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Which clippings match 'Design Prototype' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 OCTOBER 2015

Connbox: prototyping a physical product for video presence with Google Creative Lab, 2011

"At the beginning of 2011 we started a wide-ranging conversation with Google Creative Lab, discussing near-future experiences of Google and its products. They had already in mind another brief before approaching us, to create a physical product encapsulating Google voice/video chat services. This brief became known as 'Connection Box' or 'Connbox' for short…

There were interaction & product design challenges in making a simpler, self-contained video chat appliance, amplified by the problem of taking the things we take for granted on the desktop or touchscreen: things like the standard UI, windowing, inputs and outputs, that all had to be re-imagined as physical controls.

This is not a simple translation between a software and hardware behaviour, it’s more than just turning software controls into physical switches or levers.

It involves choosing what to discard, what to keep and what to emphasise.

Should the product allow ‘ringing’ or ‘knocking’ to kickstart a conversation, or should it rely on other audio or visual cues? How do we encourage always-on, ambient, background presence with the possibility of spontaneous conversations and ad-hoc, playful exchanges? Existing ‘video calling’ UI is not set up to encourage this, so what is the new model of the interaction?

To do this we explored in abstract some of the product behaviours around communicating through video and audio. "

(Matt Jones, 26 February 2013, Berg Ltd)

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TAGS

2011 • Apple FaceTime • Berg Ltd • communications interaction interface • computer-mediated interaction • connbox • design prototypedesigning for interaction • development log • Durrell Bishop • experiential proof • form and functionfuture interfacesGolan Levin • Google Creative Lab • Google Hangouts • Google Plus • hardware prototyping • interaction designinteraction styleslive video • Luckybite • material exploration • near-future scenariosOpenFrameworks • physical product • portalproduct design • prototyping brief • research and developmentSkypesoftware prototypingtechnology affordances • teleconference • video calling • video chat • video conferencing • video phone • video presence • video-based communication • videoconferencing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 DECEMBER 2014

ActiWait: gamifying a pedestrian crossing with interactive pong game

ActiWait "makes waiting at the crosswalk for the signal to change more fun. The game is played while the light is red for the waiting pedestrians: a touch screen is mounted on two signal posts opposite one another. It is operated with your finger. Modeled after 'Pong', the computer game that has long since become a classic, there are two bars on the display, with which–moved with your finger –a ball can be batted back and forth. You get a point for every time your opponent misses the ball. In other words, this is a classic game with a new look and, perhaps most surprising, in a very different environment. Another charming part of the game: the opponents meet completely spontaneously and randomly, without knowing each other.

The idea for the project was first visualized in 2012 in a short video clip, in which the situation was simulated to look very life–like. In actual fact, the video presentation was a perfectly crafted synthesis of animation and real images. The simulation was developed on the computer and projected onto the traffic–signal buttons filmed with a green screen."

(HAWK Press Office)

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2012 • ActiWait • Christiane Dienel • computer gamecrosswalkdesign prototypedesign student projectdesigning experiencesgamificationGermany • HAWK Hildesheim • HAWK Hochschule fur angewandte Wissenschaft und Kunst • Hildesheim • Holger Michel • Ingo Meyer • interaction designMasters studentspedestrian crossingplayPongproduct designpublic spacepublic space use • Stefan Woelwer • StreetPong (prototype) • traffic intersectiontraffic light • traffic light button • traffic signal • University of Applied Sciences and Arts • urban infrastructure • urban interaction • user experience design (UX)user interactions • wireless connection

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 NOVEMBER 2014

Masters graduate prototypes medical emergency ambulance drone

"For the Ambulance Drone, a new type of frame was developed that is a compact flying toolbox containing essential supplies for (lay–person) advanced life support. Portability and foldability help the drone to be used anywhere, also indoors. The first prototype focuses on the delivery of an Automated Defibrillator (AED). ...

The Ambulance Drone is the result of my Master Graduation thesis research project. It aims to save lives through the delivery of emergency supplies within the first minute after an accident. On the 28th of October [2014] I will be presenting this project and graduate from the TU Delft, after which I will look for funding to continue development of this project."

(Alec Momont, 2014)

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2014 • Alec Momont • ambulance drone • applied research • Automated External Defibrillator (AED) • cardiac arrest • compact flying toolbox • defibrillator • DelftDelft University of Technologydesign prototypedesign student projectdrone • drones for good • emergency calls • emergency services • engineering graduate • essential supplies for • flying defibrillator • heart attack victim • helicopter • Jurgen de Jaeger • Kees Nauta • lay-person • life support • life-saving • livestream webcam • Masters students • medical emergency • Netherlands • on-board camera • paramedic • patient • Peter de Jonghe • product designquadcopterresearch project • Richard Goossens • student projects • thesis research project • TU Delft • Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 DECEMBER 2013

Four-winged robot flies like a jellyfish

"Tiny flying robots usually mimic nature's flyers, like birds and insects–but perhaps that's due to a lack of imagination. A four–winged design created by Leif Ristroph and colleagues at New York University, which boasts a body plan reminiscent of a jellyfish, is more stable in the air than insect–like machines.

The prototype consists of a carbon–fibre frame surrounded by two pairs of thin plastic wings that open and close when driven by a motor. Its shape allows it to fly upright with little effort, without requiring sensors or intelligence to adjust its wings like those used by insects. 'Making a dumb machine is a nice strategy for very small robots,' says Ristroph. 'Without circuits and sensors, it's also lighter.'"

(Sandrine Ceurstemont, 25 November 2013, New Scientist)

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TAGS

2013 • American Physical Society • carbon-fibre frame • carried on the breeze • centimetre-scale • creaturedesign prototypedriftdrone • dumb machines • flappingfloatingflying • flying jellyfish • flying machine • flying robot • fruit flyhelicopter • insect-like machine • jellyfish • Leif Ristroph • New Scientist • New York University • plastic wings • robot • robot drone • robotic creature • self-stabilizing • small robot • tiny • wing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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