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Which clippings match 'Breakdown' keyword pg.1 of 2
29 MARCH 2014

An extensive online resource for creating new ideas

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TAGS

absence thinking • action verbs • areas of key value • art streaming • assumption busting • attribute listing • braindrawing • brainmapping • brainstorming • brainwriting • breakdown • challenge • chunking • conflict • Crawford slip method • create new ideas • creative ideas • creative method • creative methods • creative skills • creative stimulus • creative techniques • creative tension • creative thinkingcreative toolscreativity • creativity toolbox • creativity tools • David Straker • day in the life • decomposition • deep analysis • delphi methoddoodlingdrawing • essential qualities • expand thinking • explore ideas • extended ideas • focused thinking • forced conflict • forcing combinations • gain consensus • gradually unfolding • group doodlin • guided imagery • hierarchical breakdown and exploration • how to • how-how diagram • idea generationimagineering • incomplete doodles • incubation • lateral thinking • looking at the problem backwards • lotus blossom • mind-mapping • minimal personal interaction • modelling • morphological analysis • nominal group technique • non-verbal stimulation • online resourcepausepost-it notes • post-up • problem plus stimulus equals idea • provocation • random word • random words • real problem • remembering solutions • remembrance • reversal • reverse brainstorming • rightbraining • role-play • rubber-ducking • scamper • Six Thinking Hats • stimulate the subconscious • stimuli • storyboarding • subconscious • take a break • talk and talk • talk streaming • the Kipling method • think more deeply • thinking sideways • toolbox • triz contradiction analysis • unblock • unconscious assumptions • unfold the flower • unfolding • value engineering • visioning • visual story • wishing • write and write • write streaming

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 NOVEMBER 2013

Applying Heidegger's Philosophy to Design

"Heidegger's philosophy offers what is arguably the most thorough account of the process of human understanding available. Although his analysis of interpretation is useful if one is to understand activities like innovative design, it never addresses the realm of design directly. Heidegger discusses interpretation at a high level of generality and chooses his examples from interactions between people and physical artifacts, like the use of hammers by carpenters. He is concerned with the nature of understandingly being in the world. While a person's world includes conceptual and imaginative realms like design, Heidegger's examples primarily come from the world of physical artifacts which can be encountered perceptually. ...

Heidegger treats artifacts in the world the same way he would treat design artifacts on the drawing board. That is, he is not really concerned with them as physically present objects of perception. On the contrary, his main effort philosophically is to distinguish artifacts–in–use from traditional conceptions of physically–present–objects. For example, a hammer in use is not understood by the carpenter as an observed object with physical attributes, but is skillfully applied to the activities of the current situation. Furthermore, this skillful use takes place within the context of future–oriented plans and desires, such as the anticipation of the item that is under construction. This is similar to components of a design, which are skillfully arranged in terms of their relationships to other design components and within the context of the anticipated final design. Marks in a design sketch, for instance, are important for their roles within a network of significances, rather than for their physical properties as lines. Interpretation of both physical artifacts and designs is situated. ...

The notion of breakdown in action plays a rather small role in Heidegger's analysis of human understanding. Heidegger uses examples of breakdown in order to make explicit the network of references among artifacts that are only present tacitly under conditions of normal use. Yet, the notion of breakdown has been elevated to central importance in the theories that have tried to adopt Heidegger's analysis to a theory of design and to operationalize this theory for computer support. Thus, breakdown plays an important role in Schön (1985), Winograd & Flores (1986), Suchman (1987), Ehn (1988), Budde & Züllighoven (1990), McCall, Morch, & Fischer (1990), Dreyfus (1991), Coyne & Snodgrass (1991), Fischer & Nakakoji (1992).

The fact that so many writers influenced by Heidegger have focused on breakdown does not provide multiple independent support for this emphasis. ... most of these writers have been influenced by Heidegger only indirectly–either through Dreyfus or through Schön. If one looks closely at the discussions of breakdown in Dreyfus and Schön, one can note an ambiguity in whether they are speaking about a (ontological) breakdown in the network of references or a (practical) breakdown in action. Dreyfus is certainly aware of the ontological role of breakdown, but he is concerned to make his presentation acceptable to an American audience, trained in the rationalist tradition. For the sake of concreteness, he uses examples that stress the breakdown in action. Schön is also aware of the ontological ramifications, but he has couched his discussion in terms of action (e.g., knowing–in–action, reflection–in–action), so it often seems that his examples of breakdown exemplify breakdowns in action rather than breakdowns in situated understanding. Given that it is easier to operationalize breakdowns in action than breakdowns in situated understanding, it is not surprising that people interested in producing practical results from Dreyfus or Schön's theories would tend to emphasize the action–oriented reading of the ambiguous discussions."

(Gerry Stahl, 5 January 2004)

TAGS

action-oriented reading • Adrian Snodgrass • Anders Morch • anticipation • artefacts-in-use • being-in-the-worldbreakdown • breakdown in action • breakdown in the network of references • breakdowns in action • breakdowns in situated understanding • carpenter • conceptual domain • concreteness • current situationdesign artefactsdesign innovation • design sketch • design theoryDonald Schon • drawing board • Fernando Floresflow • Gerhard Fischer • Gerry Stahl • hammer • Heinz Zullighoven • Hubert Dreyfushuman perception • human understanding • innovative design • knowing-in-action • Kumiyo Nakakoji • Lucy Suchman • Martin Heidegger • nature of understanding • network of references • network of significances • normal use • objects of perception • Pelle Ehn • philosophy of design • physical artefacts • physical attributes • physical properties • physically present • physically-present-objects • rationalist tradition • Raymond McCall • reflection-in-action • Reinhard Budde • Richard Coynesituated construction of realitysituated knowledgessketching ideas • skillful use • Terry Winogradtheory of design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MARCH 2013

VFX breakdowns for BBC One TV series Ripper Street

"With a final dollop of blood splatter sploshing across the plasma TV, Series One of BBC's visceral police drama Ripper Street came to a crashing finish on Sunday night!

Screen Scene VFX completed all the visual effects work on Ripper Street's first season, and are proud to share this fantastic breakdown/making of video showing you how they weaved their inimitable brand of wizardry to make Dublin look like Victorian London."

(Screen Scene Post Production Facilities, 26 February 2013)

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18892013 • Adam Rothenberg • BBC One • BBC series • BBC TV • blood splatter • breakdown • chaotic streets • compositingcostume dramaDublin • Ed Bruce • EdBruceVFX • H Division • Jerome Flynn • Joe Gilgun • London East End • making of • Mathew Macfadyen • police • police drama • post production • Richard Warlow • Ripper Street • scene designscenery • Screen Scene Post Production Facilities • Screen Scene VFX • SFXtelevisionTV seriesVFX • Victorian London • visceralvisual effectsvisual spectacle • Whitechape

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 MARCH 2011

ListAssist: peer-reviewed reading list service for Emerald subscribers

"Emerald will soon be offering a unique peer–reviewed reading list service to all subscribers – Emerald Reading ListAssist, which will help users to make the very most of their subscription. This service will raise awareness of Emerald's cross–disciplinary content, coherently combining new research with more seminal papers, in a format which breaks down a subject by sessions, making it easily applicable to under–graduate or post–graduate courses or modules.

Created for students and lecturers by students and lecturers, Emerald Reading ListAssist aims to improve and support faculty workflow. The service also provides students with a high–quality research tool, helping to build information literacy and research skills. The rigorous academic construction of Reading ListAssist assures a high level of quality for the user; each list is peer–reviewed by subject experts as well as in–house reviewers to make sure it meets the highest quality standards."

(Emerald Group Publishing Limited)

[Note that this is a subscription–only service.]

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academic construction • breakdownconceptualisationcoursescross-disciplinary • Emerald Group Publishing • Emerald Reading ListAssist • enquiryinformation literacyintegrationlecturers • ListAssist • modules • new research • pedagogypeer-reviewedpostgraduatereading listresearchresearch practiceresearch skillsresearch toolreviewrigourseminalservicestudent • subject experts • subject specialistsundergraduate

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 MARCH 2011

Extreme frustration: in reality and the Meisner technique

"The Meisner acting technique is a many layered approach that relies heavily on a practice known as emotional preparation. Named after Sanford Meisner, the Meisner technique began as a systematic study of the art of acting for theatre. Based on work done by Russian actor Constantine Stanislovski, Meisner created a hybrid technique that he felt was better suited to the American actor and American theatre. ...

Actors using the Meisner acting technique have the ability to immerse themselves in an emotional 'state' of the character before going onstage. Rather than pretending extreme frustration they must ARE extremely frustrated as they enter the scene. Furthermore, Meisner believed that any actor looking to exploit the Meisner acting technique does their homework by creating and developing a complete set of circumstances and a complete emotional landscape that is in tune with the deeper cravings, needs and emotions that have caused the character to be frustrated."

(Maggie Flanigan Studio)

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acting is doing • actoraggression • anger • artistic practicebreakdowncharacter • circumstances • composurecomputercomputer printerconflictConstantin Stanislavskidistressdramaemotion • emotional landscape • emotional preparation • emotional undercurrent • escalation • expressionextreme frustrationfilm acting • forceful • frustrationgesturehate • high emotion • incidentintensity • Maggie Flanigan • Meisner technique • office • outburst • PCperformancepersonal experiencephysical actions • physical task • Prt Sc • ragereactionSanford Meisnerscene • tantrum • temper

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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