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23 FEBRUARY 2014

Beautiful Science: Picturing Data, Inspiring Insight

20 February – 26 May 2014, Folio Society Gallery; admission free, London.

"Turning numbers into pictures that tell important stories and reveal the meaning held within is an essential part of what it means to be a scientist. This is as true in today's era of genome sequencing and climate models as it was in the 19th century.

Beautiful Science explores how our understanding of ourselves and our planet has evolved alongside our ability to represent, graph and map the mass data of the time.

From John Snow's plotting of the 1854 London cholera infections on a map to colourful depictions of the tree of life, discover how picturing scientific data provides new insight into our lives."

(The British Library)

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17th century • 1854 • 185819th centurybattlefield • Beautiful Science (exhibition) • big dataBritish Librarycartographychart • cholera • climate models • climate science • colourful depictions • Crimean War • datadata journalismdata visualisation • David McCandless • David Spiegelhalter • diseaseevolutionexhibition • Florence Nightingale • genome • genome sequencing • graph • Great Chain of Being (1617) • hierarchical visualisationhospitalillustrated diagramsinfographicinteractive visualisationinterpret meaningsinterpreting data • Johanna Kieniewicz • John Snow • London • Luke Howard • maps • Martin Krzywinski • mass data • Nigel ShadboltOpen Data Institute • picturing data • picturing scientific data • public health • Robert Fludd • rose diagram • Sally Daviesscience • science collections • science exhibition • seeing is believing • statisticstechnological changetree of lifeturning numbers into meaningvisual interpretationvisual representationvisual representation graphicallyvisual representations of scientific conceptsvisualising dataweather • William Farr • Winton Capita

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JULY 2009

Mitochondrial DNA sequences in ancient Australians: Implications for modern human origins

"Lake Mungo 3 is the oldest (Pleistocene) 'anatomically modern' human from whom DNA has been recovered. His mtDNA belonged to a lineage that only survives as a segment inserted into chromosome 11 of the nuclear genome, which is now widespread among human populations. This lineage probably diverged before the most recent common ancestor of contemporary human mitochondrial genomes. This timing of divergence implies that the deepest known mtDNA lineage from an anatomically modern human occurred in Australia; analysis restricted to living humans places the deepest branches in East Africa. The other ancient Australian individuals we examined have mtDNA sequences descended from the most recent common ancestor of living humans. Our results indicate that anatomically modern humans were present in Australia before the complete fixation of the mtDNA lineage now found in all living people. Sequences from additional ancient humans may further challenge current concepts of modern human origins."

(Gregory Adcock, Elizabeth Dennis, Simon Easteal, Gavin Huttley, Lars Jermiin, William Peacock and Alan Thorne)

Adcock, G. J., E. S. Dennis, et al. (2001). "Mitochondrial DNA sequences in ancient Australians: Implications for modern human origins." Archaeology in Oceania 36(3): 163-163.

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19742001Aboriginal AustraliansAfrica • Alan Thorne • alternative explanation • anatomically modern human • ancient DNA • ancient humans • ancient peoplearchaeology • Archaeology in Oceania • AsiaAustraliaAustralian National University • bone fragments • burial ritual • cell biologychromosome • common ancestor • cremated remains • divergence • divergent selection • divergent variation • DNAEast Africa • Elizabeth Dennis • emergence of modern humans • Europe • evolutionary lineage • evolutionary process • evolutionary theoryevolutionary tree • female skeleton • fixation • fossil evidence • fossil specimen • Gavin Huttley • genetic lineage • genetic pool • genetic relationship • genetic sequence • genome • genotyping analysis • Gregory Adcock • Homo erectus • Homo sapiens • human evolutionhuman history • human populations • human speciesIndiaIndigenous Australians • Lake Mungo • Lars Jermiin • living humans • Mamanwa people • mitochondria • mitochondrial genome • modern human origins • mtDNA lineage • multiregional evolution • multiregional explanation • multiregional origin of modern humans hypothesis • Mungo Lady • Mungo Man • New South Walesochre • origin of modern humans • out-of-Africa hypothesis • Papua New GuineaPeoples Republic of China • pleistocene • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) • Simon Easteal • simultaneous development • skeletal remains • skeletonSouth East Asianspeciation • subspecies • William Peacock

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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