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Which clippings match 'Mask' keyword pg.1 of 2
28 DECEMBER 2014

The beautiful decorative patterns of faux tribal masks

"The young Dutch designer starts each of his creations on the basis of a material experiment. This enables him to discover production techniques and aesthetic developments. The result lies within unusual and attractive patterns, colours and structures. ... His love for materials has given birth to a passion for textiles that have a strong impact on his creations and pushed him to imagine a series of bizarre masks, in 2010; masks that are to Matisse, 'a characteristic sign of our essence'."

(The Red List)

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2010abstract forms • aesthetic developments • aesthetic objectsanimal resemblances • animal-mask • Bertjan Pot • carpetcolour • colour combinations • colourful designs • costume designcraft and materialscraftingdecorative artsdecorative sewingdesign craftDutch designfabric • faux tribal art • geometric designs • geometric patterns • handicraft • human face • maskmask-making • material experiment • material practicesmaterials investigationnaive stylepastiche • production technique • rope • rope masks • sewing and craft • sewn together • stylised formstextile artstextile design • The Red List • vibrant colourvisual patternzoomorphism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 JUNE 2013

Ion Popescu-Gopo: 7 Arte/7 Arts and Sport (1958)

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19582D animation • 7 Arte • 7 Arts and Sport • animated short filmCannes Film Festivalcave paintingsgraphic artist • happy accident • imitationIon Popescu-GopomaskmythopoeticPalme dOrsporttheatrical expression

CONTRIBUTOR

Valeria Marti
12 FEBRUARY 2013

Reanimating cultural heritage: digital repatriation, knowledge networks and civil society strengthening in post-conflict Sierra Leone

"The Reanimating Cultural Heritage project reintroduced these objects to both Sierra Leoneans and a wider audience, thereby creating a platform for future recovery of the Sierra Leone cultural heritage sector. The project, led by Dr Paul Basu, created an innovative digital heritage resource to provide digital access to the Sierra Leonean collections of the project's partner institutions (the British Museum, Brighton Museum and Art Gallery, Glasgow Museums, World Museum Liverpool, the British Library Sound Archive, and the Sierra Leone National Museum). The resulting www.sierraleoneheritage.org resource provides high quality images and enhanced information for over 3,500 Sierra Leonean objects from these museum collections.

Taking seemingly 'lifeless' museum objects, gathering dust in little–visited stores or displays, the project 'reanimated' them digitally by showing them alongside contextualising video, images, sounds and other media, 'reanimating' a traditional mask, for example, through video footage of a masquerade dance performance. The majority of the videos were made by Sierra Leoneans themselves, following participatory videomaking workshops. This ensured that a wide range of Sierra Leonean voices could be heard, from school children to weavers to religious leaders. Through integrating social networking technologies into the resource, visitors are able to comment and engage in dialogue about the objects and associated cultural practices."

(Arts & Humanities Research Council, 04/09/2012)

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2012AHRCArts and Humanities Research Council • Brighton Museum and Art Gallery • British Library Sound Archive • British Museum • comment and engage • cultural heritagecultural practicesdance performance • dialogue about objects • digital access • digital heritage • digital heritage resource • engage in dialogue • Glasgow Museums • mask • masquerade • museum collectionsmuseum objects • participatory videomaking workshops • Paul Basu • re-animating • reanimating • Reanimating Cultural Heritage • research project • Sierra Leone • Sierra Leone National Museum • social networking technologies • World Museum Liverpoo

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JULY 2012

Maurizio Anzeri: embroidered patterns on found vintage photographs

"Maurizio Anzeri makes his portraits by sewing directly into found vintage photographs. His embroidered patterns garnish the figures like elaborate costumes, but also suggest a psychological aura, as if revealing the person's thoughts or feelings. The antique appearance of the photographs is often at odds with the sharp lines and silky shimmer of the threads. The combined media gives the effect of a dimension where history and future converge. The image used in Round Midnight is an early 20th century 'glamour shot' that at the time would have been considered titillating for both the girl's nudity and ethnicity. Anzeri's delicately stitched veil recasts the figure with an uncomfortable modesty, overlaying a past generation's cross–cultural anxieties with an allusion to our own.

'I've been collecting old photographs for a long time. A few years ago I was doing ink drawings with them and out of curiosity I stitched into one. I work a lot with threads and hand stitching, and the link to photography was a natural progression. I put tracing paper over the photo and draw on the face until it develops. Sometimes the image comes straight away, suggested by a detail on a dress or in the background, but with the majority of them I spend a lot of time drawing. Once the drawing is done, I pierce the photo with a set of needle–like tools I invented and take the paper away; the holes are obsessively paced at the same distance to convey an idea of geometry. When I begin the stitching something else happens, drawing will never do what thread will–the light changes, and at some points you can lose the face, and at others you can still see under it.'

'There's a dynamic in what happens between the photograph, the embroidery on top, and you standing in front looking at it. I try never to completely cover a face, you can always still see the face underneath. There are no rules other than I always leave one or both eyes open. Nothing is bigger in my head than a face, it's the best landscape we can look at. It's all to do with the centre, the body. Like a costume or other identity, my work reveals something that is behind the face that suddenly becomes in front. It's like a mask–not a mask you put on, but something that grows out of you. It's what the photo is telling you and what you want to read in the photos. I get my ideas from many different sources: it could be theatre, or someone dressed up on the tube, a tribe in Papua New Guinea, or Versace. It's never one specific thing.'

'Photographs from the 40s and 50s have a totally different quality from photos we're used to today. We don't recognise them as photographs now, they really look like watercolours or drawings. The images I use are anonymous, I find them everywhere; I'm really into flea markets and car boot sales, when you enter you have no idea what you're going to encounter. In everything I see there is something I am interested in, but I try to look at them as plain canvas. Art history is very important to me, it's all been done before but it's never been done by you: if you don't look into the past there is no chance to go into the future. The surrealist movement is important to my work, but I don't become obsessed by it, it's not dictating rules. I understand history in a formal respect, and think of past artists like travelling companions–making work is like going for a walk with them. At the end of the day it's about humanity.'"

(Saatchi Gallery)

Fig.1 Maurizio Anzeri, "Rita", 2011, Embroidery on photograph, 23.5 x 17.5 cm.

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antique • antique appearance • art history • car boot sales • costumecraft nostalgia • cross-cultural anxieties • design craftdesign revisionism • elaborate costumes • embroidered patternsembroidery • embroidery on photograph • facefigures • flea markets • foundfound imagesgeometryglamour shot • hand stitching • inner thoughts • making art with recycled materialsmask • Maurizio Anzeri • modesty • needle • nostalgia • old photographs • overlaying • photographportrait • psychological aura • Saatchi Gallerysewing • sharp lines • silky shimmer • stitchedstitching • surrealist movement • textile arts • threads • travelling companions • veiledvintage

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 SEPTEMBER 2009

Los Mono, Promesas: lo-fi motion-tracking music video

"A Chilean super–group, Los Mono is the collaborative effort from some of the top musicians/producers of the country: Cristian Moraga aka Funky C, (also released by Sonic360) is one of the most recognised musicians in Chile and, as founder of the 'Los Tetas', which was one of the most influential alternative bands that heralds from Santiago in the last decade with sales that garnered 4 Gold Records. Other members include Sebastian Silva (member of the popular Chilean band CHC), Gonzalo Gonzalez (acclaimed sound engineer –Los Prisioneros, Los Tres, Los Bunkers), Vicente Sanfuentes (as part of the duo 'The Hermanos Brothers', winner of MTV Latin America's 'Best Independent Artist' and Nea (singer from the bands CHC and Yaia)."
(Sonic360)

[This Los Mono music video uses lo–fi compositing and motion–tracking as a central feature.]

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2009After EffectsanimationappearanceaugmentationavatarChilecompositingdecorationembellishmentillustrationlo-fi • Los Mono • maskmonkeymotion-trackingmusic videooverlay • Promesas • Sonic360 • superimposition

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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