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Which clippings match 'Making Process' keyword pg.1 of 1
12 JULY 2015

Longitudinal and ipsative assessment

"Ipsative assessment and feedback (assessment and feedback based on comparison with previous performance) describes an approach to assessment that focuses on improvement against past performance rather than grading against set criteria. Commonly used in performance-related disciplines such as music or sport, ipsative assessment enables credit to be given for improvement regardless of achievement (Hughes, Okumoto and Crawford, 2010). Ipsative feedback in turn makes comments on how far the student has travelled from a previous level of performance, which is both more motivational for non-traditional learners and more likely to promote self-regulation in all students.

In a wide range of assessment scenarios, from professional practice (medicine for example) to distance learning, ipsative assessment and feedback could reduce the need for testing and retesting of skills. Instead of 'learning for the test', a process of continuous monitoring and self-regulation could make the acquisition of professional or vocational competences more authentic, rewarding and genuine, and enable tutors to devote more time and effort to mentoring."

(Marianne Sheppard and Ros Smith, http://jiscdesignstudio.pbworks.com)

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assessment for learning • assessment scenarios • assessment techniquescomparison with previous performancecontinuous monitoring • continuous personal development • diagnostic assessment • Gwyneth Hugheshow far the student has travelledimprovement against past performanceipsative assessment • ipsative assessment and feedback • ipsative feedback • JISC Design Studio • Kaori Okumoto • knowledge and skills acquisition • learning and successlearning engagement • learning for the test • level of performance • Likert scale • longitudinal learning datamaking processmeasuring individual performancemeasuring instrument • Megan Crawford • motivational needs • non-traditional learners • performance-related disciplines • personal achievementpersonal bestpersonal improvement • professional competences • professional practicequality of achievementrunning score • self-regulation • student achievementstudent performance • vocational competences

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MARCH 2015

Joep Frens: To Make is to Grasp

"Joep Frens, Designer/Researcher and Assistant Professor in the 'Designing Quality in Interaction' group at Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands. Joep's work explores how to design for (growing) systems and the power of 'making' as a physical way of thinking. He takes a 'hands-on' approach to design based in the research-through-design method and regularly gives workshops on cardboard modeling.

Joep is a designer/researcher from the Netherlands. He holds a master degree in Industrial Design Engineering from Delft University of Technology and a doctoral degree from Eindhoven University of Technology on a thesis called: 'Designing for Rich Interaction: Integrating Form, Interaction, and Function' (2006). Currently he is assistant professor in the 'Designing Quality in Interaction' group at the same university. He teaches several courses at bachelor and master level and supervises several PhD students.

In his teaching and research Joep tries to bring together two of his fascinations: the question of how to design for (growing) systems and the power of making as a physical way of thinking. He takes a hands-on approach and is well versed in the research-through-design method. He regularly gives workshops on cardboard modeling and runs a website around the technique.

Before his doctoral research he spent a year at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich (ETH), and after he has been invited to teach and lecture in the USA (CMU), Germany (HFGSG, FHD), South-Korea (KAIST), China (Tsinghua University, Jiangnan university), Belgium (UA) and at several universities in the Netherlands.

Joep's lecture occurred Wednesday, October 1st at 5:00pm in MMCH A14."

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2014 • action based paradigm • aesthetic experience • aesthetic interaction • camera • cardboard modelling • Carnegie Mellon Universitycognitive skillsconcept camera • David Menting • Delft University of Technologydesign conceptDesign the Future Lecture Programme • designing for growing systems • designing for interaction • designing for rich interaction • designing for systems • ecological psychology • Eindhoven University of Technology • embodied interaction • expressivity • expressivity of form • feel thingsform and function • form and use • future interfaces • grasp • handlehaptic interfaceHCIhuman capabilitiesindustrial designinteraction styles • Joep Elderman • Joep Frens • Jordy Rooijakkers • Josje Wijnen • Kacper Holenderski • Ken Giang • Lukas Van Campenhout • making as a physical way of thinking • making processmodular design • multi-specific products • Netherlands • Nierenberg Chair of Design • on-screen menus • our tools talk to usphysical modelsphysical objectspliability • proceduralisation • product design • research-through-design method • rich interaction • standardisation interaction styles • systemic design • tactile richnesstechnology affordances • Tom Frissen

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 NOVEMBER 2014

The Notebook: A Place for Thinking

Filmed at Irish Museum of Modern Art, Ireland. "Notebook Material" Des Ward Student artwork in notebooks – 1st year groups on the IADT BA Art programme: 2009 – 2014.

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2014 • a place for thinking • art and design practiceattunementbookcommonplace bookcommonplaces • Des Ward • discernment • drawingdrawing as enquirydrawing ideasdrawing on paperdrawing studiesDun Laoghaire Institute of Art • experimental speculation • experimental thinkingfirst year art and design • IADT BA Art • idea generationideas start on paper • Irish Museum of Modern Art • making processmark makingnotebook • physical experimentation • place metaphor • poetics of creative research • poetics of thinking • poetics of thought • Republic of Ireland • Seamus Heaney • sketch-thinkingsketchbooksketching ideas • skilled practice • thinking places • thinking processthinking through drawingthinking toolstracesvisual problem-solving

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 SEPTEMBER 2013

How to deal with the demands of the rapidly evolving new technology and yet further the aesthetics of our filmic art?

"With digital capture and even digital intermediates, it becomes very easy to think of the image in the simplest of terms: contrast, saturation and color bias. But I think too often we forget about texture and sharpness. Film has organic grain texture that simply doesn't exist in digital cinematography. I'm not a film 'purist' but I think it's safe to say that with the advent of radical advances in digital cinema technology there has been a certain homogenization of the cinematographic image in regard to look and texture. It is common to shoot for an evenly distributed rich digital negative (protect the highlights, see into the shadows) with plenty of sharpness to endure the color correction suite and create the look in post. Everybody shoots the sensor the same way.

Painting is a great influence on me. Whenever I can I go to museums and look at the classics, the Dutch masters, Rembrandt and Georges de la Tour. Looking at these old paintings can be inspiring. These are the basics for cameramen because we can learn lighting from them. We can study the classic paintings and try to use that technique of lighting in our photography. I have lots of picture books at home–photography books and art books. When we did McCabe and Mrs. Miller, I showed a book of Andrew Wyeth's paintings to Bob Altman and said, 'What do you think of these faded, soft, pastel images?' And he liked it. Then I took the same book to the lab and explained to them that this was what we were aiming for. They understood right away why we were flashing the film. So it helps; a picture is worth ten thousand words. A picture can immediately tell you your feelings about something.

With digital capture, we have been given a completely different set of tools, trading physical lab processes for computer–driven non–destructive techniques, creating possibilities for the image to be pushed any way we wish in post. In a time when film is disappearing fast and digital is making progress in image quality improvement, it has become important for cinematographers to master these new tools."

(Vilmos Zsigmond ASC HSC, IMAGO European Federation of Cinematographers)

TAGS

aesthetics • American Society of Cinematgraphers (ASC) • Andrew Wyeth • ARRI Alexas • art of colour • available lightcamera technologycinematographycolour • colour bias • colour correctioncolour saturation • colourist • computer-driven techniques • digital capturedigital cinema technologydigital cinematography • digital intermediates • digital negativedigital picturesdigital progressdigital technology • European Federation of Cinematographers • faded images • film grain • film grain texture • film lighting • filmic art • filmmaking • Georges de La Tour • GoProimage contrast • image highlights • image manipulation • image quality • image shadows • image sharpness • image tone • IMAGO European Federation of Cinematographers • iPhone cinematographyKodak Eastman • lab process • light exposure • look and texture • low lightmaking process • McCabe and Mrs Miller (1971) • mobile video productionnew technology • non-destructive techniques • organic grain texture • painting with light • pastel colours • post-productionpre-productionrapid technological changeRED ONERembrandt van Rijn • retraining • Robert Altman • soft image quality • Sony camerataste (sociology) • taste cultivation • taste formations • Vilmos Zsigmond • visual compositionvisual representation • visual richness • visual sensibilityvisual storytelling • visual texture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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