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Which clippings match 'Medieval Art' keyword pg.1 of 1
22 NOVEMBER 2016

Wander through a Garden of Earthly Delights on loop

'Paradise' was commissioned by the MOTI Museum in The Netherlands for the exhibition New Delights, which is part of the Hieronymus Bosch 500-year anniversary. A gigantic video installation of this work is exhibited in the Museum until the 31st of December 2016.

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1490 • 20163D animation4K • 500 year anniversary • animated experience • animated interpretation • animated paintinganniversarycarnivalesquechickencoming to lifeconsumerismcontemporary interpretationcontinuous scenecreaturesdecadence • digitally recreated • Dutch animation • Dutch art • Dutch master • eroticismescapism • famous painting • hallucinatoryHello KittyHieronymus Boschlandscapelarge scale installationliving paintingliving picturesmedieval art • medieval painting • metaphors for our society • MOTI Museum • Netherlandspaintingpanoramic portrayalpenisselfishness • spybot • Studio Smack • synthetic fresco • The Garden of Earthly Delights • triptychvanityvideo installationvideo mural

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 NOVEMBER 2014

Edmund Burke on the sublime

"Some things that move us are beautiful, others are sublime. But the sublime moves us more profoundly than the beautiful. See how Edmund Burke tied the experience of the sublime to the possibility of pain and how the idea went on to influence the artistic Romanticism movement. Voiced by Harry Shearer. Scripted by Nigel Warburton."

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18th centuryaesthetic experienceaesthetic spectacleAge of Enlightenment • apprehension • aristocratic political norms • aristocratic social norms • artistic movementauthenticityawebeautifulChinoiserie • Counter-Enlightenment • Edmund Burke • emotion • European phenomenon • exhilarating experienceexoticexperience of the sublimefolk artfrightening • Harry Shearer • heroic individualism • historical inevitability • historiography • history of ideashorror • imagination to envision and to escape • individual imagination • industrial revolution • intense emotion • intuitionmedieval art • medievalism • musical impromptu • nationalism • natural epistemology of human activities • natural inevitability • natural sciencesnatureNigel Warburtonpicturesque • possibility of pain • representation of ideas • Rococo • romantic era • romantic notion of the artist • romantic period • romantic sublimeromanticism • scientific rationalisation of nature • spontaneity • Sturm und Drang • sublime • sublimity of untamed nature • terror • unfamiliar • urban sprawlvisual artsvisual spectacle

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 OCTOBER 2013

Filippo Brunelleschi's (re)discovery of Linear Perspective

"When Brunelleschi (re)discovered linear prespective circa 1420, Florentine painters and sculptors became obsessed with it, especially after detailed instructions were published in a painting manual written by a fellow Florentine, Leon Battista Alberti, in 1435. John Berger, an art historian, notes that the convention of perspective fits within Renaissance Humanism because 'it structured all images of reality to address a single spectator who, unlike God, could only be in one place at a time.' In other words, linear perspective eliminates the multiple viewpoints that we see in medieval art, and creates an illusion of space from a single, fixed viewpoint. This suggests a renewed focus on the individual viewer, and we know that individualism is an important part of the Humanism of the Renaissance."

(Beth Harris and Steven Zucker, Smarthistory)

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1420 • 3D spaceAncient Greeceart historyEuropean Renaissance • Filippo Brunelleschi • fixed viewpoint • Florence • Giotto di Bondone • Greece • horizon line • illusionistic spaceindividualismJohn BergerKhan AcademyLeon Battista Alberti • linear perspective • mathesismedievalmedieval artmultiple viewpointsperspective viewrediscovered • Renaissance Humanism • Rene Descartessingle perspective point of view • Smarthistory (site) • vanishing point • viewpointvisual illusionvisual perspective • volumetric

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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