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Which clippings match 'Intertextuality' keyword pg.2 of 3
21 MARCH 2011

Mise en Abyme: the mirror in the text

"In a work of art, I rather like to find thus transposed, at the level of the characters, the subject of the work itself. Nothing sheds more light on the work or displays the proportions of the whole work more accurately. Thus, in paintings by Memling or Quentin Metzys, a small dark convex mirror reflects, in its turn, the interior of the room in which the action of the painting takes place. Thus, in a slightly different way, in Velasquez's Las Meninas. Finally, in literature, there is the scene in which a play is acted in Hamlet; this also happens in many other plays. In Wilhelm Meister, there are the puppet shows and the festivities in the castle. In Fall of the House of Usher, there is the piece that is read to Roderick, etc. None of these examples is absolutely accurate. What would be more accurate, and what would explain better what I'd wanted to do in my Cabiers, in Narcisse and La Tentative, would be a comparison with the device from heraldry that involves putting a second representation of the original shield 'en abyme' within it."

(Lucien Dällenbach, 1977 via Once I Metablog on Metafiction)

Dällenbach, Lucien (1977). 'The Mirror in the Text'. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Fig.1 Diego Velázquez 'Las Meninas'

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TAGS

1656 • Andre Gide • Diego Velazquez • Fall of the House of Usher • Hamlet • Hans Memling • heraldic shield • heraldry • infinite regressionintertextualityLas Meninasmeta-painting • metablog • metafiction • metaplay • metatheatre • metatheatricalitymirrormise-en-abyme • Quentin Metzys • recursionreflexivityrepetitionrepresentation • Wilhelm Meister • William Shakespearework of art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 NOVEMBER 2009

Intertextual Enterprises: Writing Alternative Places and Meanings in the Media Mixed Networks of Yugioh

"The media mix of Pokemon, and subsequent series such as Digimon and Yugioh, create a virtual world that manifests in multiple media forms, and though which consumers can craft their own narrative trajectories through play with video and card games (Allison 2002; Tobin 2004a). This is a networked world of expanding reference that destabilizes the prior orthodoxy of children's media (Tobin 2004a). Rather than spoon–feed stabilized narratives and heroes to a supposedly passive audience, Pokemon and Yugioh invite children to collect, acquire, recombine, and enact stories within their peer networks, trading cards, information, and monsters (Buckingham and Sefton–Green 2004; Yano 2004) in what Sefton–Green has called a 'knowledge industry' (Sefton–Green 2004, 151). These media mixes challenge our ideas of childhood agency and the passivity of media consumption, highlighting the active, entrepreneurial, and technologized aspects of children's engagement with popular culture. They also create a proliferating set of contact points between practice, media, and imaginings, as players perform and identify with media characters in multiple and often unexpected ways.

An early draft of a paper published in Debbora Battaglia Ed. Encountering the Extraterrestrial: Anthropology in Outerspaces. Duke University Press. 2005. This paper was first presented at the 2002 meetings of the American Anthropological Association"

(Mimi Ito)

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2005 • alternative places • card gamechildhood agencychildrens mediacollaborationcollectcommunityconsumersDigimondigital culture • enact • engagemententrepreneurshipgamesheroesimaginingsinteractionintertextuality • knowledge industry • media characters • media consumption • media mix • Mimi Itomonster • narrative trajectories • narrativesnetworked worldorthodoxypassive audience • peer networks • play • players • Pokemonpopular culture • recombine • social interaction • stabilisation • story • technologised • trading cardsvideovirtual worldYugioh

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 FEBRUARY 2009

Duck Amuck: classic cartoon meta-subject

"There's an authorial consciousness and meta narrative that's noticeably at play in many of the Bugs Bunny cartoons. In fact, the opening of this film started out with the well–known ending, "That's All Folks!" which was then corrected by Bugs to say, "That's Not All Folks!"––a phrase that included copyediting marks. So we know from the start that the narrative is all a game, that beginnings and endings (or any traditional narrative arc) shouldn't be taken seriously, and that Bugs will always toy with our expectations.

One episode stood out spectacularly. In Duck Amuck (created in 1953), Daffy Duck is exquisitely tortured by his creator. In the course of the film the animator messes with and changes the scenery, interchanges props, replaces the soundtrack, mutes Daffy, and even erases and physically alters Daffy himself. For example, as Daffy strolls with a ukulele, singing a lazy, tropical song, he's tossed into a variety of climates, ending up in the snow (you can almost hear the animator laughing––at Daffy and in celebration of his artistic, cruel freedom). Daffy keeps trying to live––and entertain––but he can't maintain any constancy or control of his surroundings, or even his body."
(Lit Matters , 15 December 2007)

[Duck Amuck can be interpreted as a (playful) allegory to Christian mythology where Daffy Duck represents humanity and Bugs Bunny (his creator) represents 'God'.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 DECEMBER 2008

Visual joke used to promote comic book convention

Fig.1 Strip Dagen Houten 22 en 23 Oktober 2005, Euretco Expo Center [http://stripdagen.nl]

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TAGS

2005adadvertisingAmsterdamBBDOcomic book • comic book convention • design • fart • flatulenceintertextualitymarketingmetaphorvisual depictionvisual jokevisual literacyvisual punvisual vernacularvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 OCTOBER 2008

Playful Revisions of Fine Art Masters

[Revision of "Gabrielle d'Estrées and one of her Sisters" – by unknown master of the second school of Fontainebleau, and Edvard Munch's The Scream]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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