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Which clippings match 'Research Question' keyword pg.1 of 1
31 MARCH 2013

Qualitative research primarily is inductive in its procedures

"qualitative inquiry is inductive and often iterative in that the evaluator may go through repeated cycles of data collection and analysis to generate hypotheses inductively from the data. These hypotheses, in turn, need to be tested by further data collection and analysis. The researcher starts with a broad research question, such as 'What effects will information systems engendered by reforms in the UK's National Health Service have on relative power and status among clinical and administrative staff in a teaching hospital?' [48].The researcher narrows the study by continually posing increasingly specific questions and attempting to answer them through data already collected and through new data collected for that purpose. These questions cannot all be anticipated in advance. As the evaluator starts to see patterns, or discovers behavior that seems difficult to understand, new questions arise. The process is one of generating hypotheses and explanations from the data, testing them, and modifying them accordingly. New hypotheses may require new data, and, consequently, potential changes in the research design."

(Bonnie Kaplan and Joseph A. Maxwell, p.38, 2005)

Kaplan, B. and J. Maxwell (2005). Qualitative Research Methods for Evaluating Computer Information Systems. Evaluating the Organizational Impact of Healthcare Information Systems. J. Anderson and C. Aydin. New York, Springer: 30–55.

TAGS

Bonnie Kaplandata analysisdata collectiondata collection and analysis • generating explanations • generating hypotheses • hypothesishypothesis testinginductive enquiryinductive proceduresinductive reasoningiterative cycleJoseph Maxwellpatterns of meaning • qualitative enquiry • qualitative researchresearch designresearch questionresearcher • specific questions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 JANUARY 2013

The Qualitative Research Interview

"While all interviews are used to get to know the interviewee better, the purpose of that knowing varies according to the research question and the disciplinary perspective of the researcher. Thus, some research is designed to test a priori hypotheses, often using a very structured interviewing format in which the stimulus (questions) and analyses are standardised, while other research seeks to explore meaning and perceptions to gain a better understanding and/or generate hypotheses. This latter research generally requires some form of qualitative interviewing which encourages the interviewee to share rich descriptions of phenomena while leaving the interpretation or analysis to the investigators. The purpose of the qualitative research interview is to contribute to a body of knowledge that is conceptual and theoretical and is based on the meanings that life experiences hold for the interviewees. In this article we review different qualitative interview formats with a focus on the face–to–face, in–depth qualitative research interview and conclude with a discussion of related technical and ethical issues."

(Barbara DiCicco–Bloom and Benjamin F. Crabtree, 2006)

Barbara DiCicco–Bloom and Benjamin F. Crabtree (2006). "The Qualitative Research Interview", Medical Education, Volume 40, Issue 4, pages 314–321, Wiley Online Library

TAGS

a priori hypotheses • Barbara DiCicco-Bloom • Benjamin Crabtree • body of knowledge • disciplinary perspective • ethical issues • explore meaning • explore perceptions • face-to-faceface-to-face interview • generate hypotheses • in-depth interview • interpretationinterview (research method)interviewinginterviews • investigators • life experiences • qualitative data • qualitative interview formats • qualitative interviewing • qualitative interviewsqualitative research • qualitative research interview • researchresearch interviewsresearch questionrich descriptions • standardised data • structured interviewing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 OCTOBER 2008

What is a literature review?

"A literature review is the review of a collection of published research relevant to a research question. All good research and writing is guided by a review of the relevant literature.
...

the purpose of the literature review remains the same. It is an essential test of the research question against that which is already known about the subject.

The literature review reveals whether or not a research question has already been answered by someone else. If it has, often the question needs to be changed or modified, so that an original contribution to the research is made.

What are some tips for literature review research?

Focus the search.
Having the research question written down, and on hand, can prevent inefficient wandering into research areas unrelated to the subject.

When to narrow the search.
If too many citations appear for a question then it is too broad, and a more focused question needs to be asked.

When to broaden the search.
If few citations appear for a question, then the topic is too narrow. Perhaps the question needs to be broadened.

Conduct a systematic search.
If little research has been done in an area, then a systematic search is necessary. One option is journals that print abstracts in a subject area which can provide an overview of the scope of the available literature. Other options are a general source, such as a book, or a specific source, such as a research paper, which can provide a starting point and a list of references to begin investigating.

Take thorough notes.
Taking thorough notes saves research time, as references can be quickly accessed again. (Suggestion: open a document in WordPad (Windows) or SimpleText (Macintosh) while running a computer search, and toggle back and forth between the search screen and document to record findings)."
(Union Institute & University)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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