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Which clippings match 'Le Corbusier' keyword pg.1 of 2
13 JULY 2014

The Fountainhead: a testament to uncompromising individualism

"The work of Rand, most of it published between the 1940s and 1960s, was very popular in the United States and gained a large and still active following. Rand developed her own school of philosophy called Objectivism, that centers on the principle of selfishness. In her novels and philosophical works, Rand advocates a form of rational and ethical egoism, and a political order based on laissezfaire capitalism. Her two novels, Fountainhead (1943) and Atlas Shrugged (1957) are lengthy portrayals of strong individuals who heroically and steadfastly pursue their lives according to Rand's philosophical principles."

(P.W. Zuidhof, p.84, 2012)

Zuidhof, P. W. (2012). "Ayn Rand: Fountainhead of neoliberalism?" Krisis: Journal for contemporary philosophy(1).

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19431949American dreamarchitect • artistic vision • Atlas ShruggedAyn Rand • battle of wills • challenging conventionscollectivismcompromiseconventionalitycreative geniusdesign commissioningdesign conventions • Edward Carrere • egoegoism • ethical egoism • fear of failure • form and function • form follows function • Frank Lloyd Wrightfree willfunctionalism • Gary Cooper • Howard Roark • human actionidealism • independent-mindedness • individualism • integrity • International Styleisolated sort of geniuslaissez faire capitalismLe CorbusierLudwig Mies van der Rohemelodramamodernist architecturemodernist idealsmoral purposeneoliberalismnewspaper tycoonnon-conformistobjectivismoptimistic idealPatricia Neal • personal integrity • personal visionpowerquestioning traditionsradical architecture • rational egoism • rational self-interest • rise to power • romantic notion of the artist • rousing speech • self-interestselfishnessskyscraper • smear campaign • struggle in obscurity • The Fountainhead • uncompromising integrity • uncompromising vision • weak-mindedness • William Kueh

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 SEPTEMBER 2013

Handmade in Britain: The Story of Wallpaper

"In the second programme in the series, presenter Paul Martin reveals the secret history of wallpaper from the 17th century to the present day.

The film explores how wallpaper, seemingly so fragile and easy to replace, provides a vital index of changing tastes in the home. The programme shows how from its earliest days wallpaper imitated other, more costly wall coverings: from the 17th–century papers that were designed to look like embroidered textiles to 18th–century flocked wallpapers. The latter, intended as a cheaper substitute for costly damasks or velvets, became a triumph of British innovation, coming to grace the grandest of state apartments and country house interiors.

Focussing on how wallpaper was actually made, the programme goes onto explore how it became one of the battlefields in discussions about design in the 19th century. For, although technological innovations in machine printing had allowed manufacturers to print elaborate designs with complex colour–ways, some commentators were shocked by the poor aesthetic quality of British wallpapers. The programme looks at how designers and reformers attempted to take the situation in hand: from 'The False Principles of Design', an exhibition organised by Sir Henry Cole, the first Director of the Victoria and Albert Museum, which sought to instruct the British public in good and bad design; to the pioneering work of Augustus Pugin and William Morris.

Finally, the film traces the fortunes of wallpaper in the 20th century. Patterned walls faced stiff competition from the purity of plain, painted or whitewashed walls, as advocated by modernists like Le Corbusier. However, new techniques, like screen–printing, allowed shorter runs of innovate wallpapers, which were aimed at architects and interior designers. And, as Paul Martin discovers, wallpaper is still flourishing at the beginning of the 21st century. A combination of digital printing, screen–printing and hand–printing allows companies, like Timorous Beasties, to produce exciting new designs.

Presented by Paul Martin, contributors include Christine Woods, Anthony Wells–Cole, Martha Armitage, Allyson McDermott and Paul Simmons (Timorous Beasties), as well as V&A experts."

First broadcast on 25 September 2013 on BBC Four as part of the Handmade in Britain series [http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03bm1rg].

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16th century17th century18th century19th century20th century21st century • Allyson McDermott • Anthony Wells-Cole • antiqueart and craftsArts and Crafts Movement • Augustus Pugin • bad design • BBC Four • changing tastes • Christine Woods • colourways • damask • deluxe item • design craftdigital printingdomestic material object • elaborate designs • embroidered textiles • flock wallpaper • good design • hand-printing • Handmade in Britain (series) • Henry Cole • industrial grime • interior design • interior designer • interior stylingLe Corbusierluxury • machine printing • makersmanufacturing technology • Marthe Armitage • Palladio Wallpapers • pattern • Paul Martin • Paul Simmons • poisonprinting processscreenprinting • stately homes • technological innovation • The False Principles of Design • Timorous Beasties • two-up-two-down • velvetVictoria and Albert Museum • wall coverings • wallpaperwallpaper design • wallpapering • William Morris

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 APRIL 2013

A history of play equipment design (by theme and by designer)

"Spielplätze sind relevante Orte in der Stadt. Diese Erkenntnis hat in der Zeit zwischen 1945 bis ca. 1970 ein kleine Zahl von Architekten, Landschaftsarchitekten und Künstlern zu neuen Spielkonzepten inspiriert. Die Seite architekturfuerkinder dokumentiert diese Pioniere und ihre Spielplätze und Spielgeräte, weil ihr Ideenreichtum, Zivilcourage, geistige Freiheit und Frechheit faszinieren."

(Gabriela Burkhalter)

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20th centuryad-hocadventure playgroundagencyAldo van EyckAlfred Trachsel • Angel Duarte • Ant Farm (architecture) • architecture for children • Arvid Bengtsson • Bernhard Luginbuhl • Cornelia Hahn Oberlander • Creative Playthings Inc • Egon Moller-Nielsen • Ernst Cramer • experience designexploration of unfolding possibilitiesexploratory experimentation • history of playgrounds • imaginationimpromptu playimprovisationIsamu Noguchi • Jacques Sgard • Jacques Simon • Joseph Brown • jungle gymKuro KanekoLady Allen of Hurtwoodlandscape architecturelandscape designLe Corbusiermake-do playgrounds • Mary Mitchell • Michael Grossert • Mitsuru Senda • NIDO • Niki de Saint Phalle • open-ended play spaces • Palle Nielsen • Paul FriedbergPaul Hoganplace for children • play environments • play spacesplayground • playground equipment • playground spacesplayscapes • Richard Arioli • Richard Dattner • Robert Royston • scriptible spaces • Soren Carl Theodor Marius Sørensen • The Ludic Group

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 MARCH 2013

Lou Loeber: childrens picture book illustrations

"Prentenboek met 18 platen met geometrische gevormde figuren van een van de 'constructivistisch gerichte experimentele schilders' met plaatjes die gemaakt lijken 'met behulp van de tangramdoos' (S. de Bodt. Prentenboeken). Bevat onder andere gedichten en prenten over een vlinder, kippen, spreeuwen, een geitenbok, speelgoed, een varken, de sproeiwagen, een watermannetje, de vuilnisman, lammetjes, spelen met een tol, een interieur met zonnestraal, een kwikstaart, koe en schaap in de wei, een lezend meisje, regen, sneeuwpret en Sinterklaas."

(The Memory of the Netherlands)

Simon Franke (1927). "Gouden Vlinders" picture book illustrated Lou Loeber.

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1927abstract artbook illustrationbutterfly • Charles-Edouard Jeanneret • chickenchildrens bookchildrens book illustrationcityscapeConstructivist-inspiredcowDe Stijldesign formalismdrawingetchingeveryday life • experimental painter • farm • farmyard • gedichtenbundels • geometric figures • glass painting • goat • Gouden Vlinders • human figure • illustration • kunstenaarsboeken • lamb • landscapeLe Corbusierlinocut • Lou Loeber • meadow • modernist aestheticspicture bookPiet Mondrianpigplants • prentenboeken • rain • rubbish collector • Santa Claus • Saskia de Bodt • sheep • Simon Franke • simplified forms • simplified representations • snow • spinning top • starlingsstill life • storybook • tangram box • The Memory of the Netherlands • tightened forms • visual abstractionvisual artwomen in art and design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JUNE 2010

The Open City: The Closed System and The Brittle City

"The idea of an open city is not my own: credit for it belongs to the great urbanist Jane Jacobs in the course of arguing against the urban vision of Le Corbusier. She tried to understand what results when places become both dense and diverse, as in packed streets or squares, their functions both public and private; out of such conditions comes the unexpected encounter, the chance discovery, the innovation. Her view, reflected in the bon mot of William Empson, was that 'the arts result from over–crowding'. Jacobs sought to define particular strategies for urban development, once a city is freed of the constraints of either equilibrium or integration. These include encouraging quirky, jerry–built adaptations or additions to existing buildings; encouraging uses of public spaces which don't fit neatly together, such as putting an AIDS hospice square in the middle of a shopping street. In her view, big capitalism and powerful developers tend to favour homogeneity: determinate, predictable, and balanced in form. The role of the radical planner therefore is to champion dissonance. In her famous declaration: 'if density and diversity give life, the life they breed is disorderly'. The open city feels like Naples, the closed city feels like Frankfurt."

(Richard Sennett, 2006)

Fig.1 Busy street in Naples, marlenworld.com
Fig.2 Paris, Les Olympiades, 1969–1974, Thierry Bézecourt in 2005
[3] Sennett, R. (2006). The Open City: The Closed System and The Brittle City. Urban Age.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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