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Which clippings match 'Campaign Advertising' keyword pg.1 of 1
06 JUNE 2019

Astroturfing: corporate interests disguised as spontaneous popular movements

"The term 'astroturfing' is a play on the term 'grassroots movement,' since the grass is fake. Astroturfing has been attempted by online businesses who present a product as being highly desired and sought out by a certain customer base via company-sponsored message board posts, blogs or articles when there is no evidence to support such an assertion."

(BigCommerce)

1

TAGS

advocacy groups • astroturf kingpin • astroturfing • astroturfing (phenomenon) • authentic response • authenticitybaseless claimsbelieving lies to be true • block legislation • campaign advertisingcognitive dissonanceconservative ideologyconservative think tankcontradictory narratives • controversial practice • corporate behaviour • corporate bullying • corporate lobbyingcorporations • corrupt practices • credibility • deceitful practices • deceitfulnessdeceptiondeliberate intention to misleaddiscrediting expertsdishonestydrunk drivingemotive manipulation • Employment Policy Institute • fake • fake grass-roots • fake grassroots movements • fake news • fake personas • fake reviews • fallacious argumentsfalse claims • falsified testimony • food safetygrass rootsgrassroots movement • hidden funding • illusion and reality • illusion of a populist idea. • inference • John Oliver • Last Week Tonight • Last Week Tonight with John Oliver HBO • lobbying • lobbyist • marketing practicesmemesmetaphorical representation • minimum wage • misleading message • misleading practices • mistruths • non-profit front groups • outreach • oversimplification • paid sick leave • perception management • pretending to be unbiased • public advocacy groups • public interest • public outreach • public-interest groups • Richard Berman • Rick Berman • secondhand cigarette smoke • sockpuppets • spontaneous popular movements • testimonies • the illusion of authenticity • undercover marketingunethical behaviourwhat is really happening

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MARCH 2014

Norman Kirk split-screen political ad for 1969 NZ general election

"This 1969 advertisement for the Labour Party emphasised the leadership qualities of Norman Kirk and sought to capitalise on a public mood for change as that turbulent decade drew to a close. It screened in full colour in cinemas and in black–and–white on television (colour TV wasn't introduced until 1973). Its striking split–screen imagery and pop–styled theme song were clearly aimed at younger voters, a potentially important audience in an election when the voting age was lowered from 21 to 20 (it would be reduced further, to 18, in 1974). It was not enough, however, to oust Keith Holyoake's National government, which had ruled for the previous nine years."

TAGS

1969advertisementAotearoa New Zealandcampaign advertisingcinematic techniqueColenso BBDO • dancing Cossacks (political TV ad) • film techniquegeneral electionintra-frame • Keith Holyoake • Labour governmentLabour Party • mood for change • National (political party) • Norman Kirk • optical printing • political advertising • Prime MinisterRobert Muldoonsplit-screenThomas Crown Affair (1968) • turbulent decade • TV commercial

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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