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Which clippings match 'Crisps' keyword pg.1 of 1
28 MARCH 2015

Make informed purchasing decisions using Palm Oil barcode scanner

"POI (Palm Oil Investigations) has launched a Palm Oil barcode scanner for Australia and New Zealand products. ...

Scan the product barcode. Read the palm oil status. Select an alternative ethical product. Send a pre-written email to the company. Hit buy to compile ethical purchasing percentages and share your percentage to social media so you can show how you are making a difference.

Around 40% of products on supermarket shelves contain palm oil. Palm oil is a common ingredient in food (Biscuits, bakery items, Ice Cream, Chocolate, Confectionery, Crisps, Margarine, Health food bars, Cereals) etc. Derivatives of the oil are common in personal care products (Shampoo, Conditioner, Soaps, Skin care, Toothpaste) as well as household cleaning and detergents.

Rarely labelled by its correct name, palm oil is the hidden ingredient. There are over 200 names for palm oil its derivatives, the most common is the generic term vegetable oil. Other common names used in food production are emulsifier 471 and humectant glycerol."

(Palm Oil Investigations)

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TAGS

alternative ethical products • Android appsAotearoa New ZealandAustralia • bakery items • barcode scannerbarcode scanner appbiodiversitybiscuit • Borneo • cereals • certification status • chocolate • co-exist in the wild • confectionery • consumer advocacyconsumer products in homecrisps • critically endangered species • derivatives • detergentecosystem • El Paso Zoo • elephant • emulsifier • endangered speciesethical consumption • ethical palm oil supply • ethical purchasingextinction • facing extinction • free software • habitat loss • hair conditioner • health food bars • hidden ingredient • household detergents • humectant glycerol • ice cream • industry regulation • iOS appsmargarine • oil palm plantations • orangutanpalm oil • palm oil content • Palm Oil Investigations (POI) • palm oil scanner app • palm oil status • palm oil usage • personal care products • POI Palm Oil Barcode Scanner • product barcode • purchasing decisions • rhinorhinoceros • SE Asia • shampoo • skin care • soaps • South-East Asia • Spectrum Solutions • Sumatra • supermarket shelvessupply chaintiger • toothpaste • tropical forestvegetable oil • virgin rainforest

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 MARCH 2014

US Corn Refiners seek to sweeten image through product rename

"High fructose corn syrup, essentially a liquid alternative to sugar that is derived from corn kernels, is known in Europe as glucose–fructose syrup or isoglucose. Thousands of popular foods, ranging from crisps to bread products, sweets and prepared meals, contain the ingredient. But sales have fallen sharply in the US amid attacks on the substance by campaigners who link it to America's twin epidemics of obesity and diabetes."

(Andrew Clark, 15 September 2010, The Guardian)

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TAGS

2010 • American Medical Association • Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) • Audrae Erickson • bakery products • beet sugar • branding makeover • bread • candy • cane sugar • Cargill Inc • Centre for Science in the Public Interest • corn • corn kernel • Corn Refiners Association • corn starch • corn sugar • corn syrup • CRA • crisps • diabetes • drinks and snacks • food • Food and Drug Administration (FDA) • food companies • food ingredientfood production • fructose • fructose corn syrup • Gatorade • glucose • glucose syrup • glucose-fructose • glucose-fructose syrup • health awarenesshealth riskhealthy habits • HFCS • high fructose corn syrup • high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) • high fructose maize syrup • isoglucose • name change • natural ingredient • nutritionobesity • pre-cooked meals • pre-prepared mealsproduct rebrandingre-brandre-branding • rebranding • soda pop • soglucose • Starbuckssubstance • sucrose • sugar • sweet tooth • sweetener • sweets • syrup • Tate and Lyle • The Guardian • ubiquitous sweetening ingredient • US Corn Refiners Association (CRA)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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