Not Signed-In
Which clippings match '1975' keyword pg.1 of 2
12 APRIL 2012

Irony and Utopia: a history of computer art

Fig.1 Jean Tinguely 1960). Homage to New York.

1

TAGS

19651975amateurismauthorship • Beau Sievers • chrome age • commercial computer graphics • computer and video games • computer art practicecomputer artistscomputer gamescomputer graphicscomputer musicconvergenceCybernetic Serendipitydigital cultureE.A.T.eco arthistoryHomage to New YorkJean Tinguelymedia artnet.artnew media • scientific computer graphics • skeptical perspective • sub-amateur • utopian perspectivevideo gamesvirtual realityvisualisation • weak gestures

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JANUARY 2012

Technological change: The last Kodak moment?

"LENIN is said to have sneered that a capitalist will sell you the rope to hang him. The quote may be spurious, but it contains a grain of truth. Capitalists quite often invent the technology that destroys their own business.

Eastman Kodak is a picture-perfect example. It built one of the first digital cameras in 1975. That technology, followed by the development of smartphones that double as cameras, has battered Kodak's old film- and camera-making business almost to death. ...

While Kodak suffers, its long-time rival Fujifilm is doing rather well. The two firms have much in common. Both enjoyed lucrative near-monopolies of their home markets: Kodak selling film in America, Fujifilm in Japan. A good deal of the trade friction during the 1990s between America and Japan sprang from Kodak's desire to keep cheap Japanese film off its patch.

Both firms saw their traditional business rendered obsolete. But whereas Kodak has so far failed to adapt adequately, Fujifilm has transformed itself into a solidly profitable business, with a market capitalisation, even after a rough year, of some $12.6 billion to Kodak's $220m. Why did these two firms fare so differently?

Both saw change coming. Larry Matteson, a former Kodak executive who now teaches at the University of Rochester's Simon School of Business, recalls writing a report in 1979 detailing, fairly accurately, how different parts of the market would switch from film to digital, starting with government reconnaissance, then professional photography and finally the mass market, all by 2010. He was only a few years out.

Fujifilm, too, saw omens of digital doom as early as the 1980s. It developed a three-pronged strategy: to squeeze as much money out of the film business as possible, to prepare for the switch to digital and to develop new business lines.

Both firms realised that digital photography itself would not be very profitable. 'Wise businesspeople concluded that it was best not to hurry to switch from making 70 cents on the dollar on film to maybe five cents at most in digital,' says Mr Matteson. But both firms had to adapt; Kodak was slower."

(The Economist, 14 January 2012)

Fig.1 John Terret (03 Nov 2011). "Kodak misses the moment", Al Jazeera.

Fig.2 Kodak (1922). "Kodachrome Film Test".

1
2

TAGS

19221975cameracamera-making businesscapitalismcolour • complacency • convergence • death knell • demise • digital cameradisruptive innovationEastman Kodak • film test • FujifilmJapanKodachrome • Kodachrome Film Test • KodakKodak Eastman • Kodak moment • market dominanceobsolescenceold media • picture-perfect • product designradical innovationsmartphonetechnological changetechnological innovationtechnologytechnology innovationVladimir Lenin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JULY 2011

One Hit Wonders: singers and groups who made a single hit song and were never heard from again

"The history of popular music is haunted by the ghosts of scores of singers and groups who made a single hit song and were never heard from again. Periodically radio stations that specialize in classic rock will devote a weekend to these one-hit wonders"

(David W. Galenson)

Galenson, David W., One Hit Wonders: Why Some of the Most Important Works of Modern Art are Not by Important Artists (November 2004). NBER Working Paper Series, Vol. w10885, pp. -, 2004. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=618522

Fig.1 C. W. McCall (1975). "Convoy"; Fig.2 Promises (1978). "Baby it's You"; Fig.3 The Swingers (1982). "Counting The Beat"; Fig.4 Deee-Lite (1990). "Groove Is In The Heart"; Fig.5 OMC (1995). "How Bizarre"

1
2
3
4
5

TAGS

19751978198219901995 • American Gothic • architects • artistic one-hit wonder • artists • best of • Bring Down the Birds • career • Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris • classic rock • conceptual innovation • early career • greatest hits • hit song • individual works • innovationinnovative ideas • isolated achievements • major works of art • masterpiecemusicmusic videonew approachesnew ideasnovelty • one-hit wonders • painters • popular music • radio stations • sculptors • singers • Vietnam Veterans Memorialvisual artistsWashington DC • works of modern art • young practitioners

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 APRIL 2011

The invention of Film-less Photography: Kodak, 1975

"In December of 1975, after a year of piecing together a bunch of new technology in a back lab at the Elmgrove Plant in Rochester, we were ready to try it. 'It' being a rather odd-looking collection of digital circuits that we desperately tried to convince ourselves was a portable camera. It had a lens that we took from a used parts bin from the Super 8 movie camera production line downstairs from our little lab on the second floor in Bldg 4. On the side of our portable contraption, we shoehorned in a portable digital cassette instrumentation recorder. Add to that 16 nickel cadmium batteries, a highly temperamental new type of CCD imaging area array, an a/d converter implementation stolen from a digital voltmeter application, several dozen digital and analog circuits all wired together on approximately half a dozen circuit boards, and you have our interpretation of what a portable all electronic still camera might look like.

It was a camera that didn't use any film to capture still images - a camera that would capture images using a CCD imager and digitize the captured scene and store the digital info on a standard cassette. It took 23 seconds to record the digitized image to the cassette. The image was viewed by removing the cassette from the camera and placing it in a custom playback device. This playback device incorporated a cassette reader and a specially built frame store. This custom frame store received the data from the tape, interpolated the 100 captured lines to 400 lines, and generated a standard NTSC video signal, which was then sent to a television set.

There you have it. No film required to capture and no printing required to view your snapshots. That's what we demonstrated to many internal Kodak audiences throughout 1976. In what has got to be one of the most insensitive choices of demonstration titles ever, we called it 'Film-less Photography'. Talk about warming up your audience!"

(Steve Sasson, 16 October 2007)

Fig.1 Vintage 1975 portable all electronic still camera

Fig.2 The playback device and TV

Fig.3 Side-by-side comparison – Hardcopy vs. Film-less Photography

1

2

3

TAGS

1975applied research • Bob DeYager • camera • camera prototype • capturecassette • CCD • design conceptdevicedigitaldiscovery • electronic photo album • electronic still camera • Elmgrove Plant • experimentation • film-less photography • frame store • Gareth Lloyd • industrial designinterpolationinvention • Jim Schueckler • Kodak • Kodak Apparatus Division Research Laboratory • new technologyNTSCphotographypioneering • playback system • portable camera • product designprototyperesearch centre • Rick Osiecki • Rochester • Steve Sasson • still imagesSuper 8 movie cameratechnologyvideo

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 JUNE 2009

Die entfesselte Kamera

"Eine Zusammenstellung der besten und berühmtesten langen Kamerafahrten muss natürlich mit Murnau beginnen. Hier das Treffen des Mannes mit seiner Geliebten in Sunrise (1927) [1] Der Banküberfall in Gun Crazy (Joseph H. Lewis, 1950), in einer einzigen Einstellung aus dem Auto gefilmt [2] Die Kamera aus der Ich-Perspektive ... Madame de ... (Max Ophuls, 1953) - nach dem Vorspann ab Minute 1:50 [3] Touch of Evil von Orson Welles (1958), mit der wohl so ziemlich berühmtesten Kamerafahrt [4] Godard ('Eine Kamerafahrt ist eine Frage der Moral.') und sein Weekend (1967) [5] Antonionis Beruf: Reporter (1975) [6] In den letzten zehn bis zwanzig Jahren werden extrem lange Kamerafahrten immer häufiger. Zum einen aufgrund der besseren technischen Möglichkeiten (die Steadycam gibt es seit Mitte der 70er Jahre, Antonioni musste für seine bahnbrechenden Aufnahmen in Beruf: Reporter noch komplizierte Konstruktionen zu Hilfe nehmen) - und zum anderen als Gegenentwicklung, als Ruhepol zu der immer höher werdenden Schnittfrequenz, die mit dem Musikclipsender MTV begann und jüngst mit den Batman- und Jason-Bourne-Filmen einen Höhepunkt erreicht hat. In Martin Scorseses Goodfellas (1990) folgt die Kamera Henry, wie er mit seiner Freundin über den Hintereingang einen Club betritt. Dabei wird unnachahmlich illustriert, welch privilegierte Stellung er genießt [7] Aus Murnaus entfesselter Kamera war zu diesem Zeitpunkt schon ein so beliebtes Stilmittel geworden, dass es Zeit für etwas Ironie wurde. Das zeigt die Anfangssequenz in Robert Altmans The Player (1992), in der sich zwei Darsteller über die besten tracking shots der Filmgeschichte unterhalten [8] Einige besonders kreative Höhepunkte sind seit den 90er Jahren im Genre des Hongkong-Thrillers zu finden. So in John Woos Hard Boiled (1992) [9] Die ersten sieben Minuten von Breaking News (2004) von Johnnie To [10] Ziemlich eindrucksvoll ist auch diese Szene aus The Protector von Prachya Pinkaew (2005) [11] Höhepunkt und Abgesang? In Joe Wrights Atonement von 2007 gerät die knapp fünfminütige Sequenz mit den Landungstruppen am Strand zu einem fast schon aufdringlichen Muskelspiel (ab 0:47) [12] Weitere Beispiele?"
(Thorsten Funke, 20. Juni 2009)

Films famous for their use of single continuous shots:
Sunrise (Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau, 1927); Gun Crazy (Joseph H. Lewis, 1950); Madame de ... (Max Ophuls, 1953); Touch of Evil (Orson Welles, 1958); Weekend (Jean Luc Godard, 1967); Beruf: Reporter (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1975); Goodfellas (Martin Scorseses, 1990); The Player (Robert Altman, 1992); Hard Boiled (John Woo, 1992); Breaking News (Johnnie To Kei-Fung, 2004); The Protector (Prachya Pinkaew, 2005); Atonement (Joe Wright, 2007).

TAGS

19271950195319581967197519901992200420052007 • Atonement • Beruf Reporter • Breaking News (2004) • cinemadesign • F. W. Murnau • film • Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau • Goodfellas • Gun Crazy • Hard Boiled • Jean-Luc Godard • Joe Wright • John Woos • list • Madame de... • Martin ScorseseMichelangelo AntonionionesingleshotOrson Welles • Prachya Pinkaew • Robert Altmansingle shot • steadicam • Sunrise • The Player • The Protector • Touch of Evil • tracking shotvisual languagevisual literacyvisualisationWeekend

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.