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Which clippings match 'Shopping Centre' keyword pg.1 of 1
01 FEBRUARY 2015

Interactive installation created by Brother System for the Centre Commercial Les Rives de l'Orne launch 2013

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TAGS

2013balls • Brother System • Caen • circledigital screens • digital studio • edge detection • edge findingexperience designinteractive digital displayinteractive displayinteractive installationinteractive screeninteractive visualisationKinect for Xbox 360 • outlines • participative mediaparticle systemsProcessing (software)public spacereactive graphics • reactive interactive work • real-time interactivity • Sept de Trefle • shopping centresilhouette • Yann Rayon

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 JANUARY 2015

Melbourne youth subculture: before punk there were Sharpies

"An extension of the UK skinhead movement, the roots of sharp lie in the influx of European immigrants in Australia in the early 1960s. By the late 1960s the Sharpie subculture had evolved and existed in the mainly working class and migrant inner city suburbs such as Richmond, Fitzroy, Collingwood and Brunswick where Greeks, Italians, Yogoslavs and English immigrants all lived side by side. But as street corners gradually changed to shopping centres, by the early 1970s, the Sharpie movement started to spread to the outer suburbs of Melbourne where a 'rough as guts' working class ethos existed.

The name 'Sharpie' originated from the fashion. It was all about the clothes and looking sharp, and flash. The first wave of Sharpies from 1966 – 1969 were strongly influenced by UK Mod fashions, the 1964 Rockers and the style of certain Italian migrants. Demeanor was tough, hair was short back and sides and clothing was custom made by European tailors, thus allowing for a blend of neo–thirties suave combined with a contemporary larrikin attitude. Dances were also a big part of the Sharpies social fabric, with bands such as Billy Thorpe & the Aztecs, Wild Cherries, Ray Brown & the Whispers, and Max Merritt & the Meteors being popular choices.

From 1970–1980, the second wave of Sharpies were following hard, tough rock'n'roll bands like Lobby Loyde and the Coloured Balls, Buster Brown, Rose Tattoo, The Angels and ACDC. Sharpies were now often congregating in large numbers, regularly attending live band concerts at town hall and high school dances as well as early discos. But due to their sheer numbers, Sharpies were often perceived as being untouchable by the police and were often associated with excessive violence, regularly taking part in fights."

(Melynda von Wayward)

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1960s1970s • ACDC (band) • Australiabelonging • Billy Thorpe and the Aztecs (band) • British Australian • Brunswick (Victoria) • Buster Brown (band) • Carol Jerrems • clothesclothing fashion • Collingwood (Victoria) • Coloured Balls (band) • counterculturecultural codescustom madedisaffected youth • disco • European immigrants • European style • excessive violence • Fitzroy (Victoria) • Greek Australian • Heidelberg Technical College • high school dance • identity performanceinner city • inner city suburbs • Italian Australian • Italian immigrant • larrikin • larrikin attitude • Lobby Loyde (band) • looking sharp • Max Merritt and the Meteors (band) • Melbourne • Melynda von Wayward • mod fashionmullet • outer suburbs • protopunk • punk rockpunk rock ethos • Ray Brown and the Whispers (band) • Richmond (Victoria) • rock n roll • rockers • Rose Tattoo (band) • rough as guts • sharpie movement • sharpie subculture • sharpies • shopping centre • sideburns • skinheadsocial fabricstyle • suave • subculture • The Angels (band) • town hallurban clothingVictoria (Australia) • Wild Cherries (band) • working classworking class culture • working class ethos • youth cultureyouth subculture • Yugoslav

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 SEPTEMBER 2013

Robert Peston Goes Shopping: shopping and the high street retailer

"In this new three–part BBC Two series, Robert Peston tells the colourful story of shopping in Britain since the Second World War. Using rarely seen archive and interviews with the key players of British retail, Peston explores how shopping has changed–and how it's changed us.

He tells the story behind some of our favourite high street stores, including Marks and Spencer, Sainsbury's and Tesco. He explains how we fell in love with shopping, but allowed the love affair to become too passionate, so much so that many of us ended up in chronic debt. And he shows how retail is now in the grips of a revolution as it attempts to come to terms with the rise of online shopping and the fallout of the financial crisis.

In the first episode, Seduction, Robert Peston tells how shopping in Britain was transformed from a chore to be endured into our favourite pastime. In the years of austerity and rationing after the Second World War, shopping was drab. There were long queues, yet there was little to buy.

But in the economic boom of the 1950s, consumerism took off. Marks and Spencer led the way with a mix of quality, value and customer service. From America came self–service supermarkets, which changed the way we shop. Then came out–of–town superstores–one–stop shops which fed the need for convenience as car ownership and the numbers of working women rose in the 1960s.

Clever retailers learned to adapt to cater for the new markets of the Sixties, Seventies and Eighties fashion boutiques: Chelsea Girl, for instance, catered for the emerging teenage market, while the career woman was served by Next.

By the 1980s, shopping had been transformed into a leisure activity–a fundamental shift confirmed by the opening of Britain's first large out–of–town shopping mall in 1986. Gateshead's MetroCentre was more than just a shopping centre–it was a leisure complex complete with restaurants, cinema, and even a fun fair. Shopping was king."

(BBC Media Centre)

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1950s1960s1980sASOSausterityBBC Two • car ownership • click and collect • consumerismconvenience • David Sainsbury • Dixonseconomic boomfinancial crisis • George Davies • high street shops • high street stores • Jane Snowball • leisure activity • leisure complex • m-commerceMarks and Spencer • Michael Aldrich • Mrs Snowball • multi-channel retailing • Next Retail Ltd • one-stop shops • online shopping • out-of-town • out-of-town superstores • pawnbroker • payday loan lender • rationing • retail historyretail storeretailers • Robert Peston • Robert Peston Goes Shopping (2013) • Sainsburys • self-service supermarket • shoppingshopping behaviourshopping centreshopping mallsocial shopping • Stanley Kalms • superstore • Teleputer • TescoUK • working women

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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