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Which clippings match 'Safeguarding' keyword pg.1 of 1
07 NOVEMBER 2013

Virtual girl called 'Sweetie' used to stop webcam child sex tourism

"To show how unrestrained child predators can act but also to show how easy it is to track them down the Dutch child rights organisation put itself in the shoes of a 10–year–old Filipino girl. With an innovative technology the virtual character Sweetie was created to be controlled by Terre des Hommes researchers. From a remote building in Amsterdam the researchers operated in public chat rooms. In a very short period, over 20,000 predators from around the world approached the virtual 10– year–old, asking for webcam sex performances. While the adults interacted with the virtual girl, the researchers gathered information about them through social media to uncover their identities. With this evidence Terre des Hommes Netherlands is pushing all governments to adopt proactive investigation policies, with a world wide petition, starting today."

(Hans Guyt, The Hague, 4 November 2013, Terre des Hommes)

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TAGS

20133D visualisationAmsterdamavatarbelievabilitybotchat roomchild abuse • child exploitation • child pornographychild protection • child rights • child sex tourism • child victims • developing nationsdigital actorsexploitation • Filipino • girl • Hans Guyt • human-likehyperrealismillegal behaviourinnovative technologylaw enforcementlifelikelolitaNetherlandsonline youth victimisation • perpetrator • Philippines • post-traumatic stress • posting onlinepredatorprotectionpuppetreal-life dollsafeguardingsex crimesex offenders • sex tourism • sexual acts • sexual exploitationsexual fetishsexual slaverysexualised depictions • Sweetie (virtual girl) • synthespian • Terre des Hommes • victimvirtual charactervirtual girlvisual depictionvoyeurismvulnerabilityvulnerable groupsvulnerable peoplewebcam • webcam child sex tourism • webcam sexyoung childrenyoung people

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 NOVEMBER 2013

The x:talk project: a sex worker-led knowledge sharing co-operative

"In early 2006 several activists based in London who are involved in sex worker rights activism, organising within the International Union of Sex Workers in particular, began to conceptualise and organise around the x:talk project–one that would seek to explore and expand the ideas and confidence we have developed in criticising the mainstream human trafficking discourse, drawing on insights we have gained from sex workers', migrant and feminist struggles.

The racist and anti–feminist trafficking rhetoric of 'protection', mainstream anti–trafficking campaigns that reduce women to only passive victims, under the control of organised crime or of cruel men produces and justifies deportation of migrant sex workers and increases the criminalisation and exploitation of workers in the sex industry. It creates divisions between migrants' and sex workers' forms of organisation and resistance.

We found language and communication to be crucial elements to directly challenge and change conditions of work and life, and to come to together and to organise. Communication is in our view central to change. Language is a basic individual and collective power that improves both possibilities to work and possibilities of resistance.

Central to our vision stands the autonomy of all people moving across borders and the dignity of every gender employing their resources in the sex industry. Central to our understanding of gender and social relations is an understanding of sex work as labour. People who sell sex are involved in a labour process in many respects similar to other paid personal services exchanged on market. At the same time we recognise that the ways in which sex work has existed are also deeply interrelated to the ways in which 'female' services, such as caring, domestic, sexual and reproductive activities are supposed to be provided. It is important to consider that the demand for money for sex in a transparent and potentially contractual way is often a break and significant shift in the way women are expected to give these services for no remuneration.

We consider that a feminist analysis and practice is crucial to changing the sex industry. Women represent the majority of workers in the industry and gendered sexualised and reproductive labour have historically constituted a central part in the structures that subordinate and oppress women. The people that have taken the main initiative of this organisation and project are women. Starting from the ground up, in a grass roots way we nevertheless aim to work with the whole industry. Due to the demographics of the workforce in the sex industry, women play a central role in the organisation and are expected to make up a majority of participants in the classes. We/they represent the majority and we/they enjoy the strongest voice at the moment. However issues of gender and transgender difference–at their intersections with racial and sexual issues are taken into account in the development of activities in order to include people from across the industry and from diverse backgrounds.

In contrast to the current mainstream anti–trafficking policies and discourses we work towards the improvement of working conditions in the sex industry; for rights and recognition of workers; the right to change work and not to be forced to stay with the same employer and the right to stay and not to be deported. Our organisation is based on a practice of sex workers self organisation and our projects are primarily built on an activity of networking with those that have already organised similar projects according to these principles."

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TAGS

2006activism • anti-trafficking campaigns • anti-trafficking discourses • anti-trafficking policies • autonomyborders • co-operative • collective power • criminalisation • cruel men • deportation • dignity • domestic services • empowermentexploitation • female services • feminist analysisfeminist perspectivefeminist struggles • forced labour • gender and social relations • gender difference • gendered labour • grass roots • human trafficking • immigrant experience • International Union of Sex Workers • knowledge sharing • labour process • language barrierslanguage learnerslanguage of thingslanguage skillslanguages of legitimationLondon • migrant sex worker • migrant struggles • migrant workers • organised crime • passive victims • personal services • power relationsprostituteprostitutionprotectionracist language • remuneration • reproductive activities • reproductive labour • rights and recognition • safeguarding • safer conditions • sexsex industry • sex work • sex worker • sex worker rights • sex workers • sexual exploitation • sexual issues • sexual slavery • sexualised labour • subordinate womentrafficking • trafficking rhetoric • transgender difference • victimwomenworkforce • working conditions • x:talk project

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 OCTOBER 2013

The use of social media has the potential for good or harm

"Over the past months we've seen other destructive aspects of the 'net. From death threats tweeted to female MPs and journalists, to the tragic suicides of cyber–bullied teens. Growing concern about the web is understandable and reviews into safeguarding must continue.

Yet alongside healthy caution it's crucial that the technology itself does not become the focus of the blame. Technology is a tool and we get to choose how we use it. When we blame the tool we take the moral onus off ourselves, the user.

From the ability to control fire, to the invention of the wheel or the printing press, each has the potential for great good, or great harm. No tool is completely neutral of course – but we shape them far more than they shape us. That perspective is crucial & empowering."

(Vicky Beeching, 24 October 2013, BBC Radio 4: Thought for the Day)

TAGS

ad press • BBC Radio 4 • blaming tools • cultural technologycyberbullyingdestructive potentialdigital technology • disturbing elements • ethical considerationsFacebookgraphic violence • healthy caution • internet age • internet revolution • invention of the wheel • moral complexities • potential for good • potential for harmprinting presssafeguardingscrutinysocial changesocial mediasocial networking • technical instrumentalism • technological instrumentalismtechnology as neutral • technology industry • technology is a tooltechnology neutralityteen suicideThought for the Day • Vicky Beeching

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MARCH 2010

Police criticise Facebook safety record after Ashleigh Hall murder

"Senior police officers clashed with the UK's most–used social networking site today, accusing Facebook of ignoring worrying trends that it is providing a safe haven for predatory paedophiles by refusing to sign up to a 'panic button' for children and young people.

Jim Gamble, chief executive of the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Unit (Ceop), was joined by the country's lead officer on homicide to tackle the site about its repeated refusal to sign up to a key safety practice adopted by many other similar websites.

The American–owned site has 23 million active users in the UK but refuses to display an official 'panic button' that links users directly to Ceop to report suspected activities by predatory paedophiles.

The police officers spoke out after the conviction of Peter Chapman for the rape and murder of 17–year–old Ashleigh Hall."

(Sandra Laville, 9 March 2010, Guardian crime correspondent )

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TAGS

Ashleigh Hall • CEOP • Child Exploitation and Online Protection Unit • digital cultureethicsFacebookmanipulationmurderonline youth victimisationpaedophilia • panic button • Peter Chapman • predatory paedophiles • rapesafeguardingsafetysex offenderstechnologyUKvulnerability

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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