Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Discrimination' keyword pg.1 of 1
30 JULY 2014

Australian anti-discrimination campaign: Stop. Think. Respect.

"beyondblue's new national anti–discrimination campaign highlights the impact of racism on the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Research shows that subtle or 'casual' racism can be just as harmful as more overt forms. Imagine being judged in a job interview by the colour of your skin, rather than the strength of your CV. How would you feel if you were watched in a shop or treated differently on public transport?

Why should anyone be made to feel like crap, just for being who they are?

Stop. Think. Respect. encourages everyone in Australia to check their behaviour. Stop the discrimination, think about how your comments or actions could cause real distress and harm, and respect people who are different from you."

1
2
3

TAGS

2014Aboriginalad campaign • anti-discrimination • anxiety • attempted suicide • attitudesAustraliaawareness campaignawareness raisingbehaviour • Beyond Blue • casual discriminationcasual racismdepressiondiscriminationeveryday racism • footie • harmful effectsIndigenous Australiansmental healthmental wellbeing • passive racism • perceived threat • prejudiceracial discriminationracial inequality • racial injustice • racismrespectskin coloursubstance abuse • substance use • subtle racism • Torres Strait Islanderwellbeing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 JUNE 2013

A Class Divided: Jane Elliott's daring classroom experiment

"On the day after Martin Luther King was killed, I––one of my students came into the room and said they shot a king last night, Mrs. Elliott, why'd they shoot that king? I knew the night before that it was time to deal with this in a concrete way, not just talking about it, because we had talked about racism since the first day of school. But the shooting of Martin Luther King, who had been one of our heroes of the month in February, could not just be talked about and explained away. There was no way to explain this to little third graders in Riceville, Iowa. ...

I decided at that point that it was time to try the eye color thing, which I had thought about many, many times but had never used. So the next day I introduced an eye color exercise in my classroom and split the class according to eye color. And immediately created a microcosm of society in a third–grade classroom."

(Jane Elliott, 1985, PBS)

Frontline "A Class Divided": Season 3, Episode 9, A Class Divided (26 Mar. 1985), Director: William Peters, Writers: Charlie Cobb, William Peters.

1

TAGS

197019841985 • A Class Divided (1985) • ABC News (USA) • attitudes • Charlie Cobb • classroom • classroom experiment • colourcultural assumptionsdiscrimination • eye colour • human experimentationhuman subjects • Iowa • Jane Elliott • lives and attitudes • Martin Luther King • PBSprejudiceprimary schoolracial discriminationracial inequalityracism • Riceville • school pupilschool students • schoolteacher • simulation studysocial responsibility • subhuman • teacherthird gradetranscript • William Peters • women in pedagogy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 APRIL 2011

The Secret Country: The First Australians Fight Back

Alan Lowery and John Pilger's 1985 documentary "The Secret Country: The First Australians Fight Back" which describes the shameful history of persecution of the Aborigines in Australia.

1
2

3

4

TAGS

1985Alan Loweryancient peopleanimist belief systematrocitiesAustraliaAustralian Aborigine • Australian Radiation Laboratory • Captain Cook • Charlie Perkins • colonisationcultural hegemonycultural historycultural identitycultural resistanceculture and customs • David Gulpilil • desertdiscriminationdocumentary filmFirst Australians • Freda Thornton • genocideGough Whitlamhumiliation • Indigenous Australia • Indigenous AustraliansIndigenous peopleJohn Pilger • Keith Lokan • Kevin Kearney • land rights • malnutrition • Maralinga • Marcia Langton • Mario Fredericks • massacre • Mawuyul Yanthalawuy • native people • nigger hunt • noble savage • nuclear testing • persecution • Preston Clothier • racial inequality • Ray Henman • resistanceself-determinationTerra NulliusTorres Strait Islander • unoccupied land • Vince Forresterwhite settlement

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 OCTOBER 2009

Exploitation and Entrepreneurialism and the Star-Belly Sneetches

"Among my favorite Dr. Suess stories is his tale of the Sneetches. As you may recall, these beach–dwelling creatures came in two varieties. The Star–Belly Sneetches were a snobbish sort, and the Plain–Belly Sneetches longed be like them. So, when entrepreneur Sylvester McMonkey McBean showed up on the beach with his star–making machine, Plain–Bellies eagerly slapped down cash for a ride through this contraption. The result: Their bellies now sported stars, making them indistinguishable from those born with the mark.

The native Star–Bellies were none too pleased. To remain unique, they hurried to pay McBean for a trip through his star–off machine. Now the formerly starred were starless, leaving those who began life without stars regretting their new tattoos. So, they, too, took a trip through McBean's removal machine. Even if you don't know the story, you can figure out where it's headed.

As one class of Sneetches desperately sought to retain its exclusiveness, the other class sought just as desperately to pierce it. Each Sneetch paid for multiple passes through McBean's expensive machines, till all had run out of money and no one could tell one class from another. When McBean drove off the Sneetch beach that day a very rich man, he left behind a poorer, wiser, integrated society."

(Todd Temple, Boundless.org)

1

TAGS

class warfare • discrimination • Dr. Suess • economyentrepreneurentrepreneurship • exclusiveness • exclusivityexploitationfadfashionfashionable fadmoral talenaivety • rich vs. poor • Sneetches • social class • Star-Belly Sneetches • Sylvester McMonkey McBean • tattoo • Theodor Seuss Geise

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 OCTOBER 2008

How did the Guerrilla Girls come to be?

"In 1985, the Museum of Modern Art opened after a renovation; they opened with a big international show on sculpture. In the show there were, I always forget exact numbers, there were almost 200 artists and there were only 15 women, and there were no artists of colour. That was just so blatant and just so in your face. And as if that wasn't bad enough, the curator then made a statement to the press that anyone who wasn't in the show should rethink his career! And that gave us an idea [Laughs] that there was probably a little bit of discrimination going on here. [Laughs]

So, a group of us went up to the museum and organised a very ordinary kind of protest with placards and chants, and at the end of the day we hadn't really accomplished anything except make a lot of people coming in and out of the museum angry. They really didn't want to hear any kind of questioning of the cultural institution of the museum. That's when we realised that most people think that the art world, or at least at that time most people thought the art world was a meritocracy – that whatever ended up in a museum was the best there was. We were not exactly sure at that point how it all worked, but we knew that there was something wrong. And so a group of us decided that day that we were going to figure out some type of technique to expose it and make people think about the issue. And also participate in a dialogue about it.

That's when we decided to have an anonymous organisation and call ourselves Guerrillas, like freedom fighters, and put up anonymous posters in the middle of the night all over Soho, where the galleries were then, that just stated the facts. We put up posters that went after every sub group of the art world. First, we did the male artists that have shows in galleries that didn't show women, because a lot of them had women in their lives who were artists that weren't given the same opportunities. We went after galleries, we went after critics, we went after directors of museums, and we systematically put every separate group in the art world on alert that we were looking at their records and that they better do some explaining. Of course everyone wanted to say it was somebody else's problem. Artists wanted to say it was the galleries' problem. The galleries wanted to say it was the critics' problem. And the critics said, Oh, no, it's the galleries' fault because they never showed any women? Everyone was passing the buck. And we wanted to put them all on alert that they were all participating consciously or unconsciously in a system that discriminated against women and people of colour. And that the art world, as it existed then, in the mid–80s, did not fairly represent American culture."
(Celina, feministing.com)

TAGS

activismartdiscriminationfeminism • freedom fighters • Guerrilla GirlsmediaMoMAprotest

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.