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Which clippings match 'Visual Symbolism' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 OCTOBER 2013

Decoding BMW's You Know You Are Not The First

"The young woman's flawless skin is emphasizing the societal view of how perfection is what is considered beautiful and ideal. Her skin doesn't have a single blemish bruise, bump, or scar on it. Her makeup is very subtle and her cheeks have a slight rosy glow to them, giving her a very youthful appearance. The lack of jewelry is also making her look younger and more innocent and it is putting the focus solely on her bare flawless skin, this flawlessness is likely representing what one would get if they purchase one of their premium selection used BMW's, spotlessness in paint and interior.

Although BMW engages this image of innocence and flawlessness, there also appears to be a significant sexual message in this ad because the initial 'Innocent' image dissolves as you skim down the ad and see how the young woman's eye contact is directly with the camera, and it looks as if she is looking right into your eyes with a seductive expression. Her mouth also get a lot of attention as it appears to be slightly open, drawing your attention right to her full lips, 'open lips are used to suggest sexual excitement or passion'"

(Sonia Sidhu, 10 June 2012)

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TAGS

2008advertising campaignArthur Berger • atypical • blondeBMWbranded commodities • car company • constructed meaningcultural normsdepictions of womeneye contact • flawlessness • Germanglobalisation of aspirationGreece • hair colour • innocenceinterpretation • media analysis • media criticismmedia textmouth • olive skin • paradigmatic analysis • partially unclothedperfection • print advertisement • seduction • semiotic approach • semioticssex objectsexual agency • sexual excitement • signification • skin tone • suggestive narratives • syntagmatic analysis • textual analysis • used car • virginity • visual symbolism • young woman • young women

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 NOVEMBER 2011

Jonathan Meades: Reading Stowe Gardens

"Stowe Park, a story filled with stories, is, says Meades, 'an anthology of boasts.' Take, for example, the temples of Ancient Virtues, British Worthies and Modern Virtues. Set in the Elysian Fields, reflected in the waters of the River Styx, they are Cobham's version of the good, the great and the downright bad: old heroes in the first, modern heroes in the second and everything that is rubbish about eighteenth century today signifed by the ruins of the third, and by a headless statue of none other than his arch enemy, Walpole. It is a big old Whig boast, and hilariously obvious. Obvious, that is, if you're a member of the Kit Cat Club , or someone with enough of a reading in the classics, in British history, in Cobhams Machiovelian shenanigons. Otherwise, like most of us, you'll be needing that there guide book."

(26 October 2011, FreeState)

Abroad Again: Season 1, Episode 5, Stowe: Reading a Garden (6 June 2007) [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1180365/].

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TAGS

18th century2007 • architectural folly • aristocracyboasting • classical ideals • classical virtues • decorationdesign formalism • enclosed world • English garden • English landscape garden • English landscape movement • English landscape park • Enlightenment landscapes • European Enlightenment • follies • formal design • gardengarden design • garden follies • garden ornaments • gardening style • ha-ha • ha-ha wall • historical era • historical recreationidealismidyl • idyllic pastoral landscape • James Gibbs • Jardin anglais • John Soane • John Vanbrugh • Jonathan Meades • landscape architect • landscape architecture • landscape garden • ornamental design • pastoral landscape • picturesque • picturesque architecture • planting • reading a garden • Reading A Garden (2007) • Robert Adam • Robert Payton • Stowe Gardens • Stowe House • Stowe School • sublimesymmetrical patterntelevision documentarytheme parkUKview of naturevisual symbolism • Whigs • William Kent

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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