Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Prefabrication' keyword pg.1 of 1
12 OCTOBER 2014

The Ulm School: designing the system rather than the object

"The Ulm School of Design was founded in 1953 by Inge Aicher–Scholl, Otl Aicher and Max Bill, with the main task of incorporate design into industry and to shape our material culture. In the post–war years, the process was marked by a crisis of values and resources, and this fact drove the Ulm School to re–think the meaning of creating forms in the contemporary world and to democratize the access to design. The exhibition explores the concept of 'system', related with a set of rationally components capable of generating an object, and also the systematic approach of the school, which included for the first time, the integration of science and art.

The importance of the Ulm School in the history of design comes from the strict methodology they imposed on project development. Focusing on an inter–disciplinary work and objective design analysis, it rejected design as an artistic activity and spread through industry to all walks of life. The school was recognized worldwide for its approach of focusing on the design of the system rather than the object."

(Ethel Baraona Pohl, 13 February 2012, Domus Magazine)

1

2

3

4

TAGS

1953 • 1972 Munich Olympics • access to design • Bilbao metro • Braun KM2 Multiwerk • communication analysis • communication problems • communication systems • construction systems • contemporary world • Design Hub Barcelona • design methodologydesign of the system rather than the objectDieter Rams • domestic products • Domus (magazine) • elementary objects • flexible products • furniture systems • Hans Gugelot • Hans Roericht • Herbert Lindinger • Inge Aicher-Scholl • integration of science and art • interchangeable elements • interdisciplinary working • Konrad Wachsmann • Lufthansa • material cultureMax Billmechanisation • methodological analysis • new approach • Nick Roericht • Norman Foster • objective design analysis • Otl Aicherpost-war eraprefabricationproject developmentsemiotics • simple systems • systematic approach • systems in electronics • tablewareUlm School of DesignWilhelm Wagenfeld

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 OCTOBER 2008

Nakagin Capsule Tower

"Kisho Kurokawa can't seem to catch a break these days. Just days after the Japanese architect lost his bid for the governorship of Tokyo, the Nakagin Capsule Tower, his best known building and one of the few built examples of the Metabolist movement, was given a date with the wrecking ball.

The Capsule Tower, completed in 1972, stands in the centre of Tokyo's affluent Ginza neighbourhood. The building is actually composed of two concrete towers, respectively 11 and 13 stories, each encrusted with an outer layer of prefabricated living units. It has long been appreciated by architects as a pure expression of the Metabolist movement, popular in the 1960s and 1970s, which envisioned cities formed of modular components. But in recent years residents expressed growing concern over the presence of asbestos. On April 15, the building's management association approved plans calling for the architectural icon to be razed and replaced with a new 14–story tower. A demolition is yet to be determined.

For his part, Kurokawa has pleaded to let the Capsule Tower express one of its original design qualities: flexibility. He suggested 'unplugging' each box and replacing it with an updated unit, letting the base towers –which he calls 'timeless'–remain untouched. Japan's four major architectural organisations, including the Japan Institute of Architects, support this scheme. But the building's management remained unconvinced and raised concerns regarding the towers' ability to withstand earthquakes, as well as its inefficient use of valuable land. The new building will increase floor area by 60 percent.

Following the board's decision, only Kurokawa continues to raise protest. If the Capsule Tower is destroyed as planned, it will join a growing list of losses. His Sony Tower in Osaka, completed in 1976, came down last year; Plantec Architects designed a glass–walled commercial building that will replace it."
(Yuki Solomon, Architectural Record)

1

2

3

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 OCTOBER 2008

Habitat 67

"Habitat 67 is an apartment complex built as part of the housing theme of Montreal’s Expo 67. A design based on the architect’s master’s thesis at McGill University, Moshe Safdie aimed to demonstrate the amalgamation of diversity and variation in residential living, whilst in exploration of built concrete in space. An affordable economic solution to housing with the necessary provisions plus garden, it was expected to set the trend for the modern urban landscape in which an increasing population would call for more architectural creativity. In all irony, however, units in Habitat 67 today are expensive as a result of the very design that pioneered them (owned by tenants in limited partnership, purchasing the development from the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation in 1985)."

(Complexe de la cité du havre)

1

2

3

TAGS

1967affordableaffordable housing • apartment complex • architecturebuilt environmentCanadaconcretecontainer urbanism • Habitat 67 • home ownerhousinglandmarks • man and his world • modularmodular designmodularity in designMontreal • Moshe Safdie • prefabricationresidential livingsimple house

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.