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Which clippings match 'Digital Photography' keyword pg.1 of 2
25 DECEMBER 2012

Echograph: an interactive animated GIF app for iPad

"A little over a year ago, Kevin Burg and Jamie Beck mashed up fine–art photography with animated GIFs, and the 'cinemagraph' was born. Since then, a cottage app–industry has sprung up around this ingenious digital art form, offering everyday folks easy tools for creating artsy animated GIFs of their own. Now a new iPad–only app called Echograph is targeting professional and 'prosumer' imagemakers who want to get into the cinemagraph–making game.

If apps like Flixel are trying to be the Instagram of animated GIFs, Echograph is more like Photoshop Elements. It's pitched as a creative tool, not a social network or a digital–hipster fad. That's why it's designed for the iPad, which can display higher–resolution imagery and offer users enough screen space to subtly finesse the details of their animated compositions. 'We saw an opportunity to harness Echograph as a more professional medium that takes full advantage of DSLR and higher resolution videography,' Echograph CEO Nick Alt tells Co.Design."

(John Pavlus, Co.Design)

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animated compositions • animated gif • app-industry • artsy • cinemagraph • cinemagraph medium • cinemagraph-making • conversational tool • creative possibilities • creative tool • digital art formdigital photography • display ads • DSLReasy tools • Echograph (app) • fadfile formatFlixel (app)GIFhigh resolution • high-res imagery • imagemakers • immersive editorial content • iPad • iPad-only app • Jamie BeckKevin Burgliving pictureslomographymotion photograph • Nick Alt • partially animated photophotography • Photoshop Elements • Polaroid • popularised • prosumersingle still frame photographstorytelling medium • tactile feedback technology • videography

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MAY 2012

Aleks Krotoski's The Digital Human

"Aleks Krotoski asks not just what technology can do for us but also what is it doing to us and the world we're creating? Each week she takes us on a journey to where people are living their digital lives to explore how technology touches everything we do both on and offline.

Taking broad themes of modern living as a starting point she charts the experiences of homo digitas; both the remarkable and the mundane, to understand how we are changing just as quickly as the advances in our technology.

What does the deluge of images from digital photography mean for our memory when every second is being recorded, edited and posted online for posterity? Are the identities we create in social media no more than exercises in personal branding, to be managed and protected like any other product? And as traditional churches struggle to leverage technology to spread their faith do the behaviours we all display online have more in common with religion than rationality?

The time for wonder at the digital world is over, we live with it in every day. The question really is who are we now because of it?"

(BBC Radio 4)

Fig.1 "Mack on a summer morning", 30 March 2011 [http://www.mydogearedpages.com/2011/03/photographic–memories.html].

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2012advances in technology • Aleks Krotoski • BBC Radio 4 • being edited • constructed identitiescultural identitycyberpsychology • deluge of images • digital photography • digital world is over • display online • every second is being recorded • everydayfaith • homo digitas • human behaviouridentityidentity performanceimpression management • leverage technology • living digital livesmediated environmentsmemorymodern livingnew technologyonline and offlineour digital livespersonal branding • posted online • posterityrationalityreligionself-monitoringself-reflexivitysocial changesocial mediasocial media identitiestechnology touches everythingvirtual presence

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 NOVEMBER 2011

Anne Spalter: Traffic Circle

New York debut of Anne Morgan Spalter
@ Stephan Stoyano/LuxeGallery
November 29, 2011– January 6, 2012

"Stephan Stoyanov/Luxe Gallery is pleased to announce the inaugural New York City solo show of Anne Morgan Spalter, a new–media pioneer who initiated and taught the first fine arts new media courses at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) in 1990 and Brown University in 1992. Spalter's exhibition, Traffic Circle, is a milestone in her two–decade odyssey in integrating art and technology. Spalter draws on centuries of work in the landscape genre but brings a new perspective on the modern landscape.

With works created exclusively for this exhibition, Spalter introduces geometrically patterned video works generated from footage she shoots in traffic, from aerial perches, at airports, and on the highway. Several pieces feature iconic New York City landmarks such as Rockefeller Center. The rhythmically structured compositions isolate or abstract features and motion of the landscape, highlighting the passage of taxis down 5th Avenue, for example, and the soaring of planes on takeoff. Inspired by her mathematical background and interest in Islamic art, she uses a symmetrical kaleidoscopic framework to brings order to complexity.

Spalter's art has explored the concept of the 'modern landscape' since first shown publicly at the deCordova Museum in 1992. She draws on her travels and her digital photographic and video database to create still and moving pieces. Works are realized as prints, intimate screen–based works, and large–scale screen and projection works: her work was shown this past summer at Big Screen Plaza's 30–foot LCD screen in New York City as part of Leaders in Software Art (LISA) and at the RISD Museum of Art's Open Call Video Art Screening Program."

(Anne Morgan Spalter)

5). Exhibition Press Release.

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2011 • 5th Avenue • aerialairportAnne Spalterartart and technologyartistBrown Universitycompositioncomputer artdesign formalismdigital artdigital photographyexhibitionfine artgeometric patterngeometry • highway • iconicIslamic • Islamic art • kaleidoscopelandscape • Luxe Gallery (New York) • mathematicsmirrored effect • modern landscape • motorwaynew mediaNew York City • new-media pioneer • North American artistpatternRhode Island School of Design • rhythmic • RISD • Rockefeller Center • screen-based works • solo exhibition • solo show • Stephan Stoyanov • symmetrical patternsymmetry • taxi • traffic • Traffic Circle • video art • video works • visual communication

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MAY 2011

Digital Negative: Adobe's publicly available archival photo format

"Raw file formats are becoming extremely popular in digital photography workflows because they offer creative professionals greater creative control. However, cameras can use many different raw formats – the specifications for which are not publicly available – which means that not every raw file can be read by a variety of software applications. As a result, the use of these proprietary raw files as a long–term archival solution carries risk, and sharing these files across complex workflows is even more challenging.

The solution to this growing problem is Digital Negative (DNG), a publicly available archival format for the raw files generated by digital cameras. By addressing the lack of an open standard for the raw files created by individual camera models, DNG helps ensure that photographers will be able to access their files in the future.

Within a year of its introduction, several dozen software manufacturers such as Extensis, Canto, Apple, and iView developed support for DNG. And respected camera manufacturers such as Hasselblad, Leica, Casio, Ricoh, and Samsung have introduced cameras that provide direct DNG support."

(Adobe Systems Incorporated.)

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2004AdobeAdobe PhotoshopAdobe Systems IncApplearchival • archival format • archival solution • archiving • authentic resource • camera manufacturers • Canto • Casio • complex workflows • creative professionalsdigital • digital cameras • digital image preservationdigital negative • Digital Negative (DNG) • digital photographyDNG • Extensis • Hasselblad • intellectual propertyinteroperability • iView • Leica • metadata • open raw image format • open standardpreservationpreserving digital imagesproprietary • proprietary format • RAWraw file • Raw file format • RAW files • raw formats • reverse engineeringRicohroyalty freeSamsung • software applications • solutionspecification • standard format • standardisationtechnologyTIFFusabilityworkflow

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 FEBRUARY 2010

360 Panoramic Video Capture and Recording

"You have probably seen several times in the past, those immersive digital photographs in which you can easily look up and down and turn your vision all around in full 360° glory. The 360° panoramic new year's eve of 2003 in Times Square, New York, has been one of my first memorable favorites, as it captures so well the thousands of emotions and different people celebrating on the street at once.

But video technology is now surpassing even these spectacular capabilities, by delivering navigable 3D, immersive video which as good or better than the 360° navigable images you and I have seen until now.

Check this video out. Once it starts rolling, click and move your mouse in different directions. You will be surprised to see that you can now fully navigate also inside moving video images.

The visual impact is really quite shocking, especially if, this is the very first time you are in front of a 3D, immersive and fully navigable video.

This spectacular feat is achieved by utilizing eleven video streams arranged according in a geodesic fashion. By doing so it is possible to capture an almost complete spherical image; a high–resolution 360 degree view of surroundings that is seamlessly stitched together.

Immersive navigable 3D movies can integrate GIS coordinates and other metadata to create highly informative, educational or life–saving emergency and assistance video guides.

The company behind this impressive new media technology is Immersive Media Corp., based in Calgary, Canada. The company also owns the wholly–owned subsidiary Immersive Media Company, based in Portland, Oregon.

The dodecahedron, with its twelve symmetrical pentagonal facets, is the most natural geometric division of a sphere for immersive image capture. It offers symmetrical, standardized divisions of the sphere that make the most of the image produced by each lens, and produces even resolution in every direction, better blending of the images, and more even illumination of the overall scene.

Perfectly equal and parallel faces, edges and corner angles, and divisions according to the Golden Ratio: A/B=(A+B)/A

It is the most natural geometric division of a sphere for immersive video image capture. It produces:

The enormous number of pixels recorded enables the highest image quality in every direction. The result is consistent image resolution across the entire spherical frame, with photographic realism and full motion.

Over 100 million pixels per second are recorded, resulting in spherical frames of 2400x1200 pixels, 30 frames per second. With the Telemmersion System, software is not required to correct sub–standard image resolution.

Images may be viewed spherically using the IMViewer software for looking around, or in an overall panoramic sphere movie format utilizing standard video playback platforms such as Windows Media® Player or QuickTime®."

(Edited by: Luigi Canali De Rossi)

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360 degree view360 degrees3D • Calgary • Canadadigital photographydodecahedrongeodesicGISgolden ratioimage captureimmersionimmersive • immersive image capture • Immersive Media Company • immersive photography • immersive video • IMViewer software • navigable 3D • navigable images • new media technology • New YorkOregonpanorama • panoramic sphere • photographic realismphotographyPortland (Oregon)QuickTimespectacle • spherical • stereoscopic • symmetrical • Telemmersion System • Times Squarevideo • video playback platforms • video technology • visual impact • Windows Media Player

CONTRIBUTOR

Suttana Keyuraphan
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