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Which clippings match 'Ephemera' keyword pg.1 of 5
13 AUGUST 2013

Retronaut: a curated collection of visual ephemera

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 JUNE 2013

The Visual Telling of Stories: a collection of advertising images, magazine spreads and book illustrations

"The website of The Visual Telling of Stories aspires to being a Visual Lexicon, dedicated to the primacy of the Visual Proposition. Above all it tries to create an overall consistency of structure and environment, as if it was all taking place in one characteristic landscape through which you are allowed to wander. The main delight and challenge is the invention of non–linear means of navigation through spaces of knowledge with a created balance of reference and discovery."

(Chris Mullen)

Fig.1 Emile Allais, Roger Frison–Roche, et al. (1947). How to Ski by the French Method: Emile Allais, Technic. Preface by Frison–Roche. Photos and Layout by Pierre Boucher. Translated from the French by Agustin R. Edwards, Éditions Flèche [http://www.fulltable.com/vts/aoi/b/boucher/bc.htm].

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TAGS

advertising imagesadvertising posters • Agustin Edwards • American dreambook designbook illustration • Chris Mullen • collected examples • cultural codescultural narrativesdesign and visual culture • Emile Allais • ephemeragraphic representationimage collectionlogocentricmagazine layoutmaterial culturemiscellaneousnewspaperspersonal cataloguepersonal collections • pictures tell stories • propaganda • Roger Frison-Roche • vintage advertisingvisual codesvisual communicationvisual culturevisual ephemera • visual lexicon • visual taxonomy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 FEBRUARY 2013

Archaeology is about our relationships with what is left of the past

"Archaeology is what archaeologists do. This answer is not a tautology. It refers us to the practices of archaeology. And to the conditions under which archaeologists work – the institutions and infrastructures, the politics and pragmatics of getting archaeological work done.

Archaeologists work on what is left of the past. Archaeology is about relationships – between past and present, between archaeologist and traces and remains. Archaeology is a set of mediating practices – working on remains to translate, to turn them into something sensible – inventory, account, narrative, explanation, whatever.

Archaeology is a way of acting and thinking – about what is left of the past, about the temporality of remainder, about material and temporal processes to which people and their goods are subject, about the processes of order and entropy, of making, consuming and discarding at the heart of human experience.

'Archaeological Sensibility' and 'Archaeological Imagination' are terms to summarize components of these mediating and transformative practices. Sensibility refers us to the perceptual components of how we engage with the remains of the past. Imagination refers us to the creative component – to the transforming work that is done on what is left over."

(Michael Shanks)

TAGS

archaeological imagination • archaeological sensibility • archaeologist • archaeologybetween past and presentclassificationconsumingconsumptioncultural significance of objects • discarding • entropyephemerahuman experienceinterpretationinventorymakingmaterial processesmaterial worldmaterialitymediating practices • Michael Shanks • orderremainder • remains • remains of the pastsymbolic meaning • tautology • temporal processes • temporality • the discipline of things • theory buildingthingstraces • transformative practices • useful significancewhat is left of the past • what is left over

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MAY 2012

Sandra Mardin's Lofidelica

"Lofidelica is a personal blog that I've been running since 2005, initially via blogspot and later migrated to tumblr. In the beginnings, I used the blog to post weekly playlists, reviews and posts related to my radio shows at Kanal 103 in Skopje, Macedonia. Thus, you're likely to stumble across some playlists in the archives of this blog (10/2009–10/2010). The radio show stopped running in 2010 after I moved to the UK.

Today, I use the blog to assemble my writing and projects across different platforms, as an online portfolio. Besides music, I also blog and reblog anything that interests me in culture, design, semiotics, trends, insight, advertising, research etc."

(Sandra Mardin)

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2005 • advertising blogging • blog • blog to assemble • blogger • Blogspot • design bloggingephemera • interests me in culture • Kanal 103 • Lofidelica • Macedonia • music blogging • music reviews • online portfoliopersonal blogplaylistradio showreblog • research blogging • semiotics • Skopje • trendsTumblrUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 FEBRUARY 2012

The Fox Is Black: a design community destination for creativity

"The Fox Is Black, formerly Kitsune Noir, was started in April of 2007 as a way of sharing interesting ideas with likeminded people. The blog has now become a staple in the design community as a destination for creativity and fresh ideas. Updated daily, the blog shares a melange of topics ranging from design, culture, music, and films. Every Wednesday we release a new desktop wallpaper on The Desktop Wallpaper Project, a way to decorate your computer background with the work of the best illustrators, designers and photographers in the world."

(Bobby Solomon)

Fig.1 Hans Andersson's "Time Twister" clock.

Fig.2 Fleet Foxes, animation by Sean Pecknold using illustrations by Stacey Rozich.

Fig.3 Lei Lei/Raydesign "My… My…".

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TAGS

2007animationblog • computer background • contemporary musiccool stuffcreativitycuriosity • decorate • design blogdesign communitydesigners • desktop wallpaper • Desktop Wallpaper Project • destination for creativity • ephemera • fresh ideas • graphic designideasillustrationillustrators • Kitsune Noir • LEGO • likeminded people • ludic • melange of topics • photographers • Raydesign • Sean Pecknold • sharing interesting ideas • Stacey Rozich • The Fox Is Black • updated daily • video artvisual culturevisual designvisual ideas • water calligraphy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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