Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Mise-en-scene' keyword pg.1 of 5
08 OCTOBER 2015

Taking re-focusable photos with the Lytro Illum camera

"LYTRO ILLUM is the first high-end camera to harness the entire light field – to retain the richness and depth of a scene. Explore focus, perspective, and depth of field within a single image and render full-color, 3-D living pictures. Use the Lytro Desktop application to adjust a wide range of photographic parameters, including the scene's depth of field, and transform those pictures into immersive cinematic animations."

(Lytro, Inc.)

1
2
3

4

TAGS

angular variation • camera • depth information • depth of fielddepth of focusdepth-sensing cameradigital cameradirectional information • focal distance • focus spread • image capture • image focus • image sensor • interactive photography • interactive re-focusable pictures • light field • light field camera • light field technology • light rays • light-field photography • live view • living pictures • Lytro Illum • megaray • megaray sensor • mise-en-scenenarrative photographyperspective viewphotography • plenoptic camera • plenoptic image • plenoptic photography • point of focus • post-processing • post-shot refocusing • re-editable • re-focusable • refocus • refocused • refocusing • relative focus • Ren Ng • stereophotography • two-dimensional representation • visual spectacle

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JANUARY 2014

Reconstructing the proscenium arch in Jeff Desom's Rear Window

"I dissected all of Hitchcock's Rear Window and stiched it back together in After Effects. I stabilized all the shots with camera movement in them. Since everything was filmed from pretty much the same angle I was able to match them into a single panoramic view of the entire backyard without any greater distortions. The order of events stays true to the movie's plot."

(Jeff Desom)

Jeff Desom "REAR WINDOW LOOP" (2010), based on footage from Alfred Hitchcock's "Rear Window" (1954). Duration: 20 minutes, 2400x600 pixels.

1
2

3

4

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
18 DECEMBER 2012

Verknipte tijden / Distorted times

Fig.1 Gideon van der Stelt (2012). "Verknipte tijden / Distorted times", collage of existing film fragments, released into my paper–folded version of Utrecht. Shot on a 7D and processed in After Effects.

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Andy Love
21 OCTOBER 2012

Rosemarys Baby: editing through frame selection

"Rosemary's Baby is a 1968 American horror film written and directed by Roman Polanski, based on the bestselling 1967 novel by Ira Levin. ... Farrow plays an expecting mother who fears that her husband may have made a pact with their eccentric neighbours, believing he may have promised them the child to be used as a human sacrifice in their occultic rituals in exchange for success in his acting career."

(Zach James and Rich Raddon, Movieclips)

Fig.1 excerpt from "Visions of Light" (1992), Arnold Glassman, Todd McCarthy and Stuart Samuels [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0105764/]

[Jump to 7:54 to see Polanski's skilful use of framing to heighten the audience's interest and sense of intrigue.]

1

TAGS

1968 • anagram • apartmentbaby • Charles Grodin • child • cinematic frame • cinematographycompositioncultdemonic presencedevil • door frame • editing through selection • Emmaline Henry • expecting mother • frameframed by the windowframinghorror filmhousewife • human sacrifice • Ira Levin • John Cassavetes • Maurice Evans • Mia Farrow • mise-en-scenemysterious • narrative immersion • neighbour • obscured • obscured viewoccult • occultic ritual • pregnancy • pregnant • psychological horror • Ralph Bellamy • raperitual • Roman Polanski • Rosemary • Rosemarys Baby • Ruth Gordon • satan • Sidney Blackmer • tannis root • Visions of Light (documentary)visual designvisual intriguevisual perspective • William Fraker • window frame • witch • witchcraft

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 SEPTEMBER 2012

Screenwriting: the two worlds of your screenplay

"When we watch a movie, we enter a world created by the screenwriter. From the very first scene, events and characters begin to define a world, set in time and place, with implied values and social nuances. However, this initial world we see early on is only the first of two worlds that the screenwriter will create to tell the story."

(Charles Deemer, Film Underground)

Fig.1 publicity still for "Life of Pi"

1

TAGS

call to action • catalytic moment • defining a world • entering a world • everyman • extraordinary world (screenwriting) • inciting event • leaving the ordinary world • main character • making choices • mise-en-scenenarrative theory • ordinary world (screenwriting) • passive protagonist • proactive characters • protagonist • reactive characters • screenwritingsetting • story moment • story world • time and place • world of the story

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.