Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Sculptor' keyword pg.1 of 2
16 MARCH 2016

Lucea: kinetic sculpture by artist Anthony Howe

1

TAGS

aesthetic spectacle • algorithmic logic • Anthony Howe • artistelegancefractal patterngenerative designgeometry • kaleidoscopic • kinetic sculptorkinetic sculpturemovementmoving machinesNorth American artistoptical art • Orcas Island • outdoor works • perpetual motion • sculptorsculpturestainless steelsymmetrical balancesymmetrical patternsymmetry • Walla Walla Foundry • wind sculpture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 JUNE 2014

Louise Bourgeois: a conversation with Bernard Marcadé 1993

"La vieille dame qui traverse la rue au bras d'un jeune homme barbu, c'est elle, Louise Bourgeois (1911–2010), dont l'histoire nous est d'abord brossée à grands traits par le biais de photographies tirées des archives familiales. La rencontre en chair et en os a lieu chez elle et dans son atelier, à Brooklyn, où elle entreprend une exégèse de son oeuvre dans une optique résolument psychanalytique. Rythmé par la visite de quatre sculptures ou "cellules" ("Choisy", "Hands and Glass Balls", "Arch of Hysteria", "Eves and Mirrors") avant leur départ pour la Biennale de Venise en 1993, l'entretien avec Bernard Marcadé et Jerry Gorovoy est placé sous le signe de la maison (familiale et symbolique) comme matrice de l'oeuvre. Au traumatisme de base, "fissure de la cellule familiale", car le père ramenait quantité de maîtresses, s'ajoute sa moquerie quant à l'absence de phallus de la petite fille. La passion pour la géométrie aux lois immuables, l'emboîtement des pièces, devient alors recherche de perfection et ironie : démolir des formes est posé en équation avec la destruction du père. L'oeuvre, riche en retournements, émerge du discours par l'humour et la vigueur des "show–off" de mamelles ou divers phallus érigés et animalisés."

Fig.1 Paru en 1993 chez CNC [Centre national de la cinématographie], [Paris] dans la collection Images de la culture / Mémoire | Camille Guichard.

1
2

3

TAGS

199320th century artart work • arte video • artistbalance • Bernard Marcade • biopic • Brooklyn • Camille Guichard • Centre Georges Pompidou • destruction of the father • erect phallus • explicit sexual imageryfatherfemale artistfrancais • French artist • Jerry Gorovoy • Louise Bourgeois • memoire • New York • peeling an orange • psychoanalysis • Reunion des musees nationaux • sculptor • search of perfection • sexually explicit work • shock artshow and tell • Sunday salon • Terra Luna Films • Venice Biennale • women artists

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 APRIL 2014

Jean Tinguely: Art, Machines and Motion

"Jean Tinguely exhibited in a show titled 'Art, Machines and Motion' at the Kaplan Gallery, London, in November 1959. In conjunction with that exhibition, Tinguely held a conference and performance at the Institute of Contemporary Art on November 16 titled 'Static, Static, Static! Be Static!' During the event, 1.5 km of paper drawn by two cyclists on his meta–matic bicycle were spread through the audience while Tinguely read his theory of movement and machines simultaneously heard on radio in Paris."

(Rosemary O'Neill, p.159)

Rosemary O'Neill (2011). Total Art and Fluxus in Nice. "Art and Visual Culture on the French Riviera, 1956–1971: The Ecole De Nice", Ashgate Publishing Limited.

1
2
3

TAGS

1959abstract artanarchicart exhibition • Art Machines and Motion (exhibition) • auto-generateavant-garde artistsbicycleBritish Pathecontraptiondo-it-yourself • Ewan Phillips • generative artgenerative compositional techniqueInstitute of Contemporary Artsinteractive artironicJean Tinguely • Kaplan Gallery • kinetic sculptureLondonmachine aestheticmachinesmechanical device • meta-matic bicycle • meta-maticsmid 20th-centurymotion • movement and machines • moving machinesnewsreel • Nouveau Realistes • paperParisplayfulradiorobot artrobotised assemblagessculptorsculpture • speed sculpture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 OCTOBER 2012

Plato Art Space: Ilhan Koman and Candas Sisman's 'Flux'

"Famous Turkish sculptor İlhan Koman's boat Hulda arrives in İstanbul, its final destination, after its long journey which began in Stockholm. Hulda was both Koman's home and studio during his residence in Stockholm.

The exhibition consists of the photographs and videos from Hulda's journey, 10 original sculptures such as Whirlpool and Dervish by İlhan Koman and a video –dedicated to İlhan Koman– by young artist Candaş Şişman. The photographs and videos are from the cities Hulda visited during its journey –Stockholm, Amsterdam, Bordeaux, Lisbon, Barcelona, Naples, Malta, Thessalonica and İstanbul. The exhibition in Plato Art Space is also the final leg of the activities of Hulda Festival (www.huldafestival.org).

The exhibition is also undertaking the mission of building a bridge between young generation artists and Koman by presenting Candaş Şişman's work. Şişman's video Flux is influenced by Koman's sculptures (Pi, Moebius, Whirlpool and Ogre) and is dedicated to İlhan Koman's inspiring art. The video has a sound design which is also inspired by the materials of Koman's sculptures and is produced by Candaş Şişman.

The exhibition is curated by Yıldırım Arıcı and accompanied by a reader (published by Plato College of Higher Education) and it is featuring texts by Çetin Kanra, Aykut Köksal, Abidin Dino, Ferit Edgü, Burcu Beşlioğlu and a poem by Oktay Rıfat. "

(Plato Art Space, İstanbul contemporary art)

Fig.1 "Flux", Candaş Şişman, Hulda Festival 21 September 2010 – 23 November 2010 İstanbul, Turkey.

1
2

3

4

5

6

TAGS

20103D animation • Abidin Dino • abstractionAmsterdamanimated sculptureanimationarchitectural formsartistartwork • Aykut Koksal • Barcelona • Bordeaux • Burcu Beslioglu • Candas Sisman • Cetin Kanra • contemporary art • Dervish • design formalismexhibition • Ferit Edgu • generative artgeometry • Hulda • Hulda Festival • Ilhan Koman • Istanbulkinetic sculptureLisbonMaltamaterial moving in space • Moebius (sculpture) • morphNaples • Ogre (sculpture) • Oktay Rifat • Pi (sculpture) • Plato Art Space • Plato College of Higher Education • primitive logicprimitive shapessculptorsculpturesound designStockholm • Thessalonica • TurkeyTurkish media art • Whirlpool (sculpture) • Yildirim Arici

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 AUGUST 2012

Touch me, hold me: Franz West's anti-modernist aesthetic

"'Don't Touch' is an unspoken warning in any art museum. Sometimes an institution might post a sign explaining to visitors why touching the art on view is bad – not just for the obvious catastrophic reasons, but because even oils from hands that appear to be clean can cause incremental damage. Mostly, though, visitors already know what they are (or, rather, aren't) supposed to do in art's presence.

Touch is a privilege typically reserved for the artist who made the art, as well as its professional caretakers. In fact, 'the artist's touch' has been a central value in Western art for hundreds of years.

By the start of the 1960s, with the Abstract Expressionist generation of American painters riding high, it had even become something of a fetish. The loaded brush, the whiplash line, poured paint, the palette knife and sponge – signs of distinctive gestures mattered, almost like handwriting. De–mythologizing the artist's touch was left to Andy Warhol, who announced that he instead wanted to be a machine, and to Sol LeWitt and his idea–oriented cohort of Conceptual artists. They pulled the plug for good.

Enter Franz West, the impish Viennese artist whose compelling retrospective is at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Born in 1947, West is a generation younger than Warhol and LeWitt. The fetish for the artist's touch having been retired just before he arrived on the scene, he took the next step. In the mid–1970s, West handed things over to the audience.

Literally.

Wrapping pieces of wood and cardboard and lengths of wire with gauze, coating it in plaster or papier mâché and painting the whole thing white, West made sculptures that the audience was meant to pick up, manipulate, examine at close range, hang on an arm or around the neck, or even stick one's face into. The shapes are abstract. But often, part of the sculpture suggests a handle – a direct visual invitation to audience participation. Silently it says, Touch me, hold me.

Other shapes appear designed to fit around the neck, under the arm or on other embraceable parts of the body. Or, they echo bodily orifices. (Can a sculpture have a belly button?) A glass bottle at the end of a long stick, both embedded in lumpy papier mâché, looks like a ritual implement meant to be passed around in some primitive religious ceremony.

These materials also evoke the damaged condition art holds in contemporary life. Like a cast made for a broken limb, white plaster and gauze result in sculptures bound in a medical dressing.

West calls these sculptures 'Passstücke' –– originally translated as 'fitting pieces' (passende Stücke) but now referred to as 'adaptives.' In biology, adaptation is a structure or form modified to fit a changing environment. West's touch–me sculptures attempted the same for art's new circumstance."

(Los Angeles Times, 31 March 2009)

1

2

TAGS

2009 • Abstract Expressionist • adaptives (art) • affordancesAndy Warhol • anti-modernist aesthetic • artart museumartist • arts new circumstance • audienceAustrian artistcleanlinessconceptual art • dont touch • examine • Franz West • handlehold me • incremental damage • instructions for use • LACMA • loaded brush • Los Angeles County Museum of ArtLos Angeles Times • manipulate • mid-1970s • paper macheparticipationparticipatory process • passende stucke • passstucke • pick up • ritual implement • sculptorsculptureSol LeWitt • the artists touch • touchtouch me • touching • visual invitation • warning • western art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.