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Which clippings match 'Film Grain' keyword pg.1 of 1
16 SEPTEMBER 2013

How to deal with the demands of the rapidly evolving new technology and yet further the aesthetics of our filmic art?

"With digital capture and even digital intermediates, it becomes very easy to think of the image in the simplest of terms: contrast, saturation and color bias. But I think too often we forget about texture and sharpness. Film has organic grain texture that simply doesn't exist in digital cinematography. I'm not a film 'purist' but I think it's safe to say that with the advent of radical advances in digital cinema technology there has been a certain homogenization of the cinematographic image in regard to look and texture. It is common to shoot for an evenly distributed rich digital negative (protect the highlights, see into the shadows) with plenty of sharpness to endure the color correction suite and create the look in post. Everybody shoots the sensor the same way.

Painting is a great influence on me. Whenever I can I go to museums and look at the classics, the Dutch masters, Rembrandt and Georges de la Tour. Looking at these old paintings can be inspiring. These are the basics for cameramen because we can learn lighting from them. We can study the classic paintings and try to use that technique of lighting in our photography. I have lots of picture books at home–photography books and art books. When we did McCabe and Mrs. Miller, I showed a book of Andrew Wyeth's paintings to Bob Altman and said, 'What do you think of these faded, soft, pastel images?' And he liked it. Then I took the same book to the lab and explained to them that this was what we were aiming for. They understood right away why we were flashing the film. So it helps; a picture is worth ten thousand words. A picture can immediately tell you your feelings about something.

With digital capture, we have been given a completely different set of tools, trading physical lab processes for computer–driven non–destructive techniques, creating possibilities for the image to be pushed any way we wish in post. In a time when film is disappearing fast and digital is making progress in image quality improvement, it has become important for cinematographers to master these new tools."

(Vilmos Zsigmond ASC HSC, IMAGO European Federation of Cinematographers)

TAGS

aesthetics • American Society of Cinematgraphers (ASC) • Andrew Wyeth • ARRI Alexas • art of colour • available lightcamera technologycinematographycolour • colour bias • colour correctioncolour saturation • colourist • computer-driven techniques • digital capturedigital cinema technologydigital cinematography • digital intermediates • digital negativedigital picturesdigital progressdigital technology • European Federation of Cinematographers • faded images • film grain • film grain texture • film lighting • filmic art • filmmaking • Georges de La Tour • GoProimage contrast • image highlights • image manipulation • image quality • image shadows • image sharpness • image tone • IMAGO European Federation of Cinematographers • iPhone cinematographyKodak Eastman • lab process • light exposure • look and texture • low lightmaking process • McCabe and Mrs Miller (1971) • mobile video productionnew technology • non-destructive techniques • organic grain texture • painting with light • pastel colours • post-productionpre-productionrapid technological changeRED ONERembrandt van Rijn • retraining • Robert Altman • soft image quality • Sony camerataste (sociology) • taste cultivation • taste formations • Vilmos Zsigmond • visual compositionvisual representation • visual richness • visual sensibilityvisual storytelling • visual texture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 APRIL 2011

Onscreen discussion of the ontology of the photographic image

"The film commences with a fast moving introduction to the very stylish world of a hot fashion photographer, Thomas, played by that emblematic '60s actor, David Hemmings. This is the world made notorious by magazines like Tatler and Queen as well as all the tabloids of the world, all Pucci fashion, dolly birds (Jane Birkin made her name in this film), drugs, fast cars and rock–and–roll. ...

Throughout Blow Out and Blowup there is always a sense in which recording media themselves are seen as, somehow, treacherous. Antonioni's Blowup forcefully reminds us that even the latest technologies can mislead or betray us. In the computer age, it this remaining element of ontological uncertainty that still troubles the human observer–for we are not, quite yet, masters of information"

(Jonathan Dawson, February 2005, Senses of Cinema)

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TAGS

1960s1966 • Blow Out (1981) • Blow-Up (1966) • Carlo Ponti • casual sexcontextcoolcountercultureDavid Bailey • David Hemmings • diegetic sound • Edward Bond • fashionfashion modelfashion photographerfashion photography • fashion shoot • feature filmfilm grainHerbie Hancockhuman perception • Jane Birkin • John Castle • Julio Cortazar • layeringLondonmake-upMichelangelo Antonionimod fashionmurderobscured view • ontology of the photographic image • photographphotographer • photographers studio • photographic blow-upsphotographic image • Sarah Miles • Senses of Cinema (journal)sixtiessixties cool • swinging sixties • The Yardbirds • Tonino Guerra • transparency • transparent layers • truth of perception • Tsai Chin Gillian Hills • Vanessa Redgrave • Vera Grafin von Lehndorff-Steinort • Veruschka von Lehndorff • whole is other than the sum of the parts • young lovers

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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