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Which clippings match 'Gamification' keyword pg.1 of 1
07 DECEMBER 2014

ActiWait: gamifying a pedestrian crossing with interactive pong game

ActiWait "makes waiting at the crosswalk for the signal to change more fun. The game is played while the light is red for the waiting pedestrians: a touch screen is mounted on two signal posts opposite one another. It is operated with your finger. Modeled after 'Pong', the computer game that has long since become a classic, there are two bars on the display, with which–moved with your finger –a ball can be batted back and forth. You get a point for every time your opponent misses the ball. In other words, this is a classic game with a new look and, perhaps most surprising, in a very different environment. Another charming part of the game: the opponents meet completely spontaneously and randomly, without knowing each other.

The idea for the project was first visualized in 2012 in a short video clip, in which the situation was simulated to look very life–like. In actual fact, the video presentation was a perfectly crafted synthesis of animation and real images. The simulation was developed on the computer and projected onto the traffic–signal buttons filmed with a green screen."

(HAWK Press Office)

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2012 • ActiWait • Christiane Dienel • computer gamecrosswalkdesign prototypedesign student projectdesigning experiencesgamificationGermany • HAWK Hildesheim • HAWK Hochschule fur angewandte Wissenschaft und Kunst • Hildesheim • Holger Michel • Ingo Meyer • interaction designMasters studentspedestrian crossingplayPongproduct designpublic spacepublic space use • Stefan Woelwer • StreetPong (prototype) • traffic intersectiontraffic light • traffic light button • traffic signal • University of Applied Sciences and Arts • urban infrastructure • urban interaction • user interactions • wireless connection

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 SEPTEMBER 2014

Engaging learners through uncertain rewards

"Uncertainty may be an important component of the motivation provided by learning games, especially when associated with gaming rather than learning. Three studies are reported that explore the influence of gaming uncertainty on engagement with computer– based learning games. In the first study, children (10–11 years) played a simple maths quiz. Participants chose their preferred reward for a correct answer prior to seeing each question. They could either receive a single point or toss an animated coin to receive 2 points for heads or none for tails. A preference for the uncertain option was revealed and this increased during the quiz. The second study explored the discourse around learning when pairs of participants (13–14 years) competed against the computer in a science quiz. Progress depended on the acquisition of facts but also on the outcomes of throwing dice. Discourse was characterised by a close intermingling of learning and gaming talk without salient problematic constructions regarding fairness when losing points due to gaming uncertainty. A final experiment explored whether, in this type of game, the uncertainty provided by the gaming component could influence players' affective response to the learning component. Electrodermal activity (EDA) of 16 adults was measured while they played the quiz with and without the element of chance provided by the dice. Results showed EDA when answering questions was increased by inclusion of gaming uncertainty. Findings are discussed in terms of the potential benefits of combining gaming uncertainty with learning and directions for further research in this area are outlined."

(Howard–Jones, P. A. and S. Demetriou, 2009)

1). Howard–Jones, P. A. and S. Demetriou (2009). "Uncertainty and Engagement with Learning Games." Instructional Science: An International Journal of the Learning Sciences 37(6): 519–536.

2). Paul Howard–Jones, 2014, radio programme, BBC Radio 4 – The Educators, episode 5 of 8, first broadcast: 10 September 2014.

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2009 • acquisition of facts • affective response • BBC Radio 4 • chance • chance outcome • coin toss • compelling engagement • competitioncomputer games • computer-based learning games • dopamine • educational neuroscience • educational psychologyeducational research • effective teaching • Electrodermal Activity (EDA) • fairnessgamblinggame-based learninggamificationgamifying learning and teaching • gaming uncertainty • learning and reward • learning and successlearning engagement • learning games • magnetic effect • memorymotivational needsneuroscience • neuroscience and education • our ability to learn • Paul Howard-Jones • prize • reward system • risk-taking • roulette wheel • running score • Skevi Demetriou • skill • sleep • The Educators (radio series) • throwing dice • transcranial electrical stimulation • uncertain options • uncertain rewards • uncertaintyvideo games

CONTRIBUTOR

Christa Van Raalte
16 MAY 2014

Digital Health: emerging healthcare practices through digital convergence

"Digital health is the convergence of the digital and genetics revolutions with health and healthcare. As we are seeing and experiencing, digital health is empowering us to better track, manage, and improve our own and our family's health. It's also helping to reduce inefficiencies in healthcare delivery, improve access, reduce costs, increase quality, and make medicine more personalized and precise. ...

The essential elements of the digital health revolution include wireless devices, hardware sensors and software sensing technologies, microprocessors and integrated circuits, the Internet, social networking, mobile and body area networks, health information technology, genomics, and personal genetic information.

The lexicon of Digital Health is extensive and includes all or elements of mHealth (aka Mobile Health), Wireless Health, Health 2.0, eHealth, Health IT, Big Data, Health Data, Cloud Computing, e–Patients, Quantified Self and Self–tracking, Wearable Computing, Gamification, Telehealth & Telemedicine, Precision and Personalized Medicine, plus Connected Health."

(Paul Sonnier, Story of Digital Health)

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big data • Body Area Network (BAN) • cloud computing • connected devices • connected health • digital convergence • digital genetics • digital healthdigital health solution • e-Patients • eHealth • emerging healthcare practices • emerging practices • ePatients • gamificationgamifyinggeneticsgenomics • hardware sensors • health 2.0 • health data • health IT • healthcare delivery • mHealthmobile health • nuviun • patient information • personal genetic information • Personal Health Information (PHI) • personalised healthcare • personalised medicine • precision medicine • quantified self • self-monitoring • self-tracking • social networking • software sensing technologies • superconvergence • technology convergence • telehealth • telemedicine • wearable computingwellbeing • wireless health

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 MAY 2011

Gamestorming: structured play for business innovation

"Games come naturally to human beings. Playing a game is a way of exploring the world, a form of structured play, a natural learning activity that's deeply tied to growth. Games can be fun and entertaining, but games can have practical benefits too.

This blog is about games designed to help you get more innovative, creative results in your work. We'll show you not only how to play them but how to design them so they fit your own specific work goals."

(Dave Gray, Sunni Brown and James Macanufo)

Dave Gray, Sunni Brown and James Macanufo (2010). 'Gamestorming: A Playbook for Innovators, Rulebreakers, and Changemakers', O'Reilly Media

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Amazon.comApplebest practicesbusiness innovationchange agentscollaboration • creative results • Dave Gray • design methodsdesign the futureeBayeconomic growthelevator pitchexploringgamegame mechanicgame playing • game principles • games • gamestorming • gamificationgamifyingGoogle IncHewlett-Packardinnovationinnovative companies • innovative people • James Macanufo • learning activity • MicrosoftNetflix • networked economy • Oracle Databasesoftware companies • structured play • Sunni Brown • teamwork • toolkit • tools and rules • visual thinking • work goals • Yahoo!

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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