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26 MAY 2014

Hootsuite: Social Media Management Dashboard

"Manage social networks, schedule messages, engage your audiences, and measure ROI right from the dashboard."

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2008 • analytic reporting • analyticsbrand management • business strategy • campaign momentum • content management dashboard • dashboarddata gathering instrumentsFacebookFoursquareGoogle Plus • Hootsuite Media Inc • Instagram • integration platform • integration softwareLinkedIn • MailChimp • managing brands • marketing processes • measure performancemeasurement of impactmetrics tools • Mixi • MySpaceonline marketingpromotion and disseminationReddit • regulatory compliance • return on investment (ROI) • ROI • Ryan Holmes • social implementation • social media • social media activity • social media analytics • social media analytics reports • social media channels • social media dashboard • social media efforts • social media management • social media management system • social media marketing • social media monitoring tool • social media platform • social media presence • social network integrations • social networks • social reach • software integration • software utility • Storify • TrendSpottr • TumblrTwitter • utility software • VimeoWordPressYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 FEBRUARY 2014

An Introduction to the Federated Social Network

"To understand how federated social networking would be an improvement, we should understand how online social networking essentially works today. Right now, when you sign up for Facebook, you get a Facebook profile, which is a collection of data about you that lives on Facebook's servers. You can add words and pictures to your Facebook profile, and your Facebook profile can have a variety of relationships – it can be friends with other Facebook profiles, it can be a 'fan' of another Facebook page, or 'like' a web page containing a Facebook widget. Crucially, if you want to interact meaningfully with anyone else's Facebook profile or any application offered on the Facebook platform, you have to sign up with Facebook and conduct your online social networking on Facebook's servers, and according to Facebook's rules and preferences. (You can replace 'Facebook' with 'Orkut,' 'LinkedIn,' 'Twitter,' and essentially tell the same story.)

We've all watched the dark side of this arrangement unfold, building a sad catalog of the consequences of turning over data to a social networking company. The social networking company might cause you to overshare information that you don't want shared, or might disclose your information to advertisers or the government, harming your privacy. And conversely, the company may force you to undershare by deleting your profile, or censoring information that you want to see make it out into the world, ultimately curbing your freedom of expression online. And because the company may do this, governments might attempt to require them to do it, sometimes even without asking or informing the end–user.

How will federated social networks be different? The differences begin with the code behind online social networking. The computer code that gives you a Facebook profile is built in a closed way – it's proprietary and kept relatively secret by Facebook, so you have to go through Facebook to create, maintain, and interact with Facebook profiles or applications.

But federated social network developers are doing two things differently in order to build a new ecosystem. First, the leading federated social networking software is open–source: that means that anybody can download the source code, and use it to create and maintain social networking profiles for themselves and others. Second, the developers are simultaneously collaborating on a new common language, presumably seeking an environment where most or even all federated social networking profiles can talk to one another.

What will that likely mean in practice? To join a federated social network, you'll be able to choose from an array of 'profile providers,' just like you can choose an email provider. You will even be able to set up your own server and provide your social networking profile yourself. And in a federated social network, any profile can talk to another profile – even if it's on a different server.

Imagine the Web as an open sea. To use Facebook, you have to immigrate to Facebook Island and get a Facebook House, in a land with a single ruler. But the distributed social networks being developed now will allow you to choose from many islands, connected to one another by bridges, and you can even have the option of building your own island and your own bridges."

(Richard Esguerra, 21 March 21 2011, Electronic Frontier Foundation)

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2011abstraction layeragency of access and engagementautonomy • centralised infrastructure • centralised platformcommon interfaceComputer Supported Cooperative Work • content distribution networks • data contextdecentralisation • decentralised architecture • decentralised infrastructure • distributed ecosystemdistributed models • distributed social network • Distributed Social Networking (DOSN) • distributed social networks • distributed systemElectronic Frontier Foundation • Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP) • Facebook • Federated Social Networks (FSN) • Google Wave Federation Protocol • hCard • information ecosysteminteroperabilityknowledge commonsLinkedInlocalisationmultiplatform • OAuth • Online Social Networks (OSN) • open architecture • open protocol • Open Stack • open standardsOpenID • OpenSocial • Orkut • OStatus • peer-to-peer exchange • Portable Contacts (open protocol) • social network aggregation services • software portability • structural abstraction • system scalability • technology integrationTwitter • user application data • user autonomy • Wave Federation Protocol • web feeds • web services • XFN • XRD

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MARCH 2013

Mobile Apps: the trouble with using 'Responsive Design'

"Amid an overwhelming amount of mobile options and solutions, it's easy to see why responsive design's singular code seems like an alluring universal panacea for mobile optimization. However, while responsive design aims to scale web content fluidly across multiple devices with different screen sizes, it may not represent the best option for organizations aiming to deliver unique and innovative experiences to customers. ...

The future of digital business depends primarily on mastering the mobile channel. Mobile's mushrooming numbers are due to the convenience of remote access and a new reliance upon the delivery of information when and where little to none was previously available. When developing your approach to engaging customers via mobile, it is key to ensure your strategy accounts for the rising expectations your customers have for this important channel.

Once you understand the kind of mobile experience you want to create, you can decide whether adopting a responsive design philosophy can deliver upon these expectations and goals. While responsive design can help you achieve a certain measure of consistency across channels, the real prize lies with the ability to create unique experiences. A broader multi–screen approach designed dynamically by channel will enable the sort of customer experiences that yield higher engagement and contribute to overall success."

(Carin van Vuuren, 18 November 2012, Forbes)

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appconveniencecustomer experiencedesign principles • device-specific content display • differencedigital business • engaging customers via mobile • Forbes • Forrester • information delivery • interactive experienceLinkedInmagazinesmobile apps • mobile channel • mobile development • mobile experience • mobile optimisation • mobile site • mobile solutions • mobile strategy • multi-screenmultiple devicesnewspapers • one-web • People magazine • remote access • responsive design • responsive site • responsive web design • scale web content • screen size and orientation • screen sizes • singular code • smartphonetechnology solutionuse case • varying screen sizes • web development • web experience

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 DECEMBER 2012

Expat Experiences of New Zealand Employers Hiring

"During November 2012 there were over 120 comments posted largely by expat and returned Kiwis in a KEA group LinkedIn discussion on 'How do employers view those coming home after an extended period of time?' The comments centred around a theme that NZ employers appear fearful of hiring expats and don't recognise the skills and global connectivity opportunities which they can bring.

Reading through the comments one can identify many factors which matched those contained in material released on my website two years ago looking at the cultural impediments to growth of the New Zealand economy. So taking on board the strongly expressed hopes by many contributors that something would be done to highlight this issue of expat under–utilisation I have prepared this paper which will be referenced in the BNZ Weekly Overview ... The material will also form a backgrounder to comments to be included in my talks around New Zealand during 2013."

(Tony Alexander, BNZ Chief Economist, 30 November 2012)

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2012Aotearoa New Zealand • backgrounder • BNZ • BNZ Weekly Overview • colonial mentality • coming home • cultural cringe • cultural impediments • economic growthemployersemployment opportunities • expat • Global Career Link • global citizensglobal connectivityglobal opportunitieshiring • illusory superiority • impediments to growth • inferiority complex • Kea New ZealandKiwiKiwi expatLinkedInnational economyonline discussion • overqualified • perceived superiority • returning home • Tony Alexander • under-utilisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 MARCH 2012

Retaggr: sharing your portable online profile across social networks

"retaggr [was before it closed] a widget–based service that enables active web users to link all their various site–based profiles into a single, always updated, interactive business card that can be attached to virtually any type of content or interaction the user has on the web.

The interactive profile card can be linked to or embedded anywhere online, including in email signatures, blog entries, other text, or as part of online profiles on sites like LinkedIn, Facebook, twitter, and others. It lets you leave a summary of the way you define yourself on the web anywhere you want to share it."

(Retaggr, CrunchBase Profile)

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aggregate • attached to content • business card • content aggregation • defunct • digital business card • discontinued • email signature • embeddingFacebook • interactive profile card • linkedLinkedIn • making a personal connection • online • online business card • online content • online profile • online profiles • others to see • personapersonal identitypersonal information • personal profile tool • personal website • personality • portable snapshot • profile tool • promoted to others • public profile • Retaggr • self • single business card • site-based profile • social networkingsocial networksTwitter • virtual business card • Web 2.0web presencewidget • widget-based service • yourself

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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