 Tracey Meziane (AU) and Marcus Bastos (BR) joined the team, and in 2006 and 2007 it was extended with Sérgio Basbaum (BR), Nicholas Ruiz III (USA), Renate Ferro (USA) and Tim Murray (USA). To find out more go to who is –empyre–"

(Melinda Rackham)

TAGS

2002 • Adrian Miles • Australian • Christina McPhee • contemporary practicescritical perspectivescross-disciplinary • cross-disciplinary issues • cross-disciplinary knowledge communitycross-disciplinary research • curatorium • dOCUMENTA (festival) • empyre • Felix Sattler • fibrecultureglobal community • Jim Andrews • Marcus Bastos • Melinda Rackham • Michael Arnold Mages • network society • networked media • new content • new media • new media artists • new media curators • new media producers • new media theorists • Nicholas Ruiz • non-hierarchical collaborative entity • Rebecca Cannon • Renate Ferro • Sergio Basbaum • thematic discussions • Tim Murray • Tracey Meziane

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JANUARY 2013

Eighth International Conference on the Arts in Society

Eighth International Conference on the Arts in Society, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary, 24–26 June 2013

"The purpose of the annual Arts Conference is to create an intellectual platform for the arts and arts practices, and to create an interdisciplinary conversation on the role of the arts in society. It is intended as a place for critical engagement, examination and experimentation of ideas that connect the arts to their contexts in the world–on stage, in studios and theaters, in classrooms, in museums and galleries, on the streets and in communities.

Its scope is deliberately broad and ambitious. Our times demand nothing less than cross–disciplinary and holistic approaches. The breadth of the Conference and its accompanying Journal, however, are without prejudice to finely grained discussion of the specific, the local and the grounded practices.

The Conference provides a venue and a framework for the arts and art practices that are situated within the context of international art expositions, festivals and biennials engaged with the international production of art and its global distribution networks. This Conference aims to discover what values, instincts and common ground may exist within the arts and their practices and sites of reception around the world. Your participation shapes the Conference itself.

We are inviting proposals for paper presentations, workshops/interactive sessions, posters/exhibits, or colloquia (See Proposal Types). Virtual participation is available for those who are unable to attend the conference in person. Proposal ideas that extend beyond these thematic areas will also be considered.For more information about the ideas and themes underlying this community, see Our Focus."

TAGS

2013art and design conferenceart and educationart educationart practicesarts • arts conference • arts education • arts history and theory • Arts in Society Conference • arts practices • Budapestcall for paperscolloquiaCommon Ground (publishing)conferencecreative artscritical engagementcross-disciplinary • Eotvos Lorand University • holistic approaches • Hungaryinterdisciplinaryinternational conferencenew media • paper presentations • political and community agendas in the arts • poster sessions • roundtable sessions • scholarly platform • technology and the arts • the arts • The Arts Knowledge Community • the role of the arts in society • theory and practicevisual arts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 NOVEMBER 2012

Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication: contextual studies, and enterprise and entrepreneurship

"The adaptability necessary to succeed as a design or media specialist comes not only from deep disciplinary knowledge. Graduates also need a breadth of knowledge and skills which some commentators have referred to as being 'T–Shaped'. These additional skills include the ability to work with and increasingly work across disciplines, entrepreneurial attitudes and a knowledge of the business contexts in which they will operate. All undergraduate Ravensbourne programmes incorporate curriculum and learning activities designed to develop these skills in our students. Cross–disciplinary collaborative projects offer students the opportunity to work in teams with other disciplines.

The course structure draws on the creative synergies and frictions of the different disciplines at Ravensbourne and provides physical and intellectual opportunities for students to meet, learn and work together with students from different disciplines."

(Ravensbourne, UK)

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TAGS

adaptability • breadth of knowledge • collaborative project • contextual studies • course designcourse finder • creative frictions • creative synergies • cross-disciplinarycurriculum designdesign graduatesdesign specialistdigital designdigital mediadisciplinary fieldsdisciplinary knowledge • enterprise and entrepreneurship • entrepreneurial attitudes • entrepreneurship • intellectual opportunities • knowledge of business contexts • learning activitieslearning experience • media specialists • Ravensbourne • Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication • sub-disciplinary fields • sub-disciplinesubject specialistsT-shaped skillsteam workUKundergraduate studentsworking across disciplines

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JUNE 2012

Managing interdisciplinarity: a discussion of the contextual review in design research

"Although the debate about disciplinary status has not interrupted the production of innovative design research, as a relatively recent member of academia's 'tribes and territories' (Becher 1989) design is still establishing its disciplinary characteristics as a general research field and a set of specialist sub–fields. There is, for instance, some debate about whether design scholarship should include creative practice and reflection (for a sample of contrasting positions see Bayazit 2004; Downton 2001; Durling 2002; Roth 1999). Since a majority of design issues originate in everyday life individual design research questions are unlikely to fit specific disciplinary boundaries, the idea that design research definitively engages with multiple fields and literatures being widely acknowledged (Poggenpohl et al 2004). These considerations have contributed to the debate as to whether design research should conform to established models from the sciences and humanities or develop its own integral approaches. We suggest, however, that a greater focus on design's applied nature and inherent interdisciplinarity could profitably overtake the quest for disciplinary clarity."

(Carolyn Barnes and Gavin Melles, 2007)

1). Proceedings of 'Emerging Trends in Design Research', the International Association of Societies of Design Research (IASDR) Conference, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, 12–15 November 2007

TAGS

academiaacademic disciplines • applied design research • applied nature of design • applied research • Barbel Tress • Carolyn Barnes • contextual frameworks • contextual review • contextualised application • creative practice and reflection • cross-disciplinary • David Durling • design issuesdesign research • design research questions • design scholarshipdisciplinary boundaries • disciplinary characteristics • disciplinary clarity • disciplinary status • Ernest Boyer • established models • everyday life • Gary Fry • Gavin Melles • general research field • Gunther Tress • higher education • Hilla Becher • IASDR • industry-oriented knowledge • innovative design research • intellectual challenge • interdisciplinarityinterdisciplinary knowledgeInternational Association of Societies of Design Researchknowledgeknowledge production • methods and principles • Mode 1Mode 2 • Mode 2 knowledge production • multifaceted social situations • multiple fields • multiple research fields • narrative case studies • Nigan Bayazit • non-disciplinary knowledge • orthodox disciplinary knowledge • Peter Downton • Praima Chayutsahakij • professional doctorate • reflexive knowledge • researchresearch students • research supervisors • review of literatureRichard Buchanansciences and humanities • set of specialist sub-fields • Sharon Poggenpohl • situated knowledge • sources of knowledge • Susan Roth • Swinburne University of Technology • tribes and territories • vocational foundations

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 APRIL 2012

Towards a Performative Aesthetics of Interactivity

"I identify a two–decade period – roughly speaking 1985–2005 – as the pioneering experimental period of (computer based) interactive art. Crucial to the understanding of work in this period is the blindingly rapid development of the technological context. At the beginning of the period the graphical user interface was a novelty, the internet barely existed, the web was a decade away, interactivity was an intriguing concept. The production of acceptably high resolution illusionistic digital pictures (still frames) was an active research area and a megabyte of RAM was something luxurious.

The period neatly brackets the emergence of most of the major technological milestones which now undergird digital culture and ubiquitous computing: WYSIWYG, digital multimedia, hypermedia, virtual reality, the internet, the world wide web, digital video, real–time graphics, digital 3D, mobile telephony, GPS, Bluetooth and other mobile and wireless communication systems. It was a period of rapid technological change, euphoria and hype."

(Simon Penny, 2011)

Simon Penny (2011). "Towards a Performative Aesthetics of Interactivity", Fibreculture Journal, issue 19 2011: Ubiquity.

Fig.1 Sniff and Performative Ecologies were included in Emergence, a show of Artificial Life Art curated by Simon Penny and David Familian at the Beall Center for Art and Technology, University of California Irvine, December 2009–April 2010. Regrettably Performative Ecologies did not function as designed during the exhibition.

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TAGS

19852005academic journal • artificial life art • bluetoothcomputer based interactive artconvergencecross-disciplinarydesign historydesign researcherdigital 3Ddigital culturedigital multimediadigital videofibrecultureFibreculture JournalGPSgraphical user interfacehistory • honeymoon period • hypermedia • illusionistic digital pictures • interactive artinteractivityInternetmedia art • megabyte • mobile and wireless communication systems • mobile telephony • multimedianew medianovelty • performative ecologies • pioneering experimental period • RAM • rapid development • rapid technological changereal-time graphics • Simon Penny • speculative designtechnological changetechnological context • technological milestones • timelineubiquitous computingverisimilitudevirtual realityvisualisationweb designworld wide webWYSIWYG

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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