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Which clippings match 'Domestic Violence' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 JUNE 2015

Spare Rib magazines available via JISC Journal Archives

"Few titles sum up an era and a movement like Spare Rib. When the first issue came out in July 1972, many women were starting to question their position and role in society. The magazine was an active part of the emerging women's liberation movement. It challenged the stereotyping and exploitation of women in what was the first national magazine of its kind. It supported collective, realistic solutions to the hurdles women faced and reached out to women from all backgrounds. Spare Rib became the debating chamber of feminism in the UK. It continued until January 1993 and the full archive of 239 magazines provides a valuable insight into women's lives and this period of feminist activity."

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TAGS

19721993 • abortion • activism • Alice Walker • archival research • Betty Friedan • British Library • challenging the status quo • digitisation programmedomestic violenceeducational resource • exploitation of women • female sexual experience • feminism • feminist activity • feminist community • feminist issues • feminist magazine • feminist perspective • feminist researchers • feminist strugglesgender equalitygender stereotypes • Germaine Greer • hair care • honest style • intellectual heritage • Jisc Journal Archives • magazine • Margaret Drabble • national magazine • news stories • online archive • ordinary women • position in society • progeny • radical feminism • research archive • role in society • Rosie Boycott • second-wave feminism • self-defence • sexist advertisements • sexuality • Spare Rib (magazine) • status quotheir stories • third-wave feminism • UKwomen • womens liberation movement • womens studies

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 JANUARY 2014

Interactive billboards that drop angels on your head

"There you are in the middle of the city, traffic all around, planes buzzing above and you notice a little boy on a giant screen pointing up. 'Look,' says the boy. And you look, and the on–screen boy is pointing at an actual plane flying in the sky. He knows its flight number, its destination. This is no joke. That is flight BA475 from Barcelona! He tracks its path with his little hand, and then, when the plane is gone, he dashes off. This is a British Airways display ad in London's Piccadilly Circus, and it's using to identify actual planes in the actual sky.

Digital billboards are stepping up their game. They are becoming . There's another stunning example at Euston Station (also in London) that shows a man furiously screaming at a woman who is clearly frightened. But you can help. If you have a cellphone, you can yank the man clear across the station, dragging him from screen to screen to screen until he's way on the other side of the terminal.

I've got one more. This time it's a fantasy experience available to anyone who steps into a marked spot in the middle of Victoria Station. (London's a happening place for billboard experimentation.) Once you're there, a holographic angel drops down from heaven and lands beside you. You can't see her in real space, but you and she are plainly visible on a screen that everybody in the station can see, and you are free to interact anyway you please."

(Robert Krulwich, 04 January 2014, NPR)

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TAGS

2014advertising in public spacesaeroplaneangelawareness raisingbillboardboy • British Airways • cellphonecreative advertising • cute girl • digital billboardsdigital displaysdigital screens • display ad • domestic violence • e-motion screens • Euston Station • experience design • fantasy experience • flight number • flying • frighten • furious • get involvedholograph • interactive billboard • interactive digital displayinteractive displayinteractive installationinteractive screen • intervene • JCDecaux • London Victoria • Lynx Excite • manmobile phone • National Centre for Domestic Violence (NCDV) • NPROgilvy Group UK • Piccadilly Circus • pointing • public spacescream • screen to screen • sky • surveillance technology • train station • Victoria Station • visual communicationwoman

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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