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Which clippings match 'Colour Theory' keyword pg.1 of 1
08 AUGUST 2014

Colour in Context: Revisiting Albers, with Anoka Faruqee

"At the Yale Presidential Inauguration Symposia on October 12th 2013, Anoka Faruqee, Associate Professor of Painting/Printmaking at Yale University, presented a lecture entitled, "Color in Context: Revisiting Albers".

In 1963, Josef Albers published his masterwork, Interaction of Color via Yale University Press, as a limited silkscreen edition. Fifty years later, the original volume and its various descendants continue to enlighten and delight art students, instructors, designers, and artists. This seminar will consider the publication's pragmatic and philosophical relevance to our present moment.

(Published on 29 Oct 2013)

Josef Albers (2006). "Interaction of Color", Yale University Press.

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1963afterimage • Anoka Faruqee • artistBauhaus School • Black Mountain College • colour • colour chart • colour in context • colour spacecolour studiescolour theory • colour wheel • cut paper • cut-outdesign formalismgeometric abstraction • Interaction of Color (1963) • iPad AppJosef Albersmodernist aesthetics • pigment mixing • RGBrule-based workvisual abstractionYale University • Yale University Press

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JULY 2014

Diagram for the structure of teaching at the Bauhaus / Schema zum Aufbau der Lehre am Bauhaus

"The individual elements of the Bauhaus teachings are inscribed in a circular shape. The areas of the preliminary course and building are conspicuously delineated from the core of the instruction–the workshops with their accompanying subjects–by a drawn double ring. This is due to the special position that both of these teaching areas occupied: In order to even be accepted to the study programme at the Bauhaus, it was necessary to successfully complete the preliminary course. And only the most talented students could qualify for participation in the building theory course. The schema also indicates the length of the respective educational units."

Fig.1 Walter Gropius, Schema zum Aufbau der Lehre am Bauhaus, 1922, veröffentlicht in: Staatliches Bauhaus Weimar, 1919–1923 Bauhaus–Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung, Berlin.

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1922apprenticeshipart and design educationatelier methodBauhaus DessauBauhaus SchoolBauhaus WeimarBauhaus-KolloquiumBerlin • circular disk • colour theorycourse modulescraft and designcurricula designcurriculumcurriculum designdesign and makingdesign curriculumdesign educationdesign formalismdesign school • design workshops • hierarchical model • learning and teachinglearning through practicematerial experimentationmaterial interventionsmaterial practice • Museum fur Gestaltung • programme modulesschema • Schema zum Aufbau der Lehre am Bauhaus • Staatliches Bauhaus • studio approachstudio coursestudio practice • study programme • Walter Gropiusworkshops

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 OCTOBER 2013

Meredith Davis: A Call to Action for Design Educators

"I believe that design education, at the most fundamental level, views complexity as a problem to be overcome through reductivist artifacts, not as an inevitable and pervasive attribute of life in the post–industrial community. So if the future is about an ever–expanding web of connectedness, how are we preparing students for meaningful work in this complex world? I'd like to suggest that we're not. Despite the obvious emotional impact of Glaser's poster, he belongs to a generation in which the goal of design was to make things simple. Negroponte, on the other hand, is a technologist for whom the design goal is to render the complex manageable and to make complicated things meaningful.

Almost everything about today's graphic design education is matched to Glaser's worldview. We structure both curricula and projects in craft–based progressions from simple to complex, from the abstract to the contextualized. In typography classes, for example, we begin with the letter, and then advance to the word, sentence, paragraph, and page. Sequences of typography courses are built on this simple to complex progression, when opening InDesign demands that students address the formal and interpretive issues of publication design simultaneously; how do you defer a discussion of leading, of column width, of the modernist preconceptions of software, of language? The only option is default, and what kind of typographic lesson is that?

The reality is that our strategy for teaching typography is residue from how students could comp type in predigital times; by drawing. It is the organizational structure for every type book since James Craig's 1970 Designing with Type, but it holds less relevance for what students need to know about communication in a digital world. Typography today is a complex relational system that depends on the interplay of formal, technological, linguistic, and cultural variables. Yet we persist in teaching this progression of scale, isolating such variables within their own distinct conceptual frameworks and rules.

The same strategy exists for how students progress in other studies of form. Foundation lessons begin with abstraction: point, line, and plane; color wheels; and paper–folding exercises. We defer discussions of meaning and context until later levels of the curriculum and beginning students learn these abstraction principles only through patterns in what makes their teachers smile. Nothing about these studies resembles what students know about in the real world, and as a colleague recently suggested, what the clients of design see in our work. So what if we begin with the familiar and complex?"

(Meredith Davis, 4 April 2008, AIGA Boston Presentation)

Presentation made at W/Here: Contesting Knowledge in the 21st Century, Emily Carr University of Art+Design, Vancouver, Canada, 7–9 December 2011.

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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