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Which clippings match 'Technology Design' keyword pg.1 of 1
06 APRIL 2014

State of Design: How Design Education Must Change

"But design faces an uncertain future. The traditional design fields create artifacts. But new societal challenges, cultural values, and technological opportunities require new skills. Design today is more human–centered and more social, more rooted in technology and science than ever before. Moreover, there is need for services and processes that do not require the great craft skills that are the primary outcome of a design education.

Although design can sometimes bring creative insight to new problems, this ability is more of an art than a science, limited to a few especially talented individuals and design firms. In order to expand beyond chance successes, design needs better tools and methods, more theory, more analytical techniques, and more understanding of how art and science, technology and people, theory and practice can commingle effectively and productively. ...

Design is still mainly taught as a craft. There are remarkably few fundamental principles, almost no science. If design is to live up to its promise it must create new, enduring curricula for design education that merge science and technology, art and business, and indeed, all the knowledge of the university. Design is an all–encompassing field that integrates together business and engineering, the social sciences and the arts. We see a tremendous opportunity for students that learn design in this integrated way. ...

For design to succeed, grow, achieve its potential, and train future leaders, we envision a new curriculum. In our vision, these new programs combine learning the art and craft of beautiful, pleasurable well–crafted design with substantive courses in the social and biological sciences, in technology, mathematics and statistics, and in the understanding of experimental methods and rigorous reasoning. Programming and mechatronics are essential skills in today's product world. Not only will this training make for better practitioners, but it will also equip future generations of designers to be better at developing the hard, rigorous theory design requires.

Design is an exciting powerful field, filled with promise. To meet the challenges of the 21st century, design and design education must change. So too must universities."

(Don Norman and Scott Klemmer, 25 March 2014)

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TAGS

2014 • analytical techniques • analytical thinkingart and design education • behavioural sciences • call to actioncomplex phenomenacraft and materialscraft skills • creative insight • creative leaders • deductive reasoning • design academics • design and visual culturedesign artefactsdesign craftdesign curriculadesign curriculumdesign educationdesign education must changedesign facultydesign methodsdesign pedagogydesign studio educationdesign theory • design theory and practice • design thinkingdisciplinary specialisationDonald Normanexperimental methodsexperimental type design • finding and solving problems • formal design methodsfundamental principlesinductive reasoningintegrative practicesinterdisciplinary knowledge • LinkedIn Influencers (series) • material practicesmateriality of artefacts • mechatronics • people and society • people and technology • practical theory • practice and theorypractitioner wisdomquestioning traditionsScott Klemmersynthetic thinkingsystematic approachsystems thinking • technology and people • technology designtheory and practicetheory of designthinking toolsuncertain future • well-crafted design

CONTRIBUTOR

Linda Carroli
23 FEBRUARY 2014

Local Projects: growing new audiences through technology

"Local Projects was tasked with growing new audiences through technology for the Cleveland Museum of Art, and created 'Gallery One,' a suite of new interactives that transform the Art Museum experience. Visitors can explore digital versions of the artworks, gathering ideas, and seeing the original context of the artworks themselves. Rather then simply bask in the reflection of others' artworks, visitors to Gallery One create their own works of art, and understand creativity by being creative themselves. Through interactive games, visitors can put their own bodies into the experience, matching poses with figurative sculptures, or browse the museum's collection by making different facial gestures. All of these interfaces are experiences that invite visitors to understand art and art–making through intuition, play and creativity. For those who do not like technology, the traditional design of the galleries means that the interactives are opt–in and do not circumvent the art gallery experience. An expansive interactive wall allows multiple visitors to see all 3,000 artworks on display at the same time, inviting them to curate their own experiences by exploring connections between artworks. Custom tours can be connected to a new iPad application that allows visitors to both navigate the museum through a Director's tour and take tours made by other visitors. Gallery One at the Cleveland Museum of Art will change how visitors understand the artworks and themselves."

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TAGS

2013art gallery experienceart museum • Cleveland Museum of Art • collaborative storytellingDiller Scofidio + Renfro • emotional storytelling • environmental graphic design • environmental media • Frank Gehry • Gallery One (museum space) • interaction designinteractive gamesinteractive wallinteractive worksinteractives • iPad application • Jacob Barton • Local Projects (media design) • media design • multi-touch screenmuseum • physical design • physical spacetechnology design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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