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Which clippings match 'Prediction' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 JANUARY 2014

An introduction to recommender systems

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TAGS

advogato.org • affinity analysisalgorithmic filtersAmazon.comautomatic predictions • collaborative filtering • collaborative filtering approach • correlationsdata matchingdata miningecho chamberfavourite things • FilmTrust • information filtering • information filtering system • information patterns • interests • Jennifer Golbeck • large datasetsLast.fm • moleskiing.it • Pandora Radiopersonal tastepersonalised suggestionsprediction • process of filtering • rating systemrecommendationrecommendation enginerecommendation platform • recommendation system • recommendation systems • recommender systems • relatednessrelationships between individualsserendipitysimilaritysimilarity machinesimilitude • trust metric • trust-based recommender systems • user datauser preferences

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 JULY 2013

Futuristic fashions: Eve, A.D. 2000!

"Futuristic fashions 1939 style include a dress that can be adapted for day or evening wear, complete with sun–visor (and African–American maid), and a dress made of transparent net with a towering 60s–style hairdo (wouldn't look out of place on a millennium catwalk). The next two outfits are pretty transparent too; then a bridal gown with a cellophane veil and another adaptable dress.

The suit for the man of 2000 looks like a boiler suit with wide chain mail over the top. A circular aerial is worn on the head, to pick up signals for his mobile phone and radio. He also has two natty silver boxes attached to his belt 'for coins, keys and candy for cuties'. The beard is marcel–waved and he has buns of hair at the side of his head. Not a particularly manly look!"

(British Pathé)

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TAGS

1930s19392000 • 2000 AD • adaptable dress • aerial • African-American • beard • boiler suit • bridal gownBritish Pathe • candy for cuties • catwalkcellophane • chain mail • clothing • day wear • dress • Eve • evening wear • fashion designfashion forecastingfuture forecastingfuturistic design • futuristic fashions • futuristic visionhair • hairdo • maid • manly look • millenniummobile phone • natty • newsreel • outfit • Pathetone Weekly • portable radio • predictionretrofuturismstylesuit • sun visor • transparencyveilwomens clothingwomenswear

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MAY 2011

Monkey Magazine: a new publishing vernacular?

"In the future, as depicted in the 2002 film Minority Report, our periodicals will create interactive, hybrid reading/viewing experiences–with built–in sound and motion–based commercials rather than static advertisements, incorporating news footage with pages that dissolve and re–form to reflect breaking stories. Despite minute gestures in that direction, such as the Amazon Kindle and G24, The Guardian's PDF newspaper that's updated throughout the day, that vision of media–if there's really a market for it–is a long way off. ...

Nevertheless, something ... is now available weekly from Dennis Publishing, the company that gave the world The Week, Maxim and several other British 'lad magazines' as well as launched their American spin–offs. Monkey is proportioned like a glossy, has an interface that mimics the turning of pages and even has a magazine–like layout: margins, a basic two–column grid, images combined with text and print–like pacing. The difference is that Monkey's text sparkles (literally, if not figuratively), dances and slides onto the page. Many of the photos will turn into movies or slideshows (some rather naughty) when clicked, and on some spreads users can shuffle page elements, substituting one image for another. The format also changes to serve its content. A small mini–magazine with short reviews is digitally 'stitched' into the 'middle' of each issue. Additionally, most advertisements come alive, thanks either to Flash, streaming video or some combination, showing previews of movies or commercials for products framed by the equivalent of a full–page ad.

To be sure, Monkey does nothing that isn't done on other websites, and it has formal predecessors for its page interface–the arty This Is a Magazine, for one, and the webified versions of print glossies from Zinio for another. But unlike the wider web–which has evolved its own vocabulary and conventions for storytelling–and other web magazine predecessors–for which the turn–the–page interface seems a formal conceit–Monkey truly blends old and new media design conventions in a way that is both appalling and appealing."

(Jandos Rothstein, 29 January 2008)

Fig.1 Monkey Magazine, 2011. Dennis Publishing, Issue 183, pp.8,9.

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TAGS

Adobe FlashAIGAAmazon Kindleanimated presentationcelebritycontent formconventions • Dennis Publishing • design aestheticsdesign conventionsdesign for the screendesign vocabulary • digitally stitched • e-zine • ezine • formal conceit • G24 • hybridhybrid experiencehybrid forms • lads mag • magazinemagazine layout • Maxim (magazine) • mens magazine • mini-magazine • Minority Report • Monkey Magazine • motion-based commercials • multimedianaughtynew medianews footagenewspaper • page interface • page metaphorpaginationpastiche • PDF newspaper • pin-upprediction • print glossies • print-like • publishingreading experience • screen dissolve • sexslide showstorytellingstreaming videoThe Guardian • The Week (magazine) • This Is a Magazine • triviaturn-the-page interfaceuser experience design (UX)vernacularviewing experiencevisual communicationvisual languagevisual vernacularweb designweb magazineweb vernacularwebified • webzine • Zinio (magazine)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JULY 2009

Shopping in 1999 A.D.

"From the film 1967 1999 A.D., a short sponsored by the Philco–Ford Corporation, showing what home shopping would be like three decades in the future. Although they missed the frenetic pace of today's online shopping experience–the housewife's browsing looks almost leisurely–they guessed correctly on the abundance flat–panel screens (with multiple monitors, no less), even if they were off by about a decade. Oh course, they didn't quite put together that we'd still be using keyboards for input."

(Joel Johnson, 10 September 2007, Boing Boing Gadgets)

[While this forecast is clearly about the potential of information and communication technology it also quite dramatically demonstrates the interdependence of technological development and culture e.g. reinforcing 1960's gender stereotypes.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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