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Which clippings match '2008' keyword pg.1 of 20
29 JANUARY 2017

Jonathan McIntosh: Building a Critical Culture with Remix Video

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2008appropriationArs Electronica Festival • blip.tv • critical culture • critical perspectivescut-up techniquecut-up videosDIY media • identity correction ad • Jonathan McIntosh • political prankster • political remix video • recontextualising found objects • remix video • social critiquesocial norms • subversive remix video • transformative video remix • transformative workvideo remixYouTube video

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 SEPTEMBER 2016

George Lakoff: Idea Framing, Metaphors, and Your Brain

UC Berkeley Professor George Lakoff discusses concepts from his 2008 book, The Political Mind: Why You Can't Understand 21st-Century American Politics with an 18th-Century Brain.

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2008brain networks • breaking the frame • Charles Fillmore • cognitive linguistics • cognitive strategy • Commonwealth Club of California • conceptual framing • cultural narratives • embodied mind • Erving Goffman • fora.tv • frame analysis • frame elements • framingGeorge Lakoff • human thinking • idea framing • institutions • Jerry Feldman • Joe Epstein • linguistic construction • linguisticsmetaphormetaphor analysis • metaphors are political • metaphors structure our thinking • mutual inhibition • neural circuit • neural computation • political behaviour • political behaviour and society • primary metaphor • Rockridge Institute • roles • scenarios • structured frames • the way we think • thinking in terms of metaphors

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 FEBRUARY 2016

Tomás Saraceno: Galaxies Forming along Filaments, Like Droplets along the Strands of a Spider’s Web (2008)

"In his dramatic installation Galaxies Forming along Filaments, Like Droplets along the Strands of a Spider's Web (2008) Tomas Saraceno applied another analogy inspired by that finding: the comparison between our 'spongy' universe and a complex spider web in which groups of stars and other matter are strung like shining beads of water along invisible strands. Saraceno, a former architect known for following in the tradition of other maverick designers who have developed provocatively inventive projects with the goal of changing human behaviour and living conditions – such as Buckminster Fuller, Archigram and the Ant Farm group – also has a knack for presenting his conceptual projects in ways that capture the imagination."

(Kristin M. Jones, 2008, Frieze)

Jones, K. M. (2008). "Tomas Saraceno" Frieze(116).

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2008 • airborne biosphere • alternate ways of living • analogyAnt Farm (architecture)Archigramart installationbiosphereblack and whiteBuckminster Fuller • capture the imagination • changing human behaviour • cloud formations • complex networks • conceptual projects • droplet • filament • Frieze (magazine) • galaxies forming • galaxy • inflatable biosphere • inventive projects • invisible strands • large scale workliving conditionsmaterials science • maverick designer • morphology of soap bubbles • network model • network morphology • neural networks • provocatively inventive • shining beads • soap bubbles • speculative models • spider web • sponge • spongy universe • stars • Tomas Saraceno • visual representations of mathematical conceptswaterweb of connectionswhite box

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 OCTOBER 2015

Social media platform affordances promote phatic communication

"Facebook, for example, encourages phatic communication through sociable add-ons like 'vampire bites', 'zombies', 'hot potatoes' and automating messages encouraging participation between friends in quizzes, film taste reviews and the like.[6] Furthermore, Facebook's new 'beacon' technology creates an environment where one's online purchases and interests get relayed to one's network of friends through automated communication. Twitter encourages phatic communication through the imposed limits of the medium itself. The 160 character limit for messages creates brevity in communication. The lack of a private messaging facility, promotes generic 'announcements' over dialogue or targeted conversation. "

(Vincent Miller, 2008, p.398)

[6] For example, a typical automated message such as ''Mr X' has challenged you to a movie quiz' suggests a personal invitation to compete. However, it is usually the case that if 'Mr X' has participated in a movie quiz, you will, by default, be automatically 'challenged' to the quiz, by virtue of being friends with 'Mr X'.

Miller, V. (2008). "New Media, Networking and Phatic Culture." Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies 14(4): 387–400.

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2008 • activity patterns • announcements • automated communication • automated messagesbrevitycharacter limitconstant connection • conversation for its own sake • Facebookfriendship networks • generic announcements • grooming talking • hot potatoe • I share therefore I am • imposed limits • linguisticsmedium limitationonline activitiesonline followersperformativitypersonal interests • phatic communication • phatic communion • phatic expression • phatic speech • relationship communication • self-disclosureshare your interestssharing personal informationsharing platformshow and tellsmall talk • sociable add-on • social groomingsocial practices • social task • spectacular society • speech act • status updatethe mediumTwitterutterances • vampire bite • Vincent Miller • zombie

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 JUNE 2015

A Game of One's Own: Towards a New Gendered Poetics of Digital Space

"In the opening pages of her classic essay, A Room of Ones Own, Virginia Woolf describes being blocked from entering the 'turf' of the University in Oxbridge by an administrative gate-keeper.

Instantly a man's figure rose to intercept me. … His face expressed horror and indignation. Instinct rather than reason came to my help, he was a Beadle; I was a woman. This was the turf; there was the path. Only the Fellows and Scholars are allowed here; the gravel is the place for me' (Woolf, 1929).

This scene invokes the ways in which women have been systematically barred from the digital playground, both as players and as creators of play space. To a large extent, the video game industry in the U.S. remains dominated by a boys-only ethos that harkens back to the gender-biased practices in the British academia of Woolf's day.[1] Games that are female-friendly are often couched in derogatory or dismissive terms: The Sims (Maxis, 2000) is 'not really a game'; casual games are not counted as 'real' games by many in the industry.[2] The result is that certain types of games, game mechanics, play patterns, and, as we'll see, particular types of game spaces have tended to dominate the field of games.

Although this paper discusses the ways in which digital game spaces have been strongly gendered towards male constructions of space and play, this does not necessarily mean we advocate creating exclusively female (or 'pink') games. As Woolf points out in her essay, the solution is not simply to create a distinctly feminine voice (although this is one potential angle of approach), but rather to promote the cultivation of an 'androgynous mind', which, she suggests, is already possessed by male authors of great note throughout history (she cites Shakespeare as an example). We propose drawing from a number of cultural practices, literary sources, and existing games in order to pave the way for a playground that is more open to female players. Thus we promote not only the definition of new feminine game spaces, but also encourage designers to think in terms of 'androgynous space' that engages all aspects of all persons: a space into which women and girls are invited and welcomed, but in which men and boys can also enjoy more diverse and nuanced forms of play than are typically available to them."

(Tracy Fullerton, Jacquelyn Ford Morie and Celia Pearce, "A Game of One's Own: Towards a New Gendered Poetics of Digital Space", The Fibreculture Journal : 11)

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2008 • A Room of Ones Own (1929) • androgynous mind • androgynous space • boys-only ethos • British academia • casual gamesCelia Pearce • concepts of space • contested spaces • cultural practices • dangerous spaces • digital game spaces • digital playgrounddigital spacedolls house • domestic spaces • emotional space • enchanted worlds • female games • female players • female-friendly spaces • feminine conceptions of space • feminine game spaces • feminine voiceFibreculture Journal • game design as cultural practice • game mechanic • game spaces • games industrygames research • gender-biased practices • gendered spaces • gendered technology • gendered voices • gendering game space • Jacquelyn Ford Morie • male authors • male constructions of play • male constructions of space • MMOG • narrative spaces • nuanced forms of play • Oxbridge • pink games • play patterns • play spaces • poetics of digital space • procedural space • real games • regendered play space • regendering game space • secret places • social spacesThe Sims (2000) • Tracy Fullerton • video games industryVirginia Woolfvirtual spacesWilliam Shakespeare • women and games

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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