Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Episodic Structure' keyword pg.1 of 1
05 DECEMBER 2015

Life Smartphone: a commentary on smartphone dependence

"Min Alxe, a student at the China Central Academy of Fine Arts, created 'Life Smartphone,' a darkly funny commentary on our culture's smartphone dependence. It shows different characters moving through the world and dying gruesome deaths while not paying attention to what's around them."

(Max Plenke, 08 May 2015)

1
2

TAGS

20152D animationaddiction • adverse health effects • animated short filmbehavioral addictionblack humour • China Central Academy of Fine Arts • compulsive behaviourcultural commentarydystopian futureengrossing activityepisodic structure • extended phone use • Life Smartphone (2015) • Min Alxe • morbidnasty mishapsour relationship with technologyout of controlparody • poor posture • prolonged phone use • selfiesmartphone dependencespectacular society • text neck • textingtxtingunhealthy behaviourvignette

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 SEPTEMBER 2015

Life Is Strange: episodic video games prove as addictive as episodic television

"In another important respect, however, Life Is Strange is quite on-trend: it's being released episodically, every six weeks, in two- to three-hour instalments. The premiere episode arrived on 30 January; episode two followed at the end of March, and the next is set for May.

Dividing a title into chapters and publishing them in succession has become something of a phenomenon in the gaming industry in recent years. It started as a low-risk alternative to the usual blockbuster release strategy – and of late has begun to yield many games that, like Life Is Strange, might never have been green-lit under the traditional system.

Simon Parkin, a freelance writer on games for the New Yorker magazine, believes the popularity of the episodic approach has been 'facilitated by the rise of digital distribution methods', which have made it 'much easier and cheaper to release any number of titles'. Instead of pressing and shipping costly discs to brick-and-mortar stores, publishers can now upload a title to online marketplaces like Steam and Sony's Playstation Store, where players can download them instantly.

That ease of digital access has all but revolutionized the dissemination of games."

(Calum Marsh, 26 April 2015)

1
2

TAGS

2015 • adolescent female • awkward adolescence • branching options • butterfly effect • choices • digital distributiondistribution models • Dontnod Entertainment • episodic format • episodic interactive drama • episodic structurefemale protagonistgirl • graphic adventure • illustrative style • inner struggle • interactive narrative • Life Is Strange (2015) • Maxine Caulfield • media distribution • memory and identity • memory and nostalgia • Michel Koch • nostalgia • photography student • PolaroidPolaroid camera • Raoul Barbet • reverse timerewind time • Square Enix • third-persontime manipulationtime rewindtime-based game mechanic • travel back in time • video game

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JULY 2014

The Phantom of Liberty: humorous critique of bourgeois conventions

"Luis Buñuel's The Phantom of Liberty was quickly dismissed upon its release in 1974. Not only did it have to contend with the lingering success of 1972's similarly themed but significantly less abstract The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, but it was quickly followed by the dreamlike, bi–polar romantic entanglement of the director's last film, That Obscure Object of Desire. Like Discreet Charm, the plot–free Phantom of Liberty is a patchwork of comedic sketches and sight gags through which Buñuel ravages a complacent European culture and the various sexual hang–ups and historical and cultural disconnects of its inhabitants. This heady, almost off–putting masterwork isn't particularly easy to decipher (maybe we aren't meant to), which is why it's best to approach it as a literal comedy of manners.

Films structured around daisy chains of dysfunction are a dime a dozen; most, though, are as tiresomely long–winded as they are content with their own strained circularity. This isn't the case with Phantom of Liberty, which begins with a shot of Goya's 1808 masterpiece 'The Third of May.' The painting depicts Napoleon's army executing a group of faceless Spaniards, and via a reenactment of this struggle, Buñuel depicts how one of Napoleon's captains tries to defile the monument of Doña Elvira only to be smacked on the head by the moving arm of the statue of the woman's husband. (He later intends to sleep with the woman's corpse, and when he opens her coffin, he's amazed by how her beauty has been preserved.) It's the first of many sight gags in the film, each and every one as startling as they are perversely funny. All these moments are possessed by a sense of shocked wonderment and discovery, and they all more or less evoke fragile pasts and characters trying to reconcile their historical detachments."

(Ed Gonzalez, 13 September 2003, Slant Magazine)

1

2

3

4

TAGS

1974absurd situationsabsurdist humourabsurdity • Adolfo Celi • Adriana Asti • Anne-Marie Deschott • apparition • Arch de Triomphe • archaic rules • Bernard Verley • black humour • bourgeois • bourgeoise societycancer • chance encounter • cigarettes • Claude Pieplu • coffin • comedic sketches • comedycomedy of mannerscorpsecritiquecultural conventionscultural pastdaughterdining practicesdinner tabledisappearancedoctor • Dona Elvira • eatingepisodic structureetiquetteEuropean cinema • European culture • faith • Francois Maistre • girl • Goya • Helene Perdriere • hotel • housemaid • humour • impulses • internal logic • intrusion • Jean Rochefort • Jean-Claude Brialy • Julien Bertheau • Le Fantome de la Liberte (1974) • Luis Bunuel • mailman • masterwork • Michael Lonsdale • Michel Piccoli • Milena Vukotic • Monica Vitti • Montparnasse • morality • nanny • narrative preconceptions • obscene • ostrich • parodypatchwork • Paul Frankeur • phallicphallic symbol • Philippe Brigaud • Pierre Maguelon • policepolite societypostcard • postman • psychoanalysisritual • rooster • rulesschool • schoolchildren • Serge Silberman • sexual hang-ups • sexual taboo • sight gag • sketch comedy • sniper • social behavioursocial conventionsSpanish filmsubconscioussurrealist cinemasurrealist filmmakertaboo • That Obscure Object of Desire (1977) • The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972) • The Phantom of Liberty (1974) • The Third of May (1808) • toilettriptych • vanished • visual gagzoo

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 JULY 2014

Once upon a time in a town called Merryville

"Once upon a time in a town called Merryville... comes the story of Grumpleton. This black comedy short in centred around the grumpiest man in the world, who just so happens to be living in the happiest place on Earth. It's fun, it's humorous, it's weird, and it looks amazing! It is Grumpleton."

1

TAGS

Andrew Dehnert • animated short filmAustralian short filmbathbathtubblack humour • Callan Woolcock • car exhaust • carbon monoxide • carbon monoxide poisoning • communications design agency • contemplating mortalityelectrocutionepisodic narrativeepisodic structurefantasy about deathfrustration • gas explosion • Grumpleton • grumpy • guillotine • hanging • jumping off a bridge • Kane Rowlingson • lawnmower • lightning strike • Luke Saunders • Merryville • Mike Lomas • morbidold man • once upon a time • shark attack • Stephanie McLaren • Steve Bradshaw • suicide • suicide bridge

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 NOVEMBER 2012

Dumb Ways to Die ad becomes surprise hit

"'Set fire to your hair, poke a stick at a grizzly bear ... Dumb ways to die ... dumb ways to die–ie–ie.' If the chorus isn't stuck in your head, it will be soon. Melbourne Metro Trains' darkly cute – and irksomely catchy – new ad for transport safety has gone viral, notching up a whopping 4.2 million YouTube views in less than a week. And nobody is more stunned by its success than the man behind the music, Sydneysider Ollie McGill. The Cat Empire keyboards player was commissioned to write the score to accompany lyrics to the McCann Group's new ad and has watched Facebook likes, Twitter shares and YouTube hits skyrocket as word of the animated video has spread like wildfire. ... In the ad, cartoon characters meet their ends in a number of colourful, sardonic ways, including a couple of nasty mishaps on train tracks, while the sweet chorus, 'dumb ways to die ... ' is instant earworm material."

(Daisy Dumas, 19 November 2012, Fairfax New Zealand Ltd.)

1
2

TAGS

20122D animationadadvertisementanimated videoanimationAustraliabearblack humourcartooncartoon characters • catchy • character animationcomedydark comedy • darkly cute • deathdie • dumb • dumb ways to die • earworm • episodic structuregone viral • Horrible Histories • humouriTunesMcCann Groupmeet their endsMelbourne • Melbourne Metro Trains • mistakes to avoidmusic videonasty mishaps • Ollie McGill • parablepublic service announcementsafety • sardonic • songwriter • stupid deaths • The Cat Empire • traintrain station • train tracks • transport safety • Wahroonga

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.