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Which clippings match 'Green Design' keyword pg.1 of 1
23 MARCH 2017

Ten years of smartphones (and visions of a circular economy)

"Smartphones sind schlecht zu reparieren, schlecht aufzurüsten, schlecht zu recyceln. Für die Konsumentinnen ist das ärgerlich – und kann für die Hersteller richtig teuer werden. ...

Dass Mobiltelefone eine längere Lebensdauer haben, ist aber ein wichtiger Beitrag zum Umweltschutz: Für ihre Herstellung werden Edelmetalle und so genannte Seltene Erden gebraucht, die unter grossem Energieaufwand und mittels gesundheitsschädigender Chemikalien gefördert werden. Jedes reparierte Telefon schont Ressourcen. Im Auftrag von Greenpeace berechnete das deutsche Oeko-Institut, dass sich die Smartphone-Lebensdauer im Schnitt um 1,5 Jahre verlängern liesse. Nimmt man all das zusammen – Energieaufwand, kurze Lebensspanne und geringe Recyclingquote – wird klar, dass es so nicht endlos weitergehen kann."

(Greenpeace Schweiz, 1 March 2017)

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TAGS

20072017animated explainer videocell phone • circular economy • consumer electronicsconsumerismconsumptiondesign intelligencedesign responsibilitydisposable consumptione-waste • energy expenditure • environmental damage • environmental protection • environmentalismgood designgreen designGreenpeace • Greenpeace Schweiz • harmful chemicalsinternational environmental health and sustainability issues • life span • long-lasting productslonger-lasting productsobsolescence • Oeko-Institut • Oko-Institut • patterns of consumptionplanned obsolescenceprecious metals • product cycles cause • rare earths • recycle and repair • recycling rate • renewable resources • service life • short-lived devices • smartphone • smartphone lifetime • smartphone production • sustainabilitysustainable design principles • technical habits • technology sector

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 NOVEMBER 2011

You can have a garden: Edible Island Planters

"Eliza Donald couldn't find a large enough planter that suited her purposes, so decided to make her own. 'It took two years, working with plant specialists, and industrial designers, also asking a lot of people questions. It's important that a design functions well but it's equally important to ask why a person would want to use it in the first place,' she says. Eliza is now director of Edible Islands – handy aesthetically lovely planters the size of a small bathtub. You can plant out your veggies and a small tree, or once all your herbs die (if you have my touch) you can pop a lid on and just sit under your tree. Ingenious.

As Eliza points out, the potential benefits are plentiful, 'Sometimes people don't have an easy access to fresh veg. The planters help with Transition Towns – educating people on how to grow their own food and prevention of depression as people swap seeds, plants and recipes, and grow plants with their grandchildren. They increase flight pathways across cities for birds, bees and butterflies as more Edible Island Planters are put on roof tops, back yards, and schools.' The planters are all made in Pakenham, Australia."

(Lou Pardi, (small)LUST, 02 August 2011)

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TAGS

Australia • backyard • bathtubbetter-functioning productsbusiness women • domestic furniture • ecodesign • Edible Island Planters • Edible Islands • Eliza Donald • entrepreneurshipenvironmentally conscious design • fresh food • gardeninggreen design • grow your own food • herbs • industrial designkiwi ingenuity • Little Veggie Patch Company • Pakenham • planter • plantsproduct designproduct designerprotoductionresearch and developmentrooftopseedself-sufficientsustainable agriculture • sustainable cities • sustainable landscape and garden design • swappingtransition towns • veggies • women designers

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MAY 2011

The Story of Stuff: The Story of Electronics

"So, some time ago I was shown this video 'The Story of Stuff', a project created by Annie Leonard. She is an environmentalist who worked on international environmental health and sustainability issues, among other things like Greenpeace International, Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA) and others.

This project has, so far, 2 seasons, the first with 7 short animated videos explaining some of our everyday environmental, social and economic problems and how they're related to one another. The second season is more focused on what is behind these social, environmental and economical problems and how we can act on them."

(Letícia Neves, 23 March 2011)

Fig.1 Annie Leonard (9 November 2010). 'The Story of Electronics'

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TAGS

2010activismanimated explainer videoanimated presentation • Annie Leonard • commoditycritiquedesign intelligencedesign responsibilitydisposable consumptione-wasteecological • economic issues • electronicselectronics industry • Electronics TakeBack Coalition • environmental issuesenvironmentalistethicseverydayexploitationgadget • GAIA • Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives • green design • green race to the top • Greenpeace • Greenpeace International • high-tech revolution • innovationinternational environmental health and sustainability issueslong-lasting products • manufacturing industry • miningobsolescencePeoples Republic of Chinapoison • poisoned workers • recyclable • recyclingresponsibility • responsible recycling • social changesocial issues • Story of Electronics • Story of Stuff • sustainability • toxic-free products • toxicological effectswaste

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 OCTOBER 2008

Nakagin Capsule Tower

"Kisho Kurokawa can't seem to catch a break these days. Just days after the Japanese architect lost his bid for the governorship of Tokyo, the Nakagin Capsule Tower, his best known building and one of the few built examples of the Metabolist movement, was given a date with the wrecking ball.

The Capsule Tower, completed in 1972, stands in the centre of Tokyo's affluent Ginza neighbourhood. The building is actually composed of two concrete towers, respectively 11 and 13 stories, each encrusted with an outer layer of prefabricated living units. It has long been appreciated by architects as a pure expression of the Metabolist movement, popular in the 1960s and 1970s, which envisioned cities formed of modular components. But in recent years residents expressed growing concern over the presence of asbestos. On April 15, the building's management association approved plans calling for the architectural icon to be razed and replaced with a new 14–story tower. A demolition is yet to be determined.

For his part, Kurokawa has pleaded to let the Capsule Tower express one of its original design qualities: flexibility. He suggested 'unplugging' each box and replacing it with an updated unit, letting the base towers –which he calls 'timeless'–remain untouched. Japan's four major architectural organisations, including the Japan Institute of Architects, support this scheme. But the building's management remained unconvinced and raised concerns regarding the towers' ability to withstand earthquakes, as well as its inefficient use of valuable land. The new building will increase floor area by 60 percent.

Following the board's decision, only Kurokawa continues to raise protest. If the Capsule Tower is destroyed as planned, it will join a growing list of losses. His Sony Tower in Osaka, completed in 1976, came down last year; Plantec Architects designed a glass–walled commercial building that will replace it."
(Yuki Solomon, Architectural Record)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 OCTOBER 2008

Design Futuring: Sustainability, Ethics and New Practice

"Sustainability is now a buzzword both among professionals and scholars. However, though climate change and resource depletion are now widely recognised by business as major challenges, and while new practices like 'green design' have emerged, efforts towards change remain weak and fragmented. Exposing these limitations, 'Design Futuring' systematically presents ideas and methods for Design as an expanded ethical and professional practice. 'Design Futuring' argues that responding to ethical, political, social and ecological concerns now requires a new type of practice which recognizes design's importance in overcoming a world made unsustainable. Illustrated throughout with international case material, 'Design Futuring' presents the author's ground–breaking ideas in a coherent framework, focusing specifically on the ways in which concerns for ethics and sustainability can change the practice of Design for the twenty–first century."

(Tony Fry/Boone Bridge Books, 2008)

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TAGS

Australiaclimate change • design futuring • ecologyethicsgreen designsustainabilityTony Fry

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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