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Which clippings match 'Theodor Holm Nelson' keyword pg.1 of 1
10 OCTOBER 2009

Xanadu: editable, quotable, annotatable; multiple dimensions and views

"2). Everything Must be editable, quotable, annotatable – all the time by everyone. This is not optional. It must, however, be clear what has been modified, and who made the revisions.

3). The same information can be structured–viewed–formatted in various ways. Simultaneously having multiple dimensions and views. Potentially infinite dimensions will allow the same data to be included in vast numbers of sets, lists, and structures. Each user can have many unique personal dimensions linking all the documents they have ever accessed. They will be able to view these dimensions on any Internet connected computer, thus in effect, allowing their complete personal computing environments to follow them to any available screen in the world. By following along their personal time dimension from past through future, it provides a simple chronological organizing structure. You could even have a dimension linking all your favorite dimensions created by others. The real world will be one of the transparent overlays, it will be that other reality. It will be the strongly predominant display in mission critical situations, such as driving and close encounters with loved ones."

(Jack Seay, 6 February 2005)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 JANUARY 2009

The Project Xanadu: Returning to The Original View

"The earliest published design for computer hypertext was a 1965 ACM article (peer–reviewed) which canonically defined our work [0]. One of the authors (Nelson) presented a sweeping view of hypertext as visibly cross–connected by two–way links and transclusions* (illustration from that article reprinted).

* I define 'transclusion' as 'the same content knowably in more than one place'; therefore, any presentation which indicates the identity or origins of media content. There are other meanings of 'transclusion' which are special cases. For instance, 'transdelivery' means bringing content from elsewhere, 'transquotation' means explicit quotation which remains connnected to its origins. Vannevar Bush's famous 'trails,' described in 1945 [1], were transclusions, not links."
(Theodor Holm Nelson and Robert Adamson Smith)

0). Theodor H. Nelson, "A File Structure for the Complex, the Changing and the Indeterminate." Proceedings of the ACM 20th National Conference (1965), pp. 84–100.

1). Vannevar Bush, "As We May Think." Atlantic Monthly, July 1945; on line at elsewhere.

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TAGS

1965ACM • As We May Think • hyperlinkhypertext systeminfluential workspioneeringProject Xanaduquotation • Robert Adamson Smith • seminaltechnologyTed NelsonTheodor Holm Nelson • transclusion • transdelivery • transquotation • Vannevar Bush

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 SEPTEMBER 2008

A body of literature is a system of interconnected writings

"A [body of] literature is a system of interconnected writings. We do not offer this as our definition, but as a discovered fact. And almost all writing is part of some literature.

These interconnections do not exist on paper except in rudimentary form, and we have tended not to be aware of them. We see individual documents but not the literature, just as people see other individuals but tend not to see the society or culture that surround them.

The way people read and write is based in large part on these interconnections.

A person reads an article. He or she says to himself or herself, 'Where have I seen something like that before? Oh, yes' –– and the previous connection is brought mentally into play."
(Ted Nelson)

Literary MACHINES 1980 bis 1987, by Theodor Holm NELSON ISBN 0–893467–056–2

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TAGS

hypertext • interconnections • intertwingled • intertwingularitylink • Literary Machines • literatureProject XanadureferenceTed NelsonTheodor Holm Nelson

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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