Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Design Council (UK)' keyword pg.1 of 3
21 OCTOBER 2013

Design briefing for SMEs

"Design briefs are an essential part of the design process. In fact, they mark the beginning of the design process, helping designers understand the business problem they are required to solve and businesses clarify what they need from a design project."

1

TAGS

businessbusiness analystbusiness consultant • business focused briefs • business problem • clear project objectivesdesign brief • design briefing • Design Council (UK)design processdesign projectdesign teamdomain expertexplicit objectivesexplicitly definedlingoPeter Phillipsproblem-oriented thinkingproblem-solvingproject definitionproject designproject goalsproject objectivesrequirements gathering • small and medium enterprise • small and medium-sized business • small company • SMB • SMETLAwriting a design brief

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 NOVEMBER 2012

UK Reviewing the new Design & Technology Curriculum

Reviewing the new Design & Technology Curriculum
Westminster Education Forum National Curriculum Seminar Series 2013
Timing: Morning, Wednesday, 13th February 2013
Venue: Central London

"As the Government concludes its National Curriculum review, this timely seminar focuses on the content of the new curriculum for Design and Technology (D&T) for each Key Stage, due to be introduced into schools from September 2014 – as well as the implementation challenges for schools. It will bring together key policymakers with school and college leaders, teaching unions, universities, employers and other stakeholders.

Delegates will assess the opportunities and challenges presented by D&T's designation as a 'foundation' subject, with a much less prescriptive Programme of Study, as well as the level of teaching time required to deliver the new Programme and whether it meets the needs of employers, colleges and universities.

Sessions also focus on wider issues in D&T including the quality of facilities available in both primary and secondary schools in England, the profile and CPD opportunities for D&T teachers and the role that industry can play in the delivery of D&T in schools."

(Westminster Education Forum, UK)

Fig.1 Chicago Middle School students participate in an invention school workshop led by James Dyson as the James Dyson Foundation begins its mission to encourage more American students to become future engineers and inventors, at the Sir Miles Davis Academy in Chicago, May 5, 2011 [http://momandmore.com/2011/05/james–dyson–foundation–just–launched.html].

1

TAGS

20132014 • Academy of Culinary Arts • Bel Reed • Bill Nicholl • CPDcurriculumcurriculum delivery • David Anderson • Department for Education • design and construction • design and technologyDesign and Technology AssociationDesign Council (UK) • DT • EBacceducation policyengineering and designEnglandEnglish Baccalaureate • foundation subject • Gina White • Government • implementation challenges • innovation and creativity • Institution of Mechanical Engineers • Isobel Pollock • IT • key stage • lateral thinking • lobbying • national curriculum • National Curriculum Seminar Series • North Baddesley Junior School • Ofsted • policy makersprimary schoolproblem-solving • programme of study • public policy • purposeful activities • Queen Elizabeths Grammar School • Richard Green • Royal Academy of Engineering • Sara Jayne Stanes • school leaders • secondary school • Susan Smith • synthetic thinkingtechnology educationUKUK GovernmentuniversitiesUniversity of CambridgeUniversity of Leeds • WEET • WEETF • WeF • Westminster Education Forum • Westminster Forum Projects • WFNF • WFP • WHF • Whitehall • WLPF • WMF

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2012

Design Guides for Business: Writing a design brief

"A brief is basically a set of instructions that set out what you want your designers to do, along with the objectives and parameters of the design project.

It should make clear what falls within – and outside – the scope of the work. This will help everybody refer back to where they started and make sure that the design work is developing according to your objectives.

It will also help you determine how successful the project has been when you reach the end. ...

Unfortunately, all too often briefs are agreed verbally – but a well–considered brief can act as a general grounding document if the project appears to be heading in the wrong direction, so it's well worth putting something in writing.

And remember, the brief isn't carved in stone; it can be adapted as you go along, as long as it's done in collaboration with everyone involved and the new version is also written down."

(Design Council, UK)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 OCTOBER 2012

Legal issues: intellectual property rights for the design industry

"Intellectual property law is made up of many elements of legal protection and a business might be concerned with any number of them. In some cases, IP ownership and its associated protection is inherent in the creation of the work and does not necessarily require further registration. Copyright is one example, which typically applies to 'artistic' works, such as books, music, software code and graphics. In other types, such as patents, registration is required. The tricky aspect is that any given design may qualify for one or more of the different intellectual property rights. Graphic design for a book, for example, would qualify for copyright, whilst the graphic elements of product packaging–such as the colours, lines or contours – might qualify for a 'registered design right', which is a different thing. The main types of intellectual property rights are: patents, copyright, unregistered design right, registered design right, trademarks."

(Design Council, UK)

TAGS

Anti Copying in Design • artistic works • book designbooksbusinesscopyright • creation of the work • Design Council (UK)graphic design • graphic elements • graphicsguide • guides for designers • intellectual propertyintellectual property lawintellectual property rights • IP ownership • lawlegallegal issues • legal protection • musicownershippackaging designpatent registrationpatentsprotection • registered design right • software codetrademarktrademarksUK • unregistered design right

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JULY 2012

The history of the UK Design Council

"The Design Council started life in 1944 as the Council of Industrial Design. It was founded by Hugh Dalton, President of the Board of Trade in the wartime Government, and its objective was 'to promote by all practicable means the improvement of design in the products of British industry'. And that was to stay unaltered through half a century of social, technological and economic change."

(UK Design Council)

Fig.1 "1951 Festival of Britain", Graphic created by: Design Council/Council of Industrial Design | From University of Brighton Design Archives. [JRGS Alumni Society: http://www.mel–lambert.com/Ruskin/News/News_Archive/JRGS02A_News_Archive32.htm]

1

TAGS

1944 • Board of Trade (UK) • Britain Can Make It • British industry • Buy wisely in Britain • CABE • Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment • consumers • Council of Industrial Design (UK) • Creative Britain • creative economy • David Kester • Design Centre (UK) • Design Council (UK)design educationdesign fielddesign historydesign industrydesign practitioners • design reform • design work • Festival of Britain • good design • Hugh Dalton • industrial design • Ivor Owen • John Sorrell • Keith Grant • manufacturing • Millenium Products • post-warprofessional association for designrealisation rulesrecognition rulesretailers • S C Leslie • shared practices • Sir Gordon Russell • Sir Paul Reilly • technological changeUKwartime

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.