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Which clippings match 'Community Building' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 APRIL 2014

YouTube: new forms of community, expression, identity, interaction

"This is the third lecture in a series titled 'Digital Natives,' referring to the generation that has been raised with the computer as a natural part of their lives, especially the young people who are currently in schools and colleges today. The series seeks to understand the practices and culture of the digital natives, the cultural implications of their phenomenon and the implications for education to schools, universities and libraries.

According to Wesch, it took tens of thousands of years for writing to emerge after humans spoke their first words. It took thousands more before the printing press appeared and a few hundred again before the telegraph did. Today a new medium of communication emerges every time somebody creates a new web application. 'A Flickr here, a Twitter there, and a new way of relating to others emerges,' Wesch said. 'New types of conversation, argumentation and collaborations are realized.'

Enter YouTube, which is not just a technology. 'It's a social space built around video communication that is searchable, taggable and mashable,' Wesch said. 'It is a space where identities, values and ideas are produced, reproduced, challenged and negotiated in new ways.'"

(Library of Congress, 22 May 2008)

Fig.1 Michael Wesch, 23 June 2008, Library of Congress [http://mediatedcultures.net/]

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TAGS

2008amateur cultural production • anthenticity crisis • anthropologyappropriation • AtheneWins • authenticity • Bomb Iran (song) • Charlie Bit My Finger (2007) • Chevrolet Tahoe • Chevycollaborative productioncommunication mediumcommunity building • connection without constraint • context collapse • cultural anthenticity • demassified mediadigital ethnographydigital nativedigital texts • Dragostea Din Tei • fakesterflash frameFlickr • gaming the system • Gary Brolsma • global connectivity • Hi YouTube • home videohuman interaction • identity negotiation • identity performanceidentity production • illumistream • individualism • Kansas State University • Lawrence LessigLibrary of Congress • LisaNova • LonelyGirl15 • MadV • Marshall McLuhanmedia culture • media ecology • mediascapemediated culturememeMichael Weschnetworked individualismnetworked production • new forms of community • new forms of expression • new forms of identity • new forms of interactionnew media • new types of conversation • new ways of engaging • new ways of relating to others • Numa Numa (video) • participant observationparticipatory mediaprinting press • re-taking identity • reappropriation • Regina Spektor • remix cultureremixingRobert Putnam • seriously playful participatory media culture • sharingsocial space • Soulja Boy (video) • telegraph • user-generated content • video communication • video lecturevideo sharingvlogweb applicationwebcamYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
12 OCTOBER 2013

The Designers Accord 2007-2012

"The Designers Accord was created in 2007 as a five–year project to mainstream sustainability in the global creative community. Formed as a distributed knowledge network of design firms, universities, and business leaders, the Designers Accord has helped advance the conversation around the ethics, practices, and responsibilities of the creative community.

The next phase of the Designers Accord will shift from community building to carrying out selective projects. The transition to project–based interventions reflects the current needs of our community, marketplace, and culture in engaging richly in the topic of sustainability."

Fig.1 infographic of the Designers Accord activities and progress from 2007–2012.

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TAGS

2007community buildingcreative communitydesign responsibility • Designers Accord • distributed knowledge network • ethical practices • global creative community • infographics • mainstream sustainability • project • project-based interventions • sustainability • sustainability principles • sustainability thinkingsustainable design • sustainable design standards • sustainable products

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 FEBRUARY 2004

Online Community Developers Shape Digital Landscapes

"Like twentieth–century architects and town planners, online community developers shape digital landscapes, but successful online communities also need a purpose, people and policies. In millions of online communities people meet to debate baseball scores, compare child–birth experiences, get information about stocks, and ask for consumer advice. People create communities by their presence or absence, their behavior and personalities, and so do moderators and others with special roles. Developers can't control what people do but they can influence them by defining purposes and policies. Designing software that is consistent, predictable, easy to learn and supports how people want to interact has an impact too. Supporting social interaction (i.e., sociability) and human–computer interaction (i.e., usability) can produce thriving online communities instead of electronic ghost towns. Many developers design software, thinking they are designing communities. Meanwhile, keen–eyed, reflective sociologists describe the emergence of communities. But communities are neither designed nor do they just emerge. Like physical communities they evolve and change over time."

(Jenny Preece)

Seminar on People, Computers, and Design, Stanford University October 13, 2000

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TAGS

2000 • communities emerge • communities in cyberspacecommunitycommunity buildingcommunity design • designing communities • developers • digital landscapes • electronic ghost town • electronic ghost towns • emerge • evolve and change over time • evolving cultureevolving experienceHCIHMIJenny Preecelandscapeonlineonline communities • online community developers • physical communities • policy • reflective sociologists • reflective sociology • reflexivitysociabilitysocial interactionsocial theory • the emergence of communities • twentieth centuryusability
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