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Which clippings match 'Young Women' keyword pg.1 of 2
02 JULY 2014

Procter & Gamble use 'Like a Girl' viral to co-opt female consumers

"Procter & Gamble Co.'s Always today is launching 'Like a Girl,' a video ... that takes issue with generations of playground taunts about people running, throwing or fighting 'like a girl.' It asks: 'When did doing something 'like a girl' become an insult?'"

(Jack Neff, 26 June 2014, Advertising Age)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 NOVEMBER 2013

GoldieBlox uses gender politics to target consumers

"One of the most anti–feminist songs of the 1980s, 'Girls' by the Beastie Boys, is recast as an empowering theme for young women in a new toy ad looking to break gender stereotypes.

The spot is a holiday promotion for GoldieBlox, a construction–themed board game that nearly doubled its Kickstarter goal in 2012. Game developer Debbie Sterling designed GoldieBlox to combine young girls' love of reading and characters with the engineering themes of toys typically more popular with boys, like Legos and erector sets. To that end, the ad features a massive Rube Goldberg scenario, designed by OK Go contraption collaborator Brett Doar. As the machine's workings unravel, the girls sing modified Beastie Boys lyrics: 'It's time to change/We deserve to see a range/'Cause all our toys look just the same/And we would like to use our brains.'"

(David Griner, 19 November 2013, Adweek)

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TAGS

2012adAdweekBeastie Boys • board game • Brett Doar • contraptionculture of pretty • Debbie Sterling • emotive manipulationempowerment themeengineering • engineering themes • feminist themesgender performance culturegender stereotypesgirl powergirls • GoldieBlox • interactive books • inventive power • Kickstarter • love of reading • magical contraption • OK Go • pink and prettyrepresentation of womenRube Goldberg machinetoy • toy company • young girlyoung women

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 OCTOBER 2013

Decoding BMW's You Know You Are Not The First

"The young woman's flawless skin is emphasizing the societal view of how perfection is what is considered beautiful and ideal. Her skin doesn't have a single blemish bruise, bump, or scar on it. Her makeup is very subtle and her cheeks have a slight rosy glow to them, giving her a very youthful appearance. The lack of jewelry is also making her look younger and more innocent and it is putting the focus solely on her bare flawless skin, this flawlessness is likely representing what one would get if they purchase one of their premium selection used BMW's, spotlessness in paint and interior.

Although BMW engages this image of innocence and flawlessness, there also appears to be a significant sexual message in this ad because the initial 'Innocent' image dissolves as you skim down the ad and see how the young woman's eye contact is directly with the camera, and it looks as if she is looking right into your eyes with a seductive expression. Her mouth also get a lot of attention as it appears to be slightly open, drawing your attention right to her full lips, 'open lips are used to suggest sexual excitement or passion'"

(Sonia Sidhu, 10 June 2012)

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TAGS

2008advertising campaignArthur Berger • atypical • blondeBMWbranded commodities • car company • constructed meaningcultural normsdepictions of womeneye contact • flawlessness • Germanglobalisation of aspirationGreece • hair colour • innocenceinterpretation • media analysis • media criticismmedia textmouth • olive skin • paradigmatic analysis • partially unclothedperfection • print advertisement • seduction • semiotic approach • semioticssex objectsexual agency • sexual excitement • signification • skin tone • suggestive narratives • syntagmatic analysis • textual analysis • used car • virginity • visual symbolism • young woman • young women

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 SEPTEMBER 2013

Is porno-chic the new black?

"Currently there is a three–year research project going on at The University of Auckland to examine the broader effects of pornography on New Zealand society. Pornography has always been with us you could argue, so why the fuss now? One reason is the growth of the internet. Pornographic imagery is just a click away. Gonzo porn, where there is aggression directed at women, is the growth area in this multi–billion dollar industry. Question its prevalence, and you run the risk of being considered a prude in today's climate of liberal tolerance–very uncool.

It's supposed to be empowering for women to be sexual in their behaviour and dress. We are sold 'technologies of sexiness' wrapped up in the rhetoric of individual consumer choice. To be 'hot' is the aim of every pimply tween, male or female, and that means trying to refashion yourself into a porn body. Desperate effort goes into maintaining sexual currency as age takes its toll."

(Linda Tyler, 8th Sep 2013, NZ Fashion Museum blog)

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TAGS

aggression directed towards women • Anna Jagodzinska • Anna Selezneva • Calvin Klein • Carson Parker • cool • Cosmopolitan (magazine) • Crystal Renn • Danny Schwarz • degrading behaviour • demeaningdepictions of women • Dolce and Gabbana • Domenico Dolce • Duncan Quinn • Edita Vilkeviciute • erotic scenes • eroticizing violence • fashion advertising • fashion culture • fashion modelfashion photography • FCUK • female consumer • French Connection UK • gang rape • glamourising violence • gonzo porn • group sex • Helen Gurley Brown • high fashion • Jimmy Choo • Karolina Kurkova • Lara Stone • liberal tolerance • mainstream imagery • maltreatment • Mario Sorrenti • mens fashion • Mikus Lasmanis • Natasha Poly • New Zealand Fashion Museum • normalising violence • partially unclothedPlayboy (magazine)plaything • porn body • pornification of visual culture • pornoporno-chicpornographic imagespornographicationpornography • prude • public spaceQuincy Jonesrape • refashion yourself • sadomasochistic sexsex objectsex sellssexual agencysexual behaviour • sexual currency • sexual depictions • sexual game • sexualised depictions • sexualised violence • Stephano Gabbana • Steven Klein • Steven Meisel • suggestive narratives • technologies of sexiness • Tom Ford • uncool • University of Auckland • V Magazine • violence against women • violence directed towards women • visual communication • Vladimir Ivanov • Vogue Magazine • womens fashion • young women

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 AUGUST 2013

Scary Gorgeous by the dance company RashDash

"Scary Gorgeous and it's about the pressure on young women to appear sexually available and post provocative pictures of themselves on the web, and also about how sexual relationships are damaged when our imaginations become colonised by pornographic images."

(Lyn Gardner, 15 August 2011)

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TAGS

2011 • Abbi Greenland • commodifying myselfcommodity fetishismdance theatregender performance culture • Helen Goalen • me in pictures • mediated by images • mediated representationnormalising over-sharingon the webperformativitypornographic imagesposting onlineprovocative pictures • RashDash (dance company) • relations between people • Scary Gorgeous (dance) • self-shotsselfiesexual depictionssexualised depictionssocial life • social pressure • spectacular societyteenvoyeurismyoung peopleyoung women

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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