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Which clippings match 'Painter' keyword pg.2 of 2
03 SEPTEMBER 2011

Les Enfants Terribles: Illustrator Robert Williams

"This alternative art movement found its most congealing participant in one of America's most opprobrious and maligned underground artists, the painter, Robert Williams. It was this artist to brought the term 'lowbrow' into the fine arts lexicon, with his ground breaking book of 1979, The Lowbrow Art of Robert Williams. It was from this point, that the seminal elements of West Coast Outlaw culture slowly started to aggregate."

(Robert Williams)

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anthropomorphismartart and design practitionersart worldartistCalifornia • car culture • cartoonist • cinematic apocalypticism • comiccomic bookcomic book artistcounterculturecreaturedeviancefreaks • Gilbert Shelton • graphics • hot rod • hot rodding • illustrationillustrative styleillustratorinterviewJuxtapoz Magazine • Kenny Howard • Les Enfants Terribles • lowbrow • lowbrow art • Lowbrow Art Movement • painterphotocopypop culture artpop surrealismpop-culturepractitioner interviewpsychedelicpsychedelic imagerypunk • punk rock art • Robert Crumb • Robert Williams • Robt Williams • Salvador DalitransgressiontrashundergroundUSA • Von Dutch • Xerox • Zap Collective

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JUNE 2011

North American Progress: expansion as a spiritualised feminine figure

"George Crofutt, publisher of a fashionable western travel guide series, commissioned the creation of 'American Progress' by the Brooklyn resident, painter, and lithographer, John Gast. Crofutt reproduced the petite painting, done in 1872, as a color lithograph poster and also engraved the image in the guidebooks he published widely circulating the image. The painting depicts a sense of technological development's advancement upon the untamed land like the coming of an impenetrable, inevitable militia with one uncharacteristic exception––the company is led by a feminine figure.

In the wake of four years of Civil War, the creation of the promotional material of 'American Progress' portrays a spiritualized feminine that provides nurturing, protective guidance and fortitude for the extension of civilization over wilderness and the 'uncivilized,' the enigmatic, and the primal. Disembodied, the idealized feminine portrays the evolution of the split of spirit from daily life as well as the sanctified superiority of the immigrants above human beings who lived in harmony with the spirit of the land.

The dominating and centralized angelic being's paradoxical innocence and sensually alluring presence has the effect of distracting and softening the reality and the violence of this movement to 'win the west' where Native Americans depart the frame as non– natives stake claims in the form of prospectors, as settlers: farmers, homesteaders, and travelers. One of the popular artists of the times, Maynard Dixon speaks of the untruth of the romanticized representation of facts as he complained he was being paid to lie in his artwork and portrayals of life on the wild prairie (Dixon).

Fueled by an underlying desire to be free from tyrannical government and the prospect of a new life and livelihood in a world new to them, Euro–Americans manifested suffering and persecution similar to the very situation they sought to escape."

(Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism)

Fig.1 John Gast (1872). "American Progress", painting: oil

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1872 • American Progress (painting) • ARAS • Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism • artworkcivil war • civilising • colonial expansioncolonisationcolour lithographdivine destinydivine providenceexpansionism • farmers • feminine figure • George Crofutt • guidebook • homesteaders • ideologyIndigenous • John Gast • manifest destiny • Maynard Dixon • national park • Native AmericansnativesNorth Americanurturingpainterpainting • popular artist • poster • prairie • progresspromotional material • protective guidance • romantic sublimeromanticised • sanctified superiority • settlementspiritualsymbolismtechnological developmentterritoryThe West • travel guide series • travellers • uncivilised • untamed land • untamed wilderness • wildwilderness

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 FEBRUARY 2010

Giuseppe Arcimboldo: Vertumnus

"Giuseppe Arcimboldo (also spelled Arcimboldi; 1527 – July 11, 1593) was an Italian painter best known for creating imaginative portrait heads made entirely of such objects as fruits, vegetables, flowers, fish, and books – that is, he painted representations of these objects on the canvas arranged in such a way that the whole collection of objects formed a recognisable likeness of the portrait subject.

Arcimboldo was born in Milan in 1527, the son of Biagio, a painter who did work for the office of the Fabbrica in the Duomo. Arcimboldo was commissioned to do stained glass window designs beginning in 1549, including the Stories of St. Catherine of Alexandria vitrage at the Duomo. In 1556 he worked with Giuseppe Meda on frescoes for the Cathedral of Monza. In 1558, he drew the cartoon for a large tapestry of the Dormition of the Virgin Mary, which still hangs in the Como Cathedral today."

(www.Giuseppe–Arcimboldo.org)

Fig.1 Giuseppe Arcimboldo (Italian, ca. 1527–1593). Vertumnus (Portrait of Rudolf II), 1590. Oil on panel. 70.5 x 57.5 cm (27 3/4 x 22 5/8 in.). Photo: Samuel Uhrdin.

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1527 • Arcimboldi • artart historycreative practice • Emperor Rudolf II • fishflowersfruitGiuseppe Arcimboldographic representationhistoryimagination • Italian painter • Milanoptical illusionpainterpaintingspectacleSwedenvegetablesVertumnaliaVertumnusvisual depictionvisual designvisual pun

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 OCTOBER 2008

Jarman's Caravaggio: injection of period anachronisms

"Arguably the director's most approachable film, Caravaggio feels like a work more concerned with tone and texture than storytelling. The narrative does move in a coherent fashion if one is paying attention, but the succession of ravishing images ultimately overwhelms the senses to the extent that any character development is secondary. Jarman's usual idiosyncracies are in evidence, such as his injection of period anachronisms (modern formal dress, typewriters, and so on) at odd moments to provide modern analogies"
(Nathaniel Thompson)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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