Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Viewpoint' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 OCTOBER 2013

Filippo Brunelleschi's (re)discovery of Linear Perspective

"When Brunelleschi (re)discovered linear prespective circa 1420, Florentine painters and sculptors became obsessed with it, especially after detailed instructions were published in a painting manual written by a fellow Florentine, Leon Battista Alberti, in 1435. John Berger, an art historian, notes that the convention of perspective fits within Renaissance Humanism because 'it structured all images of reality to address a single spectator who, unlike God, could only be in one place at a time.' In other words, linear perspective eliminates the multiple viewpoints that we see in medieval art, and creates an illusion of space from a single, fixed viewpoint. This suggests a renewed focus on the individual viewer, and we know that individualism is an important part of the Humanism of the Renaissance."

(Beth Harris and Steven Zucker, Smarthistory)

1
2

TAGS

1420 • 3D spaceAncient Greeceart historyEuropean Renaissance • Filippo Brunelleschi • fixed viewpoint • Florence • Giotto di Bondone • Greece • horizon line • illusionistic spaceindividualismJohn BergerKhan AcademyLeon Battista Alberti • linear perspective • mathesismedievalmedieval artmultiple viewpointsperspective viewrediscovered • Renaissance Humanism • Rene Descartessingle perspective point of view • Smarthistory (site) • vanishing point • viewpointvisual illusionvisual perspective • volumetric

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 MAY 2013

Ways In and Out of the Hermeneutic Circle

"In this lecture, Professor Paul Fry examines acts of reading and interpretation by way of the theory of hermeneutics. The origins of hermeneutic thought are traced through Western literature. The mechanics of hermeneutics, including the idea of a hermeneutic circle, are explored in detail with reference to the works of Hans–George Gadamer, Martin Heidegger, and E. D. Hirsch. Particular attention is paid to the emergence of concepts of 'historicism' and 'historicality' and their relation to hermeneutic theory."

(Open Yale Courses, 22 January 2009)

1
2

TAGS

2009 • Alexander Pope • Being and Time (1927) • Christian tradition • circularity • common ground • cult of genius • Eric Donald Hirsch • fore-having • fore-project • fore-structure • Friedrich Schleiermacher • Hans-Georg Gadamerhermeneutic circlehermeneutic horizonhermeneutic theory • hermeneutic thought • hermeneutics • historicality • historicism • history of hermeneutics • imagined whole • interpret meaningsinterpretation • interpretative engagement • Mark Akenside • Martin Heidegger • mechanics of hermeneutics • moving back and forth • Northrop Frye • Open Yale Courses • opinionpart • Paul Fry • preconception • prejudgment • prejudices (prior awareness) • preliminary conception • preliminary idea • prior judgment • Protestant ReformationProtestantismreligion • sacred scripture • Samuel Johnsonscripture • secular scripture • supposed whole • Talmudic scholarship • The Reformation • theory of hermeneutics • theory of literature • transparency of meaningviewpoint • Voruteil • Western literature • whole • Wilhelm Dilthey • William Kurtz Wimsatt • Yale University

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 JULY 2012

Reflection In Action: a shared platform for design discussion

"Reflection In Action is a conversation between two friends and colleagues – Eilidh and Helle.

It started when Eilidh was advising Helle on her thesis project at Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design (CIID). The two of them had many, long, curious and insightful discussions where many ideas emerged about the world of design practice, the methods used and the challenges that accompany it.

After Helle graduated, she like Eilidh was hired by CIID to work within the Consultancy. After a long day of work during a research trip to the US, they found themselves in a dodgy college bar, drinking cheap beer and sketching the idea for Reflection In Action on a napkin. Eilidh and Helle wanted a place to house their ideas and discussion – A platform for reflection and action where they could develop a viewpoint on their daily creative practice and peruse their personal creative interests.

Reflection In Action is a place where they can show credit to the inspiring people they meet, the places they travel, the tools they use, and the experiences that influence who they are as designers."

(Helle Rohde Andersen and Eilidh Dickson)

1
2

TAGS

a place • a platform for reflection and action • back of a napkin • cheap beer • CIID • college bar • conversation between colleagues • conversation between friends • Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Designcreative journey • daily creative practice • Denmark • design challenges • design consultancy • design discussion • design methodsdesign practicedesign toolsdesignersdiscussion • Eilidh Dickson • experiences • Helle Rohde Andersen • house ideas • ideas • ideas emerge • insightful discussions • interaction designinteraction designer • on a napkin • personal blogpersonal creative interests • places to travel to • research trip • Scotland • shared platform • sketching ideasviewpoint

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 SEPTEMBER 2008

The Swastika, Google Earth and reading the world...

"While appearing innocuous from the ground, the striking shape of a construction in San Diego, now on view to internet users accessing Google Earth, is unmistakable – it resembles the Nazi symbol.

Ground–breaking began for the six–building complex at the Coronado US navy base in southern California in 1967. While the original plans called for two central buildings and a single L–shaped barracks, Naval Amphibious Base Complex 320–325 evolved in design. By the time it was finished in 1970 it had four L–shaped buildings – set at right angles. That was when the problem was spotted.

The scheme's architect, John Mock, said this week that while he was aware of the shape as viewed from above he did not think it a true swastika. 'We knew what it was going to look like, but it isn't that. It's four L–shaped buildings ... looking at it from the ground or the air, it still is.'

Forgotten about after the initial controversy, the buildings' form has emerged again as an issue thanks to the internet and Google Earth."

(Dan Glaister, 27 September 2007, The Guardian)

1

2

TAGS

aerial viewarchitectureGoogle Earthlocationsatellite imagessatellite picturesspace • Swastika • symbolsymmetry • US Navy • viewpoint

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.