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Which clippings match 'William Burroughs' keyword pg.1 of 2
18 OCTOBER 2016

The Cut Ups (1966) by William S. Burroughs

"The savage deconstruction of the relationship between image and reality. 'Yes, Hello?', 'Look at that picture,' 'Does it seem to be persisting?', 'Good. Thank you'."

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1966 • Antony Balch • avant-garde cinemablack and whiteBrion Gysincut-upcut-up techniquedeconstruction • does it seem to be persisting • experimental filmGood • hello • interrupted • interruptinginterruption • look at that picture • repetition • thank you • The Cut Ups (1966) • William Burroughs • yes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JUNE 2015

What is the Cut-Up Method?

"The writer Ken Hollings examines how an artistic device called the 'cut-up' has been employed by artists and satirists to create new meanings from pre-existing recorded words.

Today's digital age has allowed multi-media satirists like Cassetteboy to mock politicians and TV celebrities online by re-editing - or cutting up - their broadcast words. But the roots of this technique go back to the early days of the avant-garde. The intention has always been to amuse, to surprise, and to question.

The founder of the Dadaist movement, the poet Tristan Tzara, proposed in 1920 that a poem could be created simply by pulling random words cut from a newspaper out of a hat. And it was this idea of the random juxtaposition of text, of creating new meanings from pre-existing material, that so appealed to the painter Brion Gysin in the late 1950s when he and his friend, the American writer William S Burroughs, began applying the technique not just to text but to other media too - including words recorded on tape."

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1920absurdist humourAlan Sugar • Armando Iannucci • artistic device • avant-garde experimental technique • BBC Radio 1 • BBC Radio 4Brion Gysin • broadcast news • Cassetteboy • Chris Morris • Coldcut (duo) • collaged togethercut-upcut-up techniqueDada movement • Dan Shepherd • Doug KahnGeorge W Bush • Julie Andrews • juxtaposition • Ken Hollings • Kevin Foakes (aka DJ Food) • Lenka Clayton • Matt Black • mockingNegativland • Pierre Schaeffer • pulled out of the hat • random juxtaposition • random wordsre-editre-purposeremix cultureRonald Reagan • sound-poetry • State of the Union • tape cut-up • The Apprentice (UK TV series)The Sound of Music (1965)Tristan TzaraVicki BennettWalter RuttmannWilliam Burroughs

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 SEPTEMBER 2010

MTV Buzz: avant-garde television

"Buzz is a long forgotten MTV experiment from 1990. In 1988, Mark Pellington developed an idea for a non–linear collage program he called "Buzz". Created in partnership with MTV Europe producer/director Jon Klein, Buzz was an ambitious 13–part global series commissioned by MTV and channel 4 (UK). It was hailed by critics as ground–breaking, adventurous television. This is episode 1 of the 4 episodes that have managed to survive on an old VHS tape to be digitized for your edification in this modern, digital age."

(Black Flag Party, YouTube Channel)

Fig.1 Buzz Episode 01 Segment 01
Fig.2 Buzz Episode 01 Segment 02
Fig.3 Buzz Episode 01 Segment 03

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19881990 • 90s television • appropriationartistic practiceauthorshipavant-garde • Bruce Conner • Channel 4collageculture jammingcut-up technique • David Byrne • experimentalGenesis P-Orridge • Jon Bon Jovi • Jon Klein • Mark Pellington • MTV • MTV Buzz • MTV Europe • music videopioneering • R. U. Sirius • re-purposerecombinantremix culturesamplingsequence designtelevisiontelevision seriestransgressionUKVHSvisual communicationvisual languagevisual literacyWilliam Burroughs

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 DECEMBER 2006

CRYSTALPUNK: The Chain-Reaction Glitterati

http://socialfiction.org
Crystalpunk is a self–invented movement for self–education making itself real. Crystalpunk is a panoply of ideas revolving around the same few Wandering Stars: the Game of Go and the Game of Life, the origin of language and the origin of mind, the suspected but never–realised capabilities of mind, matter, memory and computers whispered into your inner ear by unknown writers and succumbi, the power of abstraction and a melancholy for the noise lost, the BacterioPoetic and the cybernetic writing machine envisaged by Italo Calvino and William S. Burroughs.

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abstractionalgorithm • BacterioPoetic • Calvinochess • Crystalpunk • cyberneticgamegenerativelanguagelogicludic • stream of consciousness • William Burroughswriting machine
25 NOVEMBER 2006

The Avant-garde Has Had A Variety Of Different Approaches To Narrative

Rob Bridgett
Rather than completely destroying narrative, the avant–garde has had a variety of different approaches, from Godard's gestures of "counter cinema"4 through the feminist perspectives of Constance Penley5 to the various forms of Dada hostility. It is into this reconsideration of narrative that the recent "structural–materialist" films of the ?50s and ?60s fit. They operate in an arena of the "independent" and harbour a concern with the connection of an avant–garde cinema with similar gestures in other areas of the arts. In the case of William Burroughs, the cut–up technique is an extension of a literary concept, and in the case of the New York–based Fluxus group, cinema represents extensions of "concept art." Throughout this history of alternative cinema there is evident this spirit of extension and collaboration, from Surrealism and Dada, which also began as literary endeavours, through to the Fluxus group and the French Situationists who work throughout various mediums in the spirit of "expanded arts.

[4]. Wollen, Peter. "Counter cinema: vent d?est, " Afterimage #4, 1972.
[5]. Penley, Constance. "The Avant–garde and Its Imaginary. " An expanded version of a paper presented during the avant–garde event at the Edinburgh Film Festival, August 1970, from Camera Obscura.

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avant-gardeconcept art • counter cinema • Dada • expanded arts • filmFluxusFluxus groupFrench New WaveindependentJean-Luc GodardnarrativeSituationists • structural-materialist • surrealWilliam Burroughs
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