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Which clippings match 'Cinematography' keyword pg.1 of 6
15 FEBRUARY 2015

1980s television commercial for Westpac Bank, Australia

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TAGS

1980sadadvertisement designAustraliabank • banking • cinematographycolour tintfilm editing • incomplete sentences • quick cutsselective focus • sentence fragments • shallow depth of fieldshallow focustelevision advertisement • television commercial • TVCWestpacWestpac Bank • Westpac Banking Corporation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 SEPTEMBER 2013

How to deal with the demands of the rapidly evolving new technology and yet further the aesthetics of our filmic art?

"With digital capture and even digital intermediates, it becomes very easy to think of the image in the simplest of terms: contrast, saturation and color bias. But I think too often we forget about texture and sharpness. Film has organic grain texture that simply doesn't exist in digital cinematography. I'm not a film 'purist' but I think it's safe to say that with the advent of radical advances in digital cinema technology there has been a certain homogenization of the cinematographic image in regard to look and texture. It is common to shoot for an evenly distributed rich digital negative (protect the highlights, see into the shadows) with plenty of sharpness to endure the color correction suite and create the look in post. Everybody shoots the sensor the same way.

Painting is a great influence on me. Whenever I can I go to museums and look at the classics, the Dutch masters, Rembrandt and Georges de la Tour. Looking at these old paintings can be inspiring. These are the basics for cameramen because we can learn lighting from them. We can study the classic paintings and try to use that technique of lighting in our photography. I have lots of picture books at home–photography books and art books. When we did McCabe and Mrs. Miller, I showed a book of Andrew Wyeth's paintings to Bob Altman and said, 'What do you think of these faded, soft, pastel images?' And he liked it. Then I took the same book to the lab and explained to them that this was what we were aiming for. They understood right away why we were flashing the film. So it helps; a picture is worth ten thousand words. A picture can immediately tell you your feelings about something.

With digital capture, we have been given a completely different set of tools, trading physical lab processes for computer–driven non–destructive techniques, creating possibilities for the image to be pushed any way we wish in post. In a time when film is disappearing fast and digital is making progress in image quality improvement, it has become important for cinematographers to master these new tools."

(Vilmos Zsigmond ASC HSC, IMAGO European Federation of Cinematographers)

TAGS

aesthetics • American Society of Cinematgraphers (ASC) • Andrew Wyeth • ARRI Alexas • art of colour • available lightcamera technologycinematographycolour • colour bias • colour correctioncolour saturation • colourist • computer-driven techniques • digital capturedigital cinema technologydigital cinematography • digital intermediates • digital negativedigital picturesdigital progressdigital technology • European Federation of Cinematographers • faded images • film grain • film grain texture • film lighting • filmic art • filmmaking • Georges de La Tour • GoProimage contrast • image highlights • image manipulation • image quality • image shadows • image sharpness • image tone • IMAGO European Federation of Cinematographers • iPhone cinematographyKodak Eastman • lab process • light exposure • look and texture • low lightmaking process • McCabe and Mrs Miller (1971) • mobile video productionnew technology • non-destructive techniques • organic grain texture • painting with light • pastel colours • post-productionpre-productionrapid technological changeRED ONERembrandt van Rijn • retraining • Robert Altman • soft image quality • Sony camerataste (sociology) • taste cultivation • taste formations • Vilmos Zsigmond • visual compositionvisual representation • visual richness • visual sensibilityvisual storytelling • visual texture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JANUARY 2013

The Last Picture Show: stark black and white cinematography

"Bogdanovich's coming of age story, set in 1950s rural Texas, is an achingly accurate portrayal of small–town life and the compromises and disappointments that mark the passage from adolescence to adulthood. In contrast to his contemporaries, who experimented with style and new filmmaking techniques inspired by the French New Wave, Bogdanovich looked back to classical Hollywood, utilizing stark black and white cinematography, deep focus and a traditional narrative structure. The film is striking in its lack of nostalgia for the past, focusing instead on the desperation of a dying community and way of life, embodied by the shuttering of the lonely movie house."

(Harvard Film Archive)

"The Last Picture Show", Directed by Peter Bogdanovich. With Timothy Bottoms, Jeff Bridges, Cybill Shepherd. US 1971, 35mm, b/w, 118 min.

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TAGS

1950sadolescenceadulthoodblack and whitecinematography • classical Hollywood • compromises • Cybill Shepherddeep focusdesperation • disappointment • dying community • French New Wave • Harvard Film Archive • Jeff Bridges • John Schlesinger • lack of nostalgia for the past • loneliness • mark the passage • Mel Brooks • movie house • movie theatre • new filmmaking techniques • Peter Bogdanovichrural • rural Texas • shuttering • small town • small town life • stark • stark black and white cinematography • Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971) • TexasTimothy Bottoms • traditional narrative structure • way of life

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 OCTOBER 2012

Rosemarys Baby: editing through frame selection

"Rosemary's Baby is a 1968 American horror film written and directed by Roman Polanski, based on the bestselling 1967 novel by Ira Levin. ... Farrow plays an expecting mother who fears that her husband may have made a pact with their eccentric neighbours, believing he may have promised them the child to be used as a human sacrifice in their occultic rituals in exchange for success in his acting career."

(Zach James and Rich Raddon, Movieclips)

Fig.1 excerpt from "Visions of Light" (1992), Arnold Glassman, Todd McCarthy and Stuart Samuels [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0105764/]

[Jump to 7:54 to see Polanski's skilful use of framing to heighten the audience's interest and sense of intrigue.]

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TAGS

1968 • anagram • apartmentbaby • Charles Grodin • child • cinematic frame • cinematographycompositioncult • demonic presence • devil • door frame • editing through selection • Emmaline Henry • expecting mother • frameframed by the windowframinghorror filmhousewife • human sacrifice • Ira Levin • John Cassavetes • Maurice Evans • Mia Farrow • mise-en-scenemysterious • narrative immersion • neighbour • obscured • obscured viewoccult • occultic ritual • pregnancy • pregnant • psychological horror • Ralph Bellamy • raperitual • Roman Polanski • Rosemary • Rosemarys Baby • Ruth Gordon • satan • Sidney Blackmer • tannis root • Visions of Light (documentary)visual designvisual intriguevisual perspective • William Fraker • window frame • witch • witchcraft

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 OCTOBER 2012

Loom: Blade Runner style 4K short film by Luke Scott

"He is an acclaimed commercial director who has pushed through his work to step out of the shadow of his father, Ridley Scott. And now Luke Scott is transcending boundaries in video technology with a visually–arresting 20–minute short film, Loom. Shot in coordination with RED Camera, the sci–fi short features Giovanni Ribisi and Jellybean Howie, although cinematographer Dariusz Wolski just might be its star.

The film follows Ribisi's character Tommy – a lab tech who genetically modifies meat and begins a dangerous at–home experiment he struggles to perfect. It ends with a monologue taken from the conclusion of Darwin's Origin of Species, leaving many of the story's questions left unanswered. 'There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved,' says Howie's character.

Visually, Scott – who directs for his father's production company RSA – gives nod to the filmmaker's 1982 classic Blade Runner, shooting the piece in the tone and style of the dystopian thriller. Constructed for 3D, the piece was crafted to test the limits of the colour range and exposure, allowing viewers to see fine details often lost in dark scenes.

RED initially presented Loom at the 2012 National Association of Broadcasters [NAB] Show this past April. The company has since continued to screen the film, and on Wednesday President Jarred Land released it online via REDUSER, with a disclaimer for cinephiles."

(Jennifer Madison, 31 August 2012, Mail Online)

Fig. 1 published on 28 Aug 2012 by ENTV, YouTube

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TAGS

20124K • 4K 3D • 4K projection • bio-ethicsbiotechnologyBlade Runner (1982)Charles Darwincinematographycolour • colour range • commercials director • cultured meat • Dariusz Wolski • diseasedystopian future • dystopian thriller • Epic RED • film exposure • fine detail • genetic manipulation • genetically modified meat • genetics • Giovanni Ribisi • HDin vitro meat • Jellybean Howie • lab tech • laser projector • loom • Loom (film) • Los Angeles Short Fest • Luke Scott • mutant science • NAB (acronym) • National Association of Broadcasters • Origin of Species • RED Camera • RED ONE • REDUSER • Ridley Scott • RSA (production company) • sci-fisci-fi short filmscience-fiction • shmeat • short filmvideo technologyvisual spectacle

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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