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04 MAY 2015

Beyond Bloomsbury: Designs of the Omega Workshops 1913-19

"Established in 1913 by the painter and influential art critic Roger Fry, the Omega Workshops were an experimental design collective, whose members included Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant and other artists of the Bloomsbury Group.

Well ahead of their time, the Omega Workshops brought the experimental language of avant-garde art to domestic design in Edwardian Britain. They were a laboratory of design ideas, creating a range of objects for the home, from rugs and linens to ceramics, furniture and clothing – all boldly coloured with dynamic abstract patterns. No artist was allowed to sign their work, and everything produced by the Workshops bore only the Greek letter Ω (Omega)."

(The Courtauld Institute of Art)

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TAGS

1913 • 1919 • Alvaro Guevara • art movement • avant-garde art movement • Bloomsbury Group • bold new designs • British designceramicsclothing design • Cuthbert Hamilton • decorative artsdesign collectivedesign history • design of domestic products • Duncan Grant • Edward McKnight Kauffer • Edward Morgan ForsterEdward Wadsworth • Edward Wolfe • Frederick Etchells • furniture designGeorge Bernard Shaw • Gertrude Stein • Henri Gaudier-Brzeska • home furnishingsinterior design • Israel Zangwill • Jesse Etchells • Lady Ian Hamilton • Lady Maud Cunard • Lady Ottoline Morrell • linen design • linocutlithography • Mikhail Larionov • mosaicnew approaches • Nina Hamnett • Omega artists • Omega Workshops • painted furniture • painted murals • painted silks and linens • Pamela Diamand • Roger Fry • rug • Somerset House • stained glasstablewaretextile design • The Courtauld Institute of Art • upholstery • Vanessa Bell • vibrant abstract design • Virginia WoolfWilliam Butler Yeats • Winifred Gill • woodblock prints • woven wools • Wyndham Lewis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 NOVEMBER 2013

Own Label Sainsbury's Design Studio 1962-1977

"In 1962, when Peter Dixon joined the Sainsbury's Design Studio, a remarkable revolution in packaging design began. The supermarket was developing its distinctive range of Own Label products, and Dixon's designs for the line were revolutionary: simple, stripped down, creative, and completely different from what had gone before. Their striking modernity pushed the boundaries, reflecting a period full of optimism. They also helped build Sainsbury's into a brand giant, the first real 'super' market of the time. This book examines and celebrates this paradigm shift that redefined packaging design, and led to the creation of some of the most original packaging ever seen.

Produced in collaboration with the Sainsbury family and The Sainsbury Archive, the book reveals an astonishing and exhaustive body of work. A unique insight into what and how we ate, the packaging is presented using both scanned original flat packets and photographic records made at the time. With an essay by Emily King featuring interviews with Peter Dixon and Lord Sainsbury of Preston Candover."

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TAGS

1960s19621970sbrandBritish designcolour fielddesign aestheticsdesign simplicitydesign studio • Emily King • food labelformalist design aesthetics • FUEL (design group) • graphic designgraphic design collectiongraphic design historyinformation design • John Sainsbury • labelmodernist aestheticsmodernity • Own Label (book) • packagingpackaging design • packets • Peter Dixon • photographic records • plain packproduct packagingSainsburys • Sainsburys Design Studio • Sainsburys Own Label • simple design • stripped down • supermarket • The Sainsbury Archive • UK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 APRIL 2011

The Design Research Unit: 1942 -72 [UK touring exhibition]

Friday 15 April – Friday 13 May 2011, Bonington Gallery, Bonington building, NTU City site, Nottingham, UK. This is a Cubitt Gallery touring exhibition.

"Formed in London in 1942, The Design Research Unit were responsible for some of the most important design produced in post–war Britain. They pioneered a model for multidisciplinary practice, being the first consultancy in the country to bring together expertise in architecture, graphics and industrial design. By the 1970s it was one of the largest and most established design offices in Europe.

This exhibition is the first of its kind, mapping the history of the group and the currency of their designs. It spans more than four decades of their work, focusing on some of their most significant projects and charting their ambition to bring elegant and functional design to all sections of society. It covers three phases of activity; the group's early origins and founder members, initial work in exhibition design and the Unit's role in devising some of the first and most comprehensive corporate design schemes commissioned for British industry.

The Design Research Unit: 1942 –72 will be open to the general public on 15 April 2011. Admission is free."

(Nottingham Trent University, UK)

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TAGS

19421970s2011architectureauthorshipBonington GalleryBritish designBritish industryBritish Rail • commercial design • consultancy • corporate design • corporate identitycreative practice • Cubitt Gallery • design formalismdesign historydesign researchDesign Research UnitDRUexhibitionexhibition designgraphicshistoryindustrial designinterdisciplinaryNottinghamNTUpioneeringpostwarrail • touring exhibition • UKvisual communication

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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