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16 MAY 2014

Digital Health: emerging healthcare practices through digital convergence

"Digital health is the convergence of the digital and genetics revolutions with health and healthcare. As we are seeing and experiencing, digital health is empowering us to better track, manage, and improve our own and our family's health. It's also helping to reduce inefficiencies in healthcare delivery, improve access, reduce costs, increase quality, and make medicine more personalized and precise. ...

The essential elements of the digital health revolution include wireless devices, hardware sensors and software sensing technologies, microprocessors and integrated circuits, the Internet, social networking, mobile and body area networks, health information technology, genomics, and personal genetic information.

The lexicon of Digital Health is extensive and includes all or elements of mHealth (aka Mobile Health), Wireless Health, Health 2.0, eHealth, Health IT, Big Data, Health Data, Cloud Computing, e–Patients, Quantified Self and Self–tracking, Wearable Computing, Gamification, Telehealth & Telemedicine, Precision and Personalized Medicine, plus Connected Health."

(Paul Sonnier, Story of Digital Health)

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big data • Body Area Network (BAN) • cloud computing • connected devices • connected health • digital convergence • digital genetics • digital healthdigital health solution • e-Patients • eHealth • emerging healthcare practices • emerging practices • ePatients • gamificationgamifyinggeneticsgenomics • hardware sensors • health 2.0 • health data • health IT • healthcare delivery • mHealthmobile health • nuviun • patient information • personal genetic information • Personal Health Information (PHI) • personalised healthcare • personalised medicine • precision medicine • quantified self • self-monitoring • self-tracking • social networking • software sensing technologies • superconvergence • technology convergence • telehealth • telemedicine • wearable computingwellbeing • wireless health

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MARCH 2014

Gardner Campbell: A Personal Cyberinfrastructure

"So, how might colleges and universities shape curricula to support and inspire the imaginations that students need? Here's one idea. Suppose that when students matriculate, they are assigned their own web servers – not 1GB folders in the institution's web space but honest–to–goodness virtualized web servers of the kind available for $7.99 a month from a variety of hosting services, with built–in affordances ranging from database maintenance to web analytics. As part of the first–year orientation, each student would pick a domain name. Over the course of the first year, in a set of lab seminars facilitated by instructional technologists, librarians, and faculty advisors from across the curriculum, students would build out their digital presences in an environment made of the medium of the web itself. They would experiment with server management tools via graphical user interfaces such as cPanel or other commodity equivalents. They would install scripts with one–click installers such as SimpleScripts. They would play with wikis and blogs; they would tinker and begin to assemble a platform to support their publishing, their archiving, their importing and exporting, their internal and external information connections. They would become, in myriad small but important ways, system administrators for their own digital lives.[3] In short, students would build a personal cyberinfrastructure, one they would continue to modify and extend throughout their college career – and beyond.

In building that personal cyberinfrastructure, students not only would acquire crucial technical skills for their digital lives but also would engage in work that provides richly teachable moments ranging from multimodal writing to information science, knowledge management, bibliographic instruction, and social networking. Fascinating and important innovations would emerge as students are able to shape their own cognition, learning, expression, and reflection in a digital age, in a digital medium. Students would frame, curate, share, and direct their own "engagement streams" throughout the learning environment.[4] Like Doug Engelbart's bootstrappers in the Augmentation Research Center, these students would study the design and function of their digital environments, share their findings, and develop the tools for even richer and more effective metacognition, all within a medium that provides the most flexible and extensible environment for creativity and expression that human beings have ever built."

(Gardner Campbell, 4 September 2009)

Gardner Campbell, "A Personal Cyberinfrastructure," EDUCAUSE Review, vol. 44, no. 5 (September/October 2009), pp. 58–59.

[3] Jim Groom has outlined several key parts of this vision: "A Domain of One's Own," bavatuesdays, November 29, 2008, .

[4] W. Gardner Campbell and Robert F. German Jr., "The Map Is the Territory: Course 'Engagement Streams' as Catalysts for Deep Learning," EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) Annual Meeting, January 21, 2009, podcast at "

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2009A Domain of Ones Own (project) • a personal cyber infrastructure • agency of access and engagement • assemble a platform • Augmentation Research Center at SRI • bootstrapper • connectivism • cPanel • cyberinfrastructure • Dave Winerdigital environmentsdigital livesdigital medium • digital presence • Douglas Engelbarte-learning 2.0education innovationEducause Quarterlyengagement streams • external information connections • flexible and extensible environment • Gardner Campbell • information connections • information science • infrastructureinstitutional network • internal information connections • Jim Groomknowledge managementlearning technology • matriculate • metacognitionmultimodal scholarship • multimodal writing • personal cyber infrastructurepersonal expressionPersonal Learning Environment • richly teachable moments • Robert German • server management • shape your own cognition • share your findings • SimpleScripts • skillful practice • skills acquisition • social networkingtechnology affordancesthinking toolstinkertinkerer • Virginia Tech • web server • web server space • web space

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 JANUARY 2014

Tinder: swiping yes to intimate invitations from relative strangers

"Tinder uses your existing social networking data from Facebook to locate people in the immediate vicinity, tell you a bit about them, whether you have any friends in common and (most importantly) show you a pic.

It has slimmed down the emotional, cognitive and financial investment required by the virtual dating process to one simple question: 'Do I want to do you?' What more modern way to make that most basic binary decision of whether you want to shag someone than a game of real–world 'Hot or Not'?

Social media has made us expert first–daters, well–versed in smalltalk and over–sharing with strangers. The quick follow–though from swipe to sex is similarly instinctive for a generation with an appetite for immediacy."

(Caroline Kent, 19 Sep 2013)

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automatic predictions • binary decision • casual sexcommodifying myselfcomparison site • compass • cross-context sharingdatadata matchingdatingFacebook • friends in common • hot or not • identity performance • immediate vicinity • iPhonelikedlikeslocation-basedlocation-based social networkingmobile appnormalising over-sharingonline datingonline profilesoversharingpersonal brandingproximityrecommendation platformself-disclosure • shag • shared friends • small talksocial mediasocial networkingspectacular societyswipingTinder (app)user data • vicinity • virtual dating

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 OCTOBER 2013

The use of social media has the potential for good or harm

"Over the past months we've seen other destructive aspects of the 'net. From death threats tweeted to female MPs and journalists, to the tragic suicides of cyber–bullied teens. Growing concern about the web is understandable and reviews into safeguarding must continue.

Yet alongside healthy caution it's crucial that the technology itself does not become the focus of the blame. Technology is a tool and we get to choose how we use it. When we blame the tool we take the moral onus off ourselves, the user.

From the ability to control fire, to the invention of the wheel or the printing press, each has the potential for great good, or great harm. No tool is completely neutral of course – but we shape them far more than they shape us. That perspective is crucial & empowering."

(Vicky Beeching, 24 October 2013, BBC Radio 4: Thought for the Day)

TAGS

ad press • BBC Radio 4 • blaming tools • cultural technologycyberbullyingdestructive potentialdigital technology • disturbing elements • ethical considerationsFacebookgraphic violence • healthy caution • internet age • internet revolution • invention of the wheel • moral complexities • potential for good • potential for harmprinting presssafeguardingscrutinysocial changesocial mediasocial networking • technical instrumentalism • technological instrumentalismtechnology as neutral • technology industry • technology is a tooltechnology neutralityteen suicideThought for the Day • Vicky Beeching

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 DECEMBER 2012

New Myspace: better all-in-one for social music playing and discovery

"Facebook may have won the social networking war, but Myspace is moving to a different battlefield under its new owner Specific Media, which acquired the site from News Corporation in June 2011.

After a period spent rebuilding Myspace from the ground up, the company published a teaser video on Vimeo in September – unveiled via tweet by co–investor Justin Timberlake – showing off a radically different design and an emphasis on music. ...

'The promise of discovery and sharing new, good music was never really fulfilled by other services out there,' says Tim. 'It's an unfulfilled promise that nobody ever really executed on.'

The new Myspace continues to compete with Facebook in some respects: artists create profiles on the site and post updates and content for their fans to watch, listen and share. But actually, its real competition is streaming music services like Spotify and Deezer."

(Stuart Dredge, 16 November 2012, The Guardian)

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2011all in one placeall-in-oneanalytics • artist profiles • beta testing • Chris Vanderhook • comeback • Deezer • discovery and sharing • FacebookJustin Timberlake • licence fees • listening to musicmusic • music artists • music discovery • music industryMySpace • new music • new Myspace • News Corporation • playing music • rebuilding • sharing music • signed artists • social features • social networksocial networking • social networking features • Specific Media LLC • Spotifystartups • streaming music • streaming music service • ticket purchasing • unsigned artists • visual clutter • watch listen and share

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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