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Which clippings match 'British' keyword pg.1 of 2
07 NOVEMBER 2013

The Strange Death of Ordinary Language Philosophy

Ordinary Language Philosophy (OLP) "was identified mainly with British analytic philosophers of the last mid–century and more specifically those at the University of Oxford. Its chief practitioners were regarded to be such philosophers as Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889–1951), Gilbert Ryle (1900–1976), J. L. Austin (1911–1960), P. F. Strawson (1919–), Paul Grice (1913–1988) and John Wisdom (1904–1993). From the late 1940s to the early 1960s OLP was an integral part of the mainstream of analytic philosophy; as Stephen Mulhall (1994: 444) has pointed out, when a leading introductory textbook of the era spoke simply of 'contemporary philosophy,' it was OLP that was being referred to. Currently, however, OLP is not generally viewed as a legitimate intellectual option for philosophers, analytic or otherwise. In fact it's safe to say that, with the possible exception of Bergson's and Driesch's vitalism, OLP is the most deeply unfashionable of all the main currents of twentieth–century Western philosophy. It has fallen victim to what Stan Godlovitch has called philosophy's equivalent of 're–touching family photos, old Kremlin–style' (2000: 6)."

(Tommi Uschanov, April 2001)

TAGS

20th century • analytic philosophy • British • contemporary philosophy • erasure • Gilbert Ryle • Hans Driesch • Henri Bergsonhistory of ideasintellectual history • John Austin • John Wisdom • languagelegitimate knowledge • legitimate scholarly texts • legitimationlinguistic philosophyLudwig Wittgensteinmid-century • ordinary language philosophy • Oxford analysis • Paul Grice • Peter Strawson • philosophy • sociology of knowledge • Stan Godlovitch • Stephen Mulhall • unfashionable • University of OxfordWestern philosophy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 AUGUST 2012

Alfred Hitchcock interviewed by Tom Snyder in 1973

"Long thought to be lost or destroyed a complete recording has been found of one of the few hour long interviews of Alfred Hitchcock . Originally broadcast as one of the first Tomorrow Shows with Tom Snyder in the Fall of 1973. This recording is from a second repeat of this show broadcast on Memorial day, 1980.

The VHS (SP) tape itself was found to be in excellent condition. While properly stored in a climate controlled environment it apparently had not been played in decades. Great care has been taken to make the digital transfer."

Uploaded by "willg550187415" on 8 Oct 2009

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1973Alfred Hitchcockblack humourBritishBritish directorBritish film director • cameo appearance • chat show • cinemacinema historycinema pioneerfamous peoplefamous personalitiesfilmfilm directorhistorical figureshistory of cinemainnovatorinterview • lost tapes • pioneerpractitioner interview • suspense • talk show • television interview • Tom Snyder • Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder • TVVHS

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JANUARY 2012

Oramics to Electronica: Revealing Histories of Electronic Music

"The story of Electronic Music, from the sound experiments of the 1950s through the digital revolution to today, is one of invention and innovation. Developed with a team of electronic musicians, our exhibition charts this history with examples of music making technology spanning more than 50 years. ...

The story begins with the BBC Radiophonic Workshop and Electronic Music Studios (EMS), two organisations that broke musical boundaries in the postwar years. Objects from this era include the EMS VCS3, the first portable synthesiser.

Also on display is the Oramics Machine, a revolutionary music synthesiser that was created in the 1960s by Daphne Oram, founder of the Radiophonic Workshop. Daphne created this visionary machine that could transform drawings into sound, and it was recently acquired by the Science Museum in co–operation with Goldsmiths, University of London."

(The Science Museum, 2011)

Fig.1 "Oramics to Electronica", Directed, Produced, Filmed and Edited by Jen Fearnley & Nick Street, Commissioned by The Science Museum, London.

Fig.2 "Daphne Oram", Mick Grierson, Director of Creative Computing at Goldsmiths, University of London, and Director of the Daphne Oram collection.

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TAGS

1950s1960s • Acid House • BBC Radiophonic WorkshopBritish • creative computing • creativityDaphne Oramdevicedigital pioneersdigital revolution • drawings into sound • electronic music • Electronic Music Studios • electronic musician • EMS • EMS VCS3 • engineerexhibition • Fairlight Computer Musical Instrument • futuristicGoldsmiths College (University of London)historyinnovationinventionmachine • Mick Grierson • musicmusic making technology • music synthesiser • musician • Oramics Machine • Oramics to Electronica • pioneering • portable synthesiser • postwar • Public History Project • Radiophonic Workshop • revolutionary • science and technologyScience Museum of Londonsound experiments • Speak and Spell • synthesiser • synthesizer • TB303 • TB303 bass synthesizer • technologytoyUKwomen in music

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 DECEMBER 2011

Guardian rehires 'Skinhead' agency

"BMP [Boase Massimi Pollitt] was the Guardian's advertising agency in the mid–80s, when it created one of the most famous British adverts of all time for the newspaper.

The 1986 commercial featured a skinhead who appeared to be wrestling a man's briefcase from his hands. But the camera then cuts and viewers see that he is in fact trying to rescue the man from falling bricks.

'We had some inspirational pitches over the last few weeks but BMP's work really stood out,' said Marc Sands, Guardian Newspapers marketing director.

'Their intuitive understanding of our brands and the demands placed upon them was impressive. We look forward to some fantastic work springing from a genuine partnership.'

BMP will create advertising for the Guardian Unlimited websites as well as for the Guardian newspaper."

(Claire Cozens, 21 December 2000)

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1980s1986advertisingadvertising agency • BMP (advertising agency) • Boase Massimi Pollitt • briefcase • Britishcamera anglefalsehood of images • Guardian Newspapers • Guardian Unlimitedperspectivepoint of viewskinheadThe GuardianThe Whole Picturetruth of perceptiontv adwhole is greater than the sum of the parts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MARCH 2011

Sylvia Anderson on the fashion of the 1970's TV Series UFO

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19701970s70s televisionaction-adventure • APF • BritishBritish television • Captain Scarlet • Century 21 Productions • childrens televisioncostume designcult television • Dolores Mantez • Doppelganger (1969) • Ed Bishop • futuristicfuturistic designfuturistic visionGabrielle Drake • Gerry Anderson • groovyinterior stylinginterview • ITC Entertainment • Journey to the Far Side of the Sun • live-action • live-action television • Michael Billington • practitioner interviewsci-fiscience fictionscience fiction seriesscience fiction television seriesset decorset designspace agespace age lookspace explorationspace shipspace suitspace travelspecial effects • Stingray • Sylvia Anderson • synthetic fibre • The Mysterons • ThunderbirdsTV seriesUFO • UFO (TV Series) • women designerswomen in film

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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