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07 JULY 2010

There was relatively little divide between spectator and performer in the archaic theatre

"In the archaic theatre there was relatively little divide between spectator and performer, seeing and doing; people danced and spoke, then retired to a stone seat to watch others dance and declaim. By the time of Aristotle, actors and dancers had become a caste with special skills of costuming, speaking, and moving. Audiences stayed offstage, and so developed their own skills of interpretation as spectators. As critics, the audience sought to speculate then about what the stage–characters did not understand about themselves (though the chorus on stage sometimes also took on this clarifying role)."

(Richard Sennett, 2008, p.125)

Fig.1 Lysistrata Summer 2006 University of Florida

2). Sennett, R. (2008). "The Craftsman". New Haven & London, Yale University Press.

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TAGS

2008actor • archaic theatre • Aristotleaudienceauthorshipboundary • chorus • Classicalcostumedance • demarcation • engagementjoinorderingparticipationperformanceperformerRichard Sennettscriptibleseeing and doingshow (spectacle)skillspectatorshipstageThe Craftsmantheatre

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 OCTOBER 2009

Sketch2Photo: Internet Image Montage

"PhotoSketch is an internet–based programme that can take [a] rough, labelled sketch ... and automatically turn it into the naff montage... Seems unbelievable but–as the video shows–it works.

According to authors, their software can take any rough sketch, with the shape of each element labelled with its name, find images corresponding to each drawn element, judge which are a better match to the shapes, and then seamlessly merge it all into one single image."

(Jesus Diaz, 5 Oct 5 2009, Gizmodo)

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TAGS

algorithmcollectcompositingdatadesignICTintegrateInternetjoinmontagePhotoshopsketch • Sketch2Photo • solutiontechnologyvisual depictionvisual literacyvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 OCTOBER 2009

Xanadu: editable, quotable, annotatable; multiple dimensions and views

"2). Everything Must be editable, quotable, annotatable – all the time by everyone. This is not optional. It must, however, be clear what has been modified, and who made the revisions.

3). The same information can be structured–viewed–formatted in various ways. Simultaneously having multiple dimensions and views. Potentially infinite dimensions will allow the same data to be included in vast numbers of sets, lists, and structures. Each user can have many unique personal dimensions linking all the documents they have ever accessed. They will be able to view these dimensions on any Internet connected computer, thus in effect, allowing their complete personal computing environments to follow them to any available screen in the world. By following along their personal time dimension from past through future, it provides a simple chronological organizing structure. You could even have a dimension linking all your favorite dimensions created by others. The real world will be one of the transparent overlays, it will be that other reality. It will be the strongly predominant display in mission critical situations, such as driving and close encounters with loved ones."

(Jack Seay, 6 February 2005)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 NOVEMBER 2008

Knowledge Integration between Experts and Decision Makers

"Amidst the increasing complexity of markets, technologies, or consumer demands, ever more distributed expertise needs to be integrated for effective decision making. Consequently, the integration of knowledge becomes an important function for organizations [Grant 1996: 377]. Knowledge integration is the synthesis of individuals' specialized knowledge into situation–specific, systemic knowledge [Alavi and Tiwana 2002]. The aim of knowledge integration is not to minimize the knowledge gap between individuals, groups, or organizations, but to foster specialization while combining specialized knowledge in joint actions and decisions [Eisenhardt and Santos 2000]. Especially in complex, uncertain, and high–risk decision processes, managers need to draw on the specific knowledge of domain experts. Yet, the use of expertise is bound to cognitive, interactional, social, and political challenges that intervene in the decision making process [Eisenhardt and Zbaracki 1992]. In this paper, we focus on the interactional, i.e. communicative challenges of knowledge integration. By doing so, we aim to advance a communication perspective on knowledge management issues [see also: Mengis and Eppler 2005]. This perspective is based on the idea that we create, share, and integrate knowledge in social interactions [Nonaka and Takeuchi 1995] and that communication is therefore constitutive to knowledge processes. In the context of the expert–decision maker interaction, co–located conversations are the main communicative form through which knowledge is integrated. Conversations allow for high interactivity (participants can pose clarifying questions and ask for the larger context of a specific piece of information). The language and complexity of discourse can be finely aligned to the characteristics of the interlocutors [Krauss and Fussell 1991] and the para– and non–verbal cues facilitate the development of a common ground [Olson and Olson 2000], a prerequisite for mutual understanding.

On the other hand, conversations are ephemeral [Bregman and Haythornthwaite 2001] so that the major reasons and motivations behind the decisions taken are often poorly documented. They are bound to the linear flow of time, which limits comparisons of multiple variables and complex issues. Finally, conversations are often characterized by conversational patterns such as defensive arguing [Argyris 1996], unequal turn–talking [Ellinor and Gerard 1998], or dichotomous arguing [Tannen 1999].

In order to better utilize the potential of conversations for knowledge integration and to overcome the drawbacks and challenges that are bound to this communicational form, conversations can be supported by interactive visualization tools [Eppler 2005]. In this paper, we will hence discuss the role of collaborative visualization for knowledge integration by presenting an experimentally tested model."
(Jeanne Mengis & Martin J. Eppler, University of Lugano, Switzerland)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 NOVEMBER 2008

Youniverse: another social networking application

[Another social networking application. This one uses a visual 'test' to define your personality and potential compatibility.]

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belongingcommunicationcommunitycultural codescultural signalsdesign formalismdiscontinuedDNAICT • Imagini • individualityinformation architectureinformation designinnovationjoinlinkmatchmembershipparticipation • preference • quizsocial interactionsocial softwaretechnology • VisualDNA • Youniverse

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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