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Which clippings match 'Embroidered Textiles' keyword pg.1 of 1
25 JANUARY 2015

Soundweaving: playing traditional Hungarian folk embroidery

"At the core of the Soundweaving project is the traditional cross–stitching pattern used in Hungarian folk embroidery transformed into sound by a punch card comb music player. The cross–stitch pattern of holes on the tape in the musical box were punched by the creator, Zsanett Szirmay.

In this case, the punched tape acts as the score. Embroidered shirts and pillows from the Transylvanian Bukovina, and from Kalotaszeg and Hungary served as a basis for the patterns. As part of the transformation, embroidery patterns turned into laser cut textile pieces, and cross–stitched patterns into melodies. Soundweaving equally stimulates all senses, and calls for interaction. The project uses multiple media and communicates on diverse planes, combining the borderlands of folk art, design and music. It belongs to the analogue and digital realms at the same time as the handmade embroidery is translated into laser cut patterns. At the same time, the visual world is presented in audio, or rather the graphic aspect of music gets a role in developing the tunes. Bálint Tárkány–Kovács, folk musician and composer was instrumental in the audio mapping and developing the tunes."

(Rita Mária Halasi, Moholy–Nagy Művészeti Egyetem, 2014)

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TAGS

2014analogue correspondence • Balint Tarkany-Kovacs • Bucovina • Carpathians • computational aesthetics • cross-stitch pattern • design and music • design student projectembroidered patternsembroidered textiles • embroidery pattern • folk decoration • handicraft • handmade embroidery • Hungarian folk embroidery • Hungary • Kalotaszeg • laser cut patterns • laser cut textile pieces • listening to imagesMA Textile Design • melodies • Moholy-Nagy Muveszeti Egyetem • music boxmusic player • musical box • musical scoreprogrammable device • punch card comb • punch cardspunched-card systemsequencer • Soundweaving project • traditional crafts • traditional handicrafts • Transylvania • Transylvanian Bukovina • Ukrainevisual pattern • weaving pattern • Zsanett Szirmay

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 SEPTEMBER 2013

Handmade in Britain: The Story of Wallpaper

"In the second programme in the series, presenter Paul Martin reveals the secret history of wallpaper from the 17th century to the present day.

The film explores how wallpaper, seemingly so fragile and easy to replace, provides a vital index of changing tastes in the home. The programme shows how from its earliest days wallpaper imitated other, more costly wall coverings: from the 17th–century papers that were designed to look like embroidered textiles to 18th–century flocked wallpapers. The latter, intended as a cheaper substitute for costly damasks or velvets, became a triumph of British innovation, coming to grace the grandest of state apartments and country house interiors.

Focussing on how wallpaper was actually made, the programme goes onto explore how it became one of the battlefields in discussions about design in the 19th century. For, although technological innovations in machine printing had allowed manufacturers to print elaborate designs with complex colour–ways, some commentators were shocked by the poor aesthetic quality of British wallpapers. The programme looks at how designers and reformers attempted to take the situation in hand: from 'The False Principles of Design', an exhibition organised by Sir Henry Cole, the first Director of the Victoria and Albert Museum, which sought to instruct the British public in good and bad design; to the pioneering work of Augustus Pugin and William Morris.

Finally, the film traces the fortunes of wallpaper in the 20th century. Patterned walls faced stiff competition from the purity of plain, painted or whitewashed walls, as advocated by modernists like Le Corbusier. However, new techniques, like screen–printing, allowed shorter runs of innovate wallpapers, which were aimed at architects and interior designers. And, as Paul Martin discovers, wallpaper is still flourishing at the beginning of the 21st century. A combination of digital printing, screen–printing and hand–printing allows companies, like Timorous Beasties, to produce exciting new designs.

Presented by Paul Martin, contributors include Christine Woods, Anthony Wells–Cole, Martha Armitage, Allyson McDermott and Paul Simmons (Timorous Beasties), as well as V&A experts."

First broadcast on 25 September 2013 on BBC Four as part of the Handmade in Britain series [http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03bm1rg].

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TAGS

16th century17th century18th century19th century20th century21st century • Allyson McDermott • Anthony Wells-Cole • antiqueart and craftsArts and Crafts Movement • Augustus Pugin • bad design • BBC Four • changing tastes • Christine Woods • colourways • damask • deluxe item • design craftdigital printingdomestic material object • elaborate designs • embroidered textiles • flock wallpaper • good design • hand-printing • Handmade in Britain (series) • Henry Cole • industrial grime • interior design • interior designer • interior stylingLe Corbusierluxury • machine printing • makersmanufacturing technology • Marthe Armitage • Palladio Wallpapers • pattern • Paul Martin • Paul Simmons • poisonprinting processscreenprinting • stately homes • technological innovation • The False Principles of Design • Timorous Beasties • two-up-two-down • velvetVictoria and Albert Museum • wall coverings • wallpaperwallpaper design • wallpapering • William Morris

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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