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Which clippings match 'Independence' keyword pg.1 of 1
26 JUNE 2011

Uncontacted tribe found deep in Amazon rainforest

"Brazilian authorities say they have pinpointed the location of a community of ancient and uncontacted tribespeople in one of the remotest corners of the Amazon rainforest.

Fabricio Amorim, a regional co–ordinator for Brazil's indigenous foundation, Funai, said the indigenous community had been found after three small forest clearings were detected on satellite images. Flyovers were carried out in April, confirming the community's existence.

Four straw–roofed huts, flanked by banana trees and encircled by thick jungle, can be seen in photographs taken during the flyover.

The community is likely to be home to about 200 people, probably from the Pano linguistic group which straddles the border between Brazil, Peru and Bolivia, according to Funai.

Amorim said the region – known as the Vale do Javari – contained 'the greatest concentration of isolated groups in the Amazon and the world' but warned of growing threats to their survival."

(Tom Phillips, 22 June 2011, The Guardian, UK)

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TAGS

2011aerial viewAmazon rainforestancient people • banana trees • BoliviaBrazil • clearings • communityethicsexistence • Fabricio Amorim • flyover • forest clearings • forest-dwelling peoples • FUNAI • independenceIndigenousindigenous community • indigenous foundation • Indigenous peopleindigenous peoples • isolated groups • isolation • jungle • National Indian Foundation • natives • Pano linguistic group • Peruphotographspreservationprotectionrainforestremote communitiessatellite imagessatellite picturesSouth America • straw-roofed huts • sustainable future • threats to their survival • tribal communities • uncontacted community • uncontacted tribespeople • Vale do Javari

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 OCTOBER 2010

Culture as variable systems of meanings

"In this sense, culture can be understood as 'variable systems of meanings,' which are 'learned and largely shared by an identifiable segment of people' (Rohner, 1984, pp119–120). Because these systems of meanings are not universal but culturally bound, people in different cultures sometimes interpret situations in different ways and hold divergent views and concepts."

(Toshie Imada, 2008, Deep Blue at the University of Michigan)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 APRIL 2010

Flagging interest in Nation Branding and National Identity?

"We are a changing, emerging state that no longer seeks inspiration from the present flag. It is part of our history and the role that it has played can be respected. We are moving from a predominantly bicultural society to one that now involves an important component of Pacific island people and also immigrants from Asia.

We must now seek inspiration, visual excitement and stimulus to creativity and excellence from many directions and develop a flag that can be a source of pride to New Zealanders as we continue to impact strongly on the wider world in the many areas of commerce, sport, films, literature, tourism and creative thinking in which we have to strive to excel."

(Ian Prior, 27 February 2004)

Fig.1 New Zealand National flag and state ensign; Fig.2 Michael Smythe, 'Koru (after Gordon Walters)'; Fig.3 Cameron Sanders; Fig.4 'Tino Rangatiratanga'; Fig.5 Kyle Lockwood.

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TAGS

2004Aotearoa New ZealandAsia-Pacificautonomy • biculturalism • brand development • brand recognitionBritish Empirechange of imageCommonwealthconstitution • creation of a brand • defaced Blue Ensign • distinguishing featuresflag • Gordon Walters • historyidentityindependenceIndigenous • koru • Koru Flag • Maori • Michael Smythe • motifnation brandingnational identity • NZFlag.com Trust • PacificPakehaplace brandingpostcolonial • Southern Cross • sovereigntysymbol • Tino Rangatiratanga • vexillologyvisual identity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 SEPTEMBER 2008

The life of an artist is inspired, self sufficient and independent (unrelated to society)...

(Agnes Martin Writings 1991)

[A rather romantic and traditional view of the artist.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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