Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Community Participatory Project' keyword pg.1 of 1
19 JANUARY 2016

Skins: Designing Games with First Nations Youth

"Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC), based out of Obx Labs at Concordia University in Montreal and directed by Lewis and Skawennati Fragnito, is a network of academics, artists, and technologists that encourages Indigenous participation in online culture and exploration of new media technology. The main objective of the AbTeC research network is to discover, define, and implement methods by which Indigenous people can use networked communication technology to strengthen our cultures. In an effort to overcome the economic, social, and cultural factors that influence the low rate of Indigenous participation in the making of new media and encourage Indigenous representation in digital games and virtual worlds specifically, AbTeC proposed to conduct Skins, a game/virtual world development workshop for Aboriginal youth that teaches them design programming, art, animation, and audio. ...

In conducting Skins, our goal is to encourage First Nations youth to be more than consumers of digital media; rather, we wish to show them how they themselves can be creators who can approach games with a critical perspective and from within their own cultural context. We are motivated by the possibilities of digital games and virtual environments for Indigenous peoples as well as correcting or adding to representations of Indigenous peoples in commercial games. Indigenous peoples' survival, recovery, development, and self-determination hinges on the preservation and revitalization of languages, social and spiritual practices, social relations, and arts [1]. Digital games and virtual environments, with their unique combination of story, design, code, architecture, art, animation, and sound [2], provide a rich medium though which to explore different strategies for pursuing such preservation and revitalization. For example, Thornton Media's RezWorld is a virtual environment for learning the Cherokee language. It has even been argued that the fluid, open, and networked characteristics of modern digital media make it particularly useful as a tool for Aboriginal storytelling, with Loretta Todd, Cree/Métis filmmaker and Director of the Aboriginal Media Arts Lab, suggesting 'the experience of cyberspace offers the reversal of narrative as derived from storytelling, a return to oral tradition' [3]. Furthermore, due to the radical decrease in the costs of the means of production and distribution, digital games and virtual worlds present Indigenous people with a powerful opportunity to widely (or narrowly) communicate stories in which we shape our own representation."

(Beth Aileen Lameman and Jason Edward Lewis, 2011)

1
2

TAGS

2011Aboriginal culture • Aboriginal Media Arts Lab • Aboriginal storytelling • Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC) • Aboriginal youth • Bart Simon • Beth Aileen Lameman • CanadaCelia Pearce • Cherokee language • Christian Beauclair • community participatory project • Concordia University • Cree • cultural representations • development workshop • digital games • digital media and learning • Dogrib • First NationsFirst Nations youth • Haudenosaunee • Indigenous cultural production • Indigenous participation • Indigenous peopleindigenous peoples • Indigenous representation in digital games • Indigenous representation in virtual worlds • Iroquois • Jason Edward Lewis • Journal of Game Design and Development Education • Katherine Isbister • Ken Finney • language preservation • Loretta Todd • Louise Profeit • making new media • Metis • Mohawk • Montreal • more than consumers • Myron Lameman • Nacho Nyak Dun • Nehiraw • new media artist • new media technologiesNorth American • Obx Labs at Concordia University • oral traditionresearch network • revitalisation of languages • RezWorld • Richard Van Camp • self-determination • Skawennati Fragnito • spiritual practices • Steve Loft • Steve Sanderson • Thornton Media • traditional culturevideo game designvideo games and Indigenous peoplevirtual environmentsvirtual worlds

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JANUARY 2016

Love Punks: online game created by Australian Indigenous kids

"The Love Punks online game was created by a gang of 9,10 and 11 year old Love Punks from Roebourne in WA. For the last 8 months the Love Punks have been sweating it out, in 40 degree heat, on computers creating stop motion animations of themselves and friends in photoshop and flash."

(26 April 2012)

1
2

TAGS

2012 • 9-11 year olds • Aboriginal Australian kids • Aboriginal culture • Aboriginal kids • Adobe Flash • bearded dragon • Big hART • Burrup Peninsula • childhood imagination • Chynna Campbell • comic bookcommunity participatory projectcreative participationdesert • designers of the future • disadvantaged communitiesDIY • Duncan Gates • First Nations youthfroggame designgreen screenhomemade gamesimagineeringIndigenous Australiansindigenous community • indigenous games and play • Indigenous people • Indigenous young people • interactive comic • kids • lizard • Lovepunks Game • mining • mud flats • Murujuga • NEOMAD • online game • outdoor game • peacockpersonal empowerment • Pilbara desert • pogona • remote communities • Roebourne • salt flats • Satellite Sisters • sea • social arts • stop motion animationstop-frame animation • Stu Campbell • Telen Rodwell • Trevor Jamieson • video gamevideo games and Indigenous peopleWestern Australia • Woodside (natural gas company) • Yijala Yala Project • young designersyoung peoplezombie

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JULY 2014

Hollow: An Interactive Documentary

"Hollow is a web–based documentary and participatory project that examines the future of rural America through the residents of West Virginia's McDowell County. ... the project is also primer for how to make the most of the college experience – Director Elaine McMillion leveraged resources at Emerson College, where she was earning an MFA, to produce Hollow."

(Shannon Carroll, 6 September 2013, PBS)

1
2

TAGS

2013American life • Appalachian • community participatory projectcommunity-generated content • decline • digital storiesdigital storytellingdocumentarydocumentary truth • Elaine McMillion • Emerson College • gradual decline • history • Hollow (2013) • hybrid experiencehypermediainteractive digital narrativesinteractive documentaryinteractive information visualisationinteractive multimediainteractive storytellinglayers of data • McDowell County • MFAOp-Docs • participatory project • personal significance • personal stories • rural America • rural lifescrolling experienceshort documentarysmall town Americasocial historytheir storiestimelinetruth and realityvideo portraitweb-based documentary

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MAY 2006

Face Your World: Neighbourhood Kids Photograph Their World

"[Face your World was] especially developed for kids from 6 to 12 years old, in 3 neighborhoods in Columbus, Ohio. It contains 4 different aspects: a multi user computer game with which the kids can recreate their own surroundings, a bus with 6 work spaces for the children, 3 bus stops on which the children's creations are exposed, and a web site showing the worlds and with more information on the project.

With digital photo cameras, the kids take pictures of their own neighborhoods. These photos are uploaded to the "face your world" system on the bus. After logging in, the kids can recreate their environment in a 3D space, using their own pictures as well as those that are already in the database.

The interactor consists of the 3D navigation mode and the 2D edit mode. In the navigation mode the user can place new objects in the 3D world by choosing a flat object or a box, and a texture from the database (a building or a car for example) to 'stick on' the object. The objects can be moved, rotated, lifted, scaled, deformed and deleted. It is also possible to modify an object in the 2D edit mode. On this 2D drawing board the kids can cut, draw, paint, type, mirror and erase.
While navigating and building their world, the children can take screen shots, which will be displayed on the bus stops and web site.

In the 3D world, the users are represented by avatars. This way, the kids can see each other navigate through the world. The world is one shared place in which every child also has its own exclusive area, where no one else is allowed to build, unless they ask for permission. The kids can then negotiate in a chat environment. This chat space can also be used to just send each other messages, making communication and cooperation a vital part of constructing a world."
(V2_Lab, 16.07.2002, center for art and media technology in Rotterdam)

1

TAGS

applied researchbus • center for art and media technology • childrencommunitycommunity participatory projectcommunity-generated contentdigital storiesexperimentation • Face your World • interdisciplinary • Jeanne van Heeswijk • kids • Marco Christis • neighbourhoodNetherlandsOhioparticipationphotograph • recreate • research centreresearch instituteRotterdamtheory buildingUSA
01 MARCH 2005

Answers to exploitation in photographs

"In 1973, while conducting a literacy project in a barrio of Lima, Peru, the noted Brazilian educator Paulo Freire (and his colleagues) asked people questions in Spanish, but requested the answers in photographs. When the question 'What is exploitation?' was asked, some people took photos of a landlord, grocer, or a policeman (Boal 1979, p.123). One child took a photo of a nail on a wall. It made no sense to adults, but other children were in strong agreement. The ensuing discussions showed that many young boys of that neighbourhood worked in the shoe–shine business. Their clients were mainly in the city, not in the barrio where they lived. As their shoe–shine boxes were too heavy for them to carry, these boys, rented a nail on a wall (usually in a shop), where they could hang their boxes for the night. To them, that nail on the wall represented 'exploitation. 'The 'nail on the wall' photograph spurred widespread discussions in the Peruvian barrio about other forms of institutionalized exploitation, including ways to overcome them."
(Singhal, A., M. J. Cody, et al. 2004)

Boal, Augusto. 1979 The theatre of the oppressed., New York, USA: Urizen Books.

Arvind Singhal, Michael J. Cody, et al. (2004). Entertainment–Education and Social Change: History, Research, and Practice, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

[An experiment in participatory research and research as social catalyst.]

1

TAGS

1973agencyAugusto Boalawareness raising • barrio • Brazilcommunity participatory projectexploitation • institutionalised exploitation • Limanail • nail on the wall • Paulo FreirePeruphotographphotographypoverty • shoe-shine boxes • shoe-shiner • slumSouth America
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.