Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Digital Art Exhibition' keyword pg.1 of 2
12 SEPTEMBER 2014

Automatic Art: human and machine processes that make art

Exhibition: 3 July–10 September 2014, GV Art gallery, London, 49 Chiltern Street, Marylebone, London W1U 6LY.

"This exhibition presents 50 years of British art that is generated from strict procedures. The artists make their work by following rules or by writing computer programs. They range from system–based paintings and drawings to evolving computer generated images."

1
2

3

4

TAGS

2014algorithmic art • Anthony Hill • Automatic Art (exhibition) • boredomresearch • British artchance artcomputer artcomputer art practicecomputer generated artcomputerised artdesign formalismdigital art exhibitiondigital artworkdigital materialism • Dominic Boreham • Ernest Edmonds • exhibitiongenerative artgenerative designgouache • GV Art Gallery • Harold Cohen • Jeffrey Steele • John Carter • Julie Freeman • Kenneth Martin • latticemachine-made • Malcolm Hughes • Michael Kidner • Nathan Cohen • orderly patternsorganisational processPaul Brown • Paul Smith (boredomresearch) • Peter Lowe • procedural artprocess artrule-based work • Sean Clark • simple rulesStephen BellStephen Scrivener • Steve Sproates • Susan Tebby • system-based drawing • system-based painting • systems art • Terry Pope • Trevor Clarke • Vicky Isley (boredomresearch) • visual abstractionvisual art • William Latham

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JUNE 2014

How do we create things together in a shared environment?

"When critical thinking is at its strongest, it often comes from exactly the sort of fluidity of practice that does run through Digital Revolution. The London–based architect and artist Usman Haque has been creating innovative software products alongside interactive artworks for more than 15 years. In 2007, he founded Pachube, a global data–sharing network that anticipated by years the current buzz around big data and the internet of things. In 2011, Pachube enabled hundreds of Japanese civilians to quickly and easily share weather and radiation data in the aftermath of the Fukushima disaster, boosting monitoring and relief efforts. Haque's Umbrellium team has produced a new artwork for Digital Revolution, which takes up the entirety of The Pit, the Barbican's subterranean theatre space. Called Assemblance, the piece allows about 25 people at a time to physically shape beams of light with their hands, pushing and pulling them around the space–while also bumping into and potentially messing up the shapes created by other people.

Haque calls it 'a virtual reality', but not in the sense of a purely digital realm: 'It's there, it's responding to you, you can see it, but as you try and approach it you can't actually feel it. For me, the idea is to question this distinction between the physical and the virtual.' The process is akin to building a sandcastle on the beach, where you are building a structure that anyone else, or the elements, can destroy in a moment.

Assemblance attempts to answer the question: 'How do we create things together in a shared environment, where we can't always trust each other, but we need to act together regardless?' This, indeed, is the situation we find ourselves in now. In the modern digital world, the question of participation is crucial as our various networks–social, media, national–require us to constantly mediate between acting as individuals and acting as a group. For Haque, the digital has given us 'the capacity to have an effect on the other side of the world almost instantaneously', from news events and economic flows to disaster response and warfare. 'We can do things to other people in distant lands, and so the question of our responsibility, and our culpability, is thrown up in ways that it hasn't been before. On the other hand, we now have the capacity to connect with each other, and develop new ways to work together, rather than against each other.'

Assemblance asks the audience to see itself as part of a networked whole, where actions have consequences. It also points towards the fact that 'the digital' is not a medium, but a context, in which new social, political and artistic forms arise. After 50 years, at least, of digital practice, institutions are still trying to work out its relevance, and how to display and communicate it–a marker, perhaps, that it is indeed a form of art."

(James Bridle, 18 June 2014, The Guardian)

Fig.1 Assemblance, a 3D interactive light field by Usman Haque and Dot Samsen from Umbrellium. Photograph: Umbrellium.

1

TAGS

2014 • act together • acting as a group • actions have consequencesartwork • Assemblance (artwork) • Barbican Centre • beam of light • big data • capacity to connect • collaborative action • collective culpability • collective responsibility • creating things together • data sharing • data-sharing network • digital artdigital art exhibitiondigital art form • digital context • digital practicedigital revolutionDigital Revolution (2014) • Dot Samsen • economic flowsflowsFukushimaGoogle DevArtimmersive experienceimmersive worksindividual and collective activities • innovative software • interactive artworks • interactive light fieldinternet of thingslightlight artlight installationlight sculpturemediated interactionmediated reality • modern digital world • new ways of working together • Pachube • part of a networked whole • participationphysical and digital interactionPongresponsive light installation • sandcastle • shared environment • trustUmbrellium • Usman Haque

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MAY 2014

Digital Revolution: an immersive exhibition of art, design, film, music and videogames

Exhibition: Digital Revolution at The Barbican Centre, London from 3rd July – 14th September 2014.

"Digital Revolution is the most comprehensive presentation of digital creativity ever to be staged in the UK. This immersive and interactive exhibition brings together for the first time a range of artists, filmmakers, architects, designers, musicians and game developers, all pushing the boundaries of their fields using digital media. It also looks at the dynamic developments in the areas of creative coding and DIY culture and the exciting creative possibilities offered by augmented reality, artificial intelligence, wearable technologies and 3–D printing.

Contribute to new commissions including Google's DevArt, an installation by global music artist and entrepreneur will.i.am and artist Yuri Suzuki and works by artists Umbrellium, Universal Everything, Seeper and Susan Kare (Mac Paint designer). Experience Oscar–winning visual effects behind Christopher Nolan's Inception and Tim Webber's Gravity, or go back in time to play classic videogames like Pacman and Space Invaders."

Chris Milk The Treachery of Sanctuary, 2012 The Creators Project, a partnership with Intel and VICE photography by Bryan Derballa.

1
2

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 JANUARY 2011

Drawing with Code: Works from the Anne and Michael Spalter Collection

29 January to 24 April 2011, deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, Lincoln, Massachusetts, USA.

"Drawing with Code brings together a selection of computer–generated art by the form's earliest and most important practitioners from the 1950s to today. The Providence–based collection of Anne and Michael Spalter is one of the largest and most important of its kind in the U.S. and shines a new light onto a darkened corner of the art historical record.

In our current digital environment when just about everyone holds the processing power of a full computer in their pocket, it is difficult to remember a time when computer technology was not involved in every aspect of our lives. In the arts–visual, cinematic, musical, dance, and theater–the computer has become not only an accepted, but in many cases, an intrinsic tool for artistic expression. The artists featured in Drawing with Code emerged in the early computer–era when the technology was rudimentary by current standards and its capabilities rarely extended beyond the world of computation. Merging their interests in art and coding, these practitioners came to be known as 'Algorists,' artists who employed original algorithms to create images. In addition to works on paper, Drawing with Code presents the work of two filmmakers, Lillian Schwartz and Stan VanDerBeek, who were brought into Bell Labs Research by Kenneth Knowlton to make some of the first computer art animations. These six animations were collaborations using Knowlton's BEFLIX (Bell Flicks) programming language for bitmap computer–produced movies.

The artists in Drawing with Code represent some of the earliest innovations in computer–generated art from the U.S., Europe, and Asia, pioneering a new form of collaboration between technology and art that pushed the boundaries of both.

Featured artists: Yoshiyuki Abe, Manuel Barbadillo, Jean–Pierre Hébert, Desmond Paul Henry, Sven Höglund / Bror Wikstörm, Sture Johannessen, G. F. Kammerer–Luka / Jean–Baptist Kempf, Hiroshi Kawano, Kenneth Knowlton, Ben F. Laposky, Manfred Mohr, Vera Molnar, Frieder Nake, George Nees, Lillian F. Schwartz, Stan VanDerBeek, Roman Verotsko, Mark Wilson, and Edward Zajac.

This exhibition is organized by guest curator George Fifield, Director, Boston Cyberarts Inc. and is part of the 2011 Boston Cyberarts Festival."

(deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, 2011)

Fig.1 Ben Laposky (1954–1956). 'Electronic Abstraction 4', oscilliscope, high speed film, photo paper, 16 1/2 inches x 13 inches, Collection of Anne and Michael Spalter.

1

TAGS

1950s2011 • Algorists • algorithm • Anne and Michael Spalter Collection • Anne Spalterartart and coding • BEFLIX • Bell Flicks • Bell Labs • Bell Labs Research • Ben Laposky • bitmap • Boston Cyberarts Festival • Bror Wikstorm • codecomputationcomputer artcomputer-generatedcreative practice • Desmond Paul Henry • digital art exhibitiondigital environmentdigital pioneersdrawing with codeearly computer-era • Edward Zajac • exhibitionfilmmakerFrieder Nake • G. F. Kammerer-Luka • generativeGeorg Nees • Hiroshi Kawano • influential worksinnovation • Jean-Baptist Kempf • Kenneth KnowltonLillian SchwartzManfred Mohr • Manuel Barbadillo • Mark Wilson • Michael Spalter • musicPierre Hebertpractitionerprogramming languageRoman Verostko • Stan VanDerBeek • Sture Johannessen • Sven Hoglund • technologytheatreVera Molnarvisual arts • works on paper • Yoshiyuki Abe

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 FEBRUARY 2010

Decode: Digital Design Sensations

"Decode: Digital Design Sensations showcases the latest developments in digital and interactive design, from small, screen–based, graphics to large–scale interactive installations. The exhibition includes works by established international artists and designers such as Daniel Brown, Golan Levin, Daniel Rozin, Troika and Karsten Schmidt. The exhibition features both existing works and new commissions created especially for the exhibition.

Decode is a collaboration between the V&A and onedotzero, a contemporary arts organisation operating internationally with a remit to promote innovation across all forms of moving image and interactive arts.

The exhibition explores three themes: Code presents pieces that use computer code to create new works and looks at how code can be programmed to create constantly fluid and ever–changing works. Interactivity looks at works that are directly influenced by the viewer. Visitors will be invited to interact with and contribute to the development of the exhibits. Network focuses on works that comment on and utilise the digital traces left behind by everyday communications and looks at how advanced technologies and the internet have enabled new types of social interaction and mediums of self–expression."

(The Victoria and Albert Museum, UK)

Video capture from Recode by Karsten Schmidt for the Decode website, 2009.

1

TAGS

2010abstractioncode • computer code • creative practiceDaniel BrownDaniel Rozindata • Decode • Decode: Digital Design Sensationsdesigndesign formalismdevicediagramdigital art exhibitiondigital culturedigital design • digital traces • exhibitionfluidgenerativeGolan Levininformation aestheticsinstallationinteractioninteractive artsinteractive designinteractivityInternet • Karsten Schmidt • ludicmedia artnetworknew medianotation • onedotzero • pattern • Recode (exhibition) • self-expressionsocial interactionspectacletechnology • The Porter Gallery • Troika • UKVictoria and Albert Museumvisual communicationvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.